Al-Farabi and His School

Couverture
Psychology Press, 1999 - 128 pages
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Al-Farabi and His School examines one of the most exciting and dynamic periods in the development of medieval Islam: the period which ran from the late ninth century to the early eleventh century AD. This age is examined through the thought of five of its principal thinkers and named after the first and greatest of these as the "Age of Farabism." Ian Richard Netton demonstrates that the great Islamic philosopher al-Farabi (870-950), called "the Second Master" after Aristotle, produced a recognizable school of thought. This school of thought, which Netton refers to as the "School of al-Farabi," was influenced by the thought of Plato, Aristotle, and Plotinus. Yet, it was much more than a mere clone of Greek thought. The originality and independence of thought expressed by such adherents as Yahya b. Adi, Abu Sulayman al-Sijistani, al-Amiri and Abu Hayyan al-Tawhidi is described, appreciated, and critically assessed in this volume, with an emphasis given to the fundamentals of epistemology. Al-Farabi and His School is unique in its examination of the intellectual continuity that was maintained in an age of flux, and its particular emphasis on the ethical dimensions of knowledge. -- Back cover.

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Table des matières

IV
1
V
4
VI
8
VII
11
VIII
13
IX
16
X
18
XI
31
XVII
62
XVIII
71
XIX
76
XX
83
XXI
88
XXII
91
XXIII
111
XXIV
120

XII
34
XIII
54

Expressions et termes fréquents

À propos de l'auteur (1999)

Ian R. Netton is Professor of Arabic Studies at the University of Leeds. He is author or editor of sixteen books, including "A Popular Dictionary of Islam" (1997), "Sufi Ritual: The Parallel Universe" (2000) and (ed.) "Encyclopaedia of Islamic Civilization and Religion" (2006)

Informations bibliographiques