BCGNIS Query Results

Waddington, MountOfficial Name
Feature Type:Mount
Latitude:51°22'25" Position at: CENTRE
Longitude:125°15'48"
Gazetteer Map:92N/6
Relative Location:NE of head of Knight Inlet, Range 2 Coast Land District
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Origin Notes and History

Adopted 3 April 1928 on Ottawa file OBF 1018 (file M.1.27); re-approved 6 April 1950 on 92 NW.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

Elevation 13,177 feet (4016m). Third highest mountain in British Columbia [Fairweather Mountain and Mount Quincy Adams are higher, but both straddle the BC-Alaska boundary, hence Mount Waddington is the highest mountain ENTIRELY within the province.] First ascent credited to Fritz H. Weissner of New York, and William P. House of Pittsburgh, 21 July 1936 (Canadian Alpine Journal 1936, p.9.)
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

This was the feature that R.P. Bishop, BCLS, proposed in June 1923 be named "Mount Cradock"; Bishop had viewed this massif in 1922 from his triangulation station on the southwest side of Chilko Lake, which summit he named "Good Hope Mtn" [both names referring to Rear-Admiral Cradock, flagship HMS Good Hope, who went down with his ship at the naval battle of Coronel, off the coast of Chile, in World War I.] (34275S, file P.1.24; February 2943, file C.1.65). Mountaineers Don and Phyllis Munday made annual attempts to gain the summit beginning in 1926, and encapsulated their adventures in "The Unknown Mountain" published by Hodder & Stoughton in 1948; reprinted by Snohomish Publishing, Seattle, 1975.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

Named after Alfred Waddington, who from 1861-64 attempted to locate a road from the head of Bute Inlet up the Homathko River and Mosley Creek, thence through the Coast Mountains and the Chilcotin plateau to Fort Alexandria. Description of his endeavors in Beautiful British Columbia magazine, Summer 1987. See also Waddington Harbour.
Source: BC place name cards, or correspondence to/from BC's Chief Geographer or BC Geographical Names Office

Don and Phyllis Munday, the first to climb on this great mountain, called it "Mystery Mountain". The authorities decided, however, to name it after Alfred Waddington, an Englishman who arrived in Victoria in 1858, who was a notable champion of unsuccessful causes.
Source: Akrigg, Helen B. and Akrigg, G.P.V; British Columbia Place Names; Sono Nis Press, Victoria 1986 /or University of British Columbia Press 1997

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