Breivik's Swamp

Was the Oslo killer radicalized by what he read online?

BY TOBY ARCHER | JULY 25, 2011

If there is an intellectual inspiration for the counter-jihad, it has been provided by the work of British-Swiss "historian" Bat Ye'or, who argues in a 2005 book and elsewhere that we are witnessing the gradual and willful takeover of Europe by Islam -- the "Eurabia" thesis. Breivik cites Ye'or's work dozens of times in his manifesto.

The Eurabia plan, Ye'or contends, originated with French leaders in the 1950s as a way to create an axis between Europe and the Arab world to counterbalance the United States and the Soviet Union. The creation of the European Union is supposedly at the heart of this scheme; the method: allowing the mass migration of Muslims into Europe to change the demographic balance. Hence counter-jihadists like Breivik see Muslim immigration to Europe as part of a jihad against the West.

Ye'or's acolytes see this "invasion" as not only condoned but actively encouraged by European political and cultural elites -- who either want or are too naive to see the "Islamization" of Europe. This, therefore, is a Manichaean conflict between the Judeo-Christian and Islamic worlds, with counter-jihad voices continually stating that there can be no accommodation between the two. Victory or submission are the only possible outcomes. If one was to take this proposition seriously, both Breivik's "logic" of targeting the ruling Norwegian Labour Party and the ferocity of his assault begins to make some sense.

The counter-jihad began in the years following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks as a collection of bloggers concerned about jihadi terrorism aimed at the West. With the bombings in Madrid and London, among numerous other plots and attacks in Europe (and to a lesser extent in North America), along with the political divisions caused by the Iraq war, the thesis became more widely known and influential on the Internet. One leading blogger of the counter-jihad has described the movement as a network of networks, perhaps ironically echoing many counterterrorism experts' description of al Qaeda.

This makes its hard to write a formal history of the inherently nebulous movement, but one important date is October 2007, when an early gathering of various activists took place in Brussels called "Counter Jihad 2007." Some of the meetings were inside the European Parliament -- the very belly of the purported Eurabian beast -- because the rooms could be booked by their hosts, the Belgian right-wing political party Vlaams Belang (VB). VB's main focus is on the secession of Flanders from Belgium, but it is also very skeptical of the EU and of anti-Muslim immigration.

Other conferences have followed and from them new networks have emerged, including SIOE and SIOA. The organization SIOA (Stop Islamization of America) has in particular become very prominent, organizing the protest rallies against the so called "Ground Zero Mosque." A meeting was meant to have taken place this month in Strasbourg, bringing together both European and American counter-jihad supporters, although it was canceled at the last moment for reasons that are currently still contested. But the 2007 meeting remains noteworthy, as it indicates the impact of the counter-jihad rhetoric and thinking on European populist-right politics.

Populist right-wing politicians across Europe have echoed many of the anti-Islamization themes of the counter-jihad -- most notably Geert Wilders and the Party of Freedom in the Netherlands -- but the influence is also particularly clear to see across the Nordic region. Stopping Muslim immigration and criticizing Muslim immigrants for insufficient integration has become a winning political issue, up to a point, for the Norwegian Progress Party (of which Breivik was once a member), the Danish People's Party, the Sweden Democrats, and the True Finns. In that sense, Breivik is just one terrible extreme of a discontent with social change felt across all the Nordic social democracies.

Having watched the counter-jihad develop for more than five years, I had always thought that its most negative impact would be on community cohesion within multicultural European countries. For example, alongside their support for populist-right anti-immigrant parties, the counter-jihadists have cheered the development of anti-Muslim street movements like the English Defence League that have provoked trouble in European cities, turning from protests into riots and requiring huge policing efforts.

The counter-jihad flirts with violent imagery, but I did not expect that anyone would commit a massacre on the scale of what Breivik has just done. Nor, I am sure, did most of the counter-jihadists. Still, the movement has some serious soul-searching to do. The numerous bloggers and activists of the counter-jihad may not call for direct violence, but they have painted a picture of a world where conflict with both immigrants and Europe's supposed multicultural elite is inevitable. In that sense, they may not have given Breivik his orders, but they paved the road down which he chose to walk.

Getty Images

 

Toby Archer is a freelance researcher and writer. Previously, he researched terrorism, political extremism, and immigration politics for the Finnish Institute of International Affairs.

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GUEST001

2:39 PM ET

July 25, 2011

...

"The direct participation in the war against Yugoslavia by providing military forces and territory for their deployment took Belgium, Hungary, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Turkey". ... Maybe that's a revenge for his country: you made them suffer, would you like it if they've donethe same to you. Hmm.

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GUEST001

2:50 PM ET

July 25, 2011

one more thing, why this

one more thing, why this Breivik should ask for pating more attention to the question of islamistaion of Europe if all Europe is already scared of muslims? All airports double-check them, all embassies double-check them etc. Maybe Someone wants to strengthen security, boost soldiers amount and continue wars? If so, blaming on muslims and islam is just a perfect choice for them.
We are all in grievance, but we have to think logically, as behind may be a worser threat than that, about which we hear (and nowadays quite often) on TV, read in press and internet.

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ARAVAY

11:40 AM ET

July 26, 2011

Europe's violent muslims

Jihadist networks span Europe from Poland to Portugal, thanks to the spread of radical Islam among the descendants of guest workers once recruited to shore up Europe's postwar economic miracle. In smoky coffeehouses in Rotterdam and Copenhagen, makeshift prayer halls in Hamburg and Brussels, Islamic bookstalls in Birmingham and "Londonistan," and the prisons of Madrid, Milan, and Marseilles, immigrants or their descendants are volunteering for jihad against the West. It was a Dutch Muslim of Moroccan descent, born and socialized in Europe, who murdered the filmmaker Theo van Gogh in Amsterdam last November. A Nixon Center study of 373 mujahideen in western Europe and North America between 1993 and 2004 found more than twice as many Frenchmen as Saudis and more Britons than Sudanese, Yemenites, Emiratis, Lebanese, or Libyans. Fully a quarter of the jihadists it listed were western European nationals -- eligible to travel visa-free to the United States.

The emergence of homegrown mujahideen in Europe threatens the United States as well as Europe. Yet it was the dog that never barked at last winter's Euro-American rapprochement meeting. Neither President George W. Bush nor Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice drew attention to this mutual peril, even though it should focus minds and could buttress solidarity in the West.

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NSC LOS ANGELES

3:35 PM ET

July 25, 2011

What a ridiculous article

What odd times we live in when standing up against a patriarchal religion to defend the rights of women, gay people and Jews earns you the title "extreme right."

This is a one-sided propoganda piece that fails to acknowledge the very real problems with Muslims and Europe and places 100% of the blame on "street movements" like the EDL. Have you been to Tower Hamlets lately? Or ever? Have you seen the pro-Sharia demonstrations in Luton? Have you been to the no-go zones in France? Have you walked out of a high street shop to be stopped by a 12 year old boy who tells you "in my country men go first"? Have you had imams tell you to "put some clothes on" whilst wearing a dress in North London? Do you have any firsthand experience with this issue at all or was this charming little hit piece a cheap compilation of the blather you might find on Little Green Footballs?

I would encourage the author to actually research the counter-jihad movement and learn about the many non-western, non-white members who fill its ranks; people who have lived under Islamic rule and unlike this author, understand what's in store.

With an absurd headline like "Was the Oslo killer radicalized by what he read online?" Foreign Policy is turning into sensationalized junk resembling the Daily Mail.

  REPLY
 

PECHORIN

8:36 PM ET

July 25, 2011

Ridiculous

You are the propagandist here. It is very clear that there is a distinction between holding attitudes critical to Islam and the outrageous theses of the "counter-jihad" movement. There is some small degree of overlap, yes, but the outrageous claims made about existential struggle with Islam are plainly dangerous. How can you not see how a blog calling itself "Gates of Vienna" isn't offering a veiled incitement to violence? How divorced from reality does a person have to be to believe that the inconsequentially tiny population of Muslims in the United States is intent on replacing the Constitution with Sharia law? Are Catholics preparing to institute Vatican Law? Are Jews plotting to impose kashrut?

For a person who calls the Daily Mail sensationalized, you sure do seem to buy in to a lot of its nonsense.

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MRJS1G

3:46 AM ET

July 26, 2011

Re: PECHORIN

You must've done a very poor reading (if you didn't just judge the post by its title and first paragraph, that is) if you believe that "NSC Los Angeles" insinuated anything like radical "counter-jihad".

She (it's strongly implied that the poster is a female: "Have you had imams tell you to 'put some clothes on' whilst wearing a dress in North London?") is simply irate, quite rightly I believe, by the broadness of the brushstroke Mr. Toby Archer is utilizing in describing those who Breivik was supposedly influenced by. Ms. "NSC" also seems to be stating that just because one criticizes Islam and is afraid of its implications does not make him / her a "counter-jihadist", like Mr. Archer does and ergo, wants him to take more careful consideration before writing with such sweeping characterizations.

As for calling her a propagandist -- it seems as though you are quite lacking not only in rudimentary religious jargon (i.e. "Sharia law") but also in vernacular.

pro·pa·gan·da noun \?prä-p?-?gan-d?, ?pr?-\: Information, esp. of a biased or misleading nature, used to promote or publicize a particular political cause or point of view

Doesn't seem like she's furthering or denouncing any "particular political cause". She takes issue with the author's driving (and implied) principle: that anybody who denounces Islam is a "counter-jihadist" and thus, prejudiced.

Next time, please do us all a favor and be more fastidious before replying with such absurd tripe.

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PECHORIN

8:58 AM ET

July 26, 2011

I don't see any need to

I don't see any need to defend my reading comprehension, but I will say that your poor writing skills make your pedantry seem very more out of place. Most people who try and present themselves as authorities do better than to fill their sentences with lengthy and unrelated parentheticals.

As long as I'm on the topic of pedantry, I'll take the opportunity to point out to you that "Sharia law" is not inherently redundant as suggest. Sharia is the Arabic word for way or path, and there are diverse interpretations within Islam on what that entails. Only some of these interpretations are legalistic.

I really don't feel a need to respond to any other of your points, largely because I don't think they merit a response but also because you made no effort to respond to any of mine. Your writing is turgid and overwrought; I don't think I thought calling something "absurd tripe" was clever since I was a teenager.

Say whatever you will to try and inoculate "anti-Jihadists" against charges of responsibility for the Oslo attacks, their own words are sufficient condemnation. I'll leave an example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3R4yTdsCktw

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THEOSEBES GOODFELLOW

10:35 AM ET

July 26, 2011

"Innoculating anti-jihadists"

The easiest way to win a war is to have your opponent deny that a war exists. That is the premise of this article. While I condemn what Brevik did, I cannot argue with his position. The war of cultures is upon us. There is no middle ground as Islam doesn't brook it. What is important is for those who embrace western culture to determine whether it is worth fighting and dying for, for those are the only choices, short of dhimmitude.

3 Things about Islam
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ib9rofXQl6w

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ARAVAY

11:35 AM ET

July 26, 2011

Pechorin is a moron

"I'll take the opportunity to point out to you that "Sharia law" is not inherently redundant as suggest. Sharia is the Arabic word for way or path, and there are diverse interpretations within Islam on what that entails. "

Yeah, and Islam also means "peace" as they keep telling us. And "jihad" means "struggle." LOLZ. Me thinks they doth protest too much, when they make these "explanations."

Too bad that nearly every war today is fought by muslims, where they are killing other muslims (who they consider infidels) or other ethnic/religious groups.

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ASCHOPS

3:38 PM ET

July 26, 2011

The anti-jihadist movement

The anti-jihadist movement has nothing to do with defending the rights of gays and women. Calling attention to Islam's least palatable aspects is but a distraction - conscious or not - of the real issue. Breivik is just an illustration of that mindset: by accusing Islam of being a religion of hate, as he often did, he was doing nothing but to distract others - and perhaps himself too - from his own hatred. It was the way he found to stereotype and demonize others without giving up on his righteous facade.

The anti-jihadist movement is nothing but the manifestation of the very human and very old hostility that native peoples feel toward immigrants. The US itself is boiling with anti-immigrant hatred. But this certainly isn't because the US's illegal immigrants don't respect the US's "cherished" values of tolerance and democracy (for instance, US Hispanics are more pro-gay than both White and Black Americans). I'm sure the likes of Breivik would be hating on others minorities - no matter how Western-minded they are - if only they departed from Norway's traditional demographics in some way or another. Intellectual justifications are nothing but an excuse for some very raw feelings.

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ARAVAY

4:07 PM ET

July 26, 2011

What an over-generalized statement

there is anti-immigrant feelings everywhere, true. However, the anti-jihadist movement does not reflect the same "they are taking our jobs" anti-immigrant sentiment in the US or other places. It clearly reflects the real cultural differences and issues such as violence that muslims bring to Europe.

In France, the majority of people being arrested and in prison are muslims. In Sweden, the majority of rapes are now being committed by muslims. In addition, there is a clear cultural clash, not see in the US or elsewhere with immigrants. In Europe, the muslims reject the liberalism if it is used in a way they dislike. They love the social benefits, which they don't pay into. But, they hate freedom of speech if it means someone can speak ill of their profit mohamed. It's a bunch of people trying to have it both ways, and being very vocal about it. That obviously pisses people off.

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BOYTHREEONE

6:34 PM ET

July 26, 2011

In response to NSC

It is "extreme right" and bigoted to characterize a complex and many-faceted religious practice with hostile, simplistic, one-dimensional, accusatory and denigrating terms. There are as many ways to interpret and practice Islam as there are people who identify as Islamic, just as there are infinite variations of Christianity, Buddhism, Judaism and any other religious ideology. Islamic people aren't clones, as your analysis suggests. Your description of Islam and your "encounters" with Islamic people are one-sided. Just as there are gay Christians, there are also gay Islamic people. And Islamic women in positions of authority. And Islamic people allied with Jewish ones. And Islamic people who are loving and caring and absolutely amazing. The fact that you've never encountered any of these people is a testament to your own close-mindedness, not evidence that all followers of Islam are detestable.The world is a bigger, more varied place than what you present. Being open to this truth, and grateful for it, is a liberal ideology.

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NSC LOS ANGELES

7:39 PM ET

July 26, 2011

Oh my...

Quite a bit to respond to here. I'm a bit pressed work-wise but to the poster above, don't assume my work on this issue is based upon anecdotal evidence. I've been researching this issue for years, have had the pleasure of speaking with many of its leading thinkers. I've read multiple translations of the Koran and have read many of the hadiths. I've documented the stories of non-Muslims who have lived in Muslim nations and experienced Islam's brutality firsthand.

As for painting all Muslims with one brush, there is a tremendous amount of consistency in action, particularly around the establishment of sharia "family" courts and segregation into specific neighborhoods which eventually become no-go zones. That said, are there Muslims living in western nations who are beneficial to their host countries? Definitely, I can think of many personal friends and even cohorts in the counter-jihad movement; people who I believe are great citizens and great people. Shocking as you may find this, there are Muslims in the counter-jihad movement, I know of two personally and many more "moderates" who acknowledge the reality of Islam in the west.

By the way, the counter-jihad movement is completely dedicated to preserving the hard-won rights of gays and women, it's that simple and you should study the movement before you speak so out of turn. Read Spencer, Hirsi Ali, Wilders, etc. etc. - all of these leading lights hold gay and womens' rights as central to the movement. Different people and cultures are welcome in the west and most in the counter-jihad reflect that sentiment. The line is drawn when a culture whose god-given guiding principals are the opprression of women and the murder of homosexuals.

You can continue to stick your head in the sand and ignore the glaring fact that, while multiculturalism by and large works extremely well in western nations, this successful model falls apart when Islam is introduced. It is a unique religion and political system which, unlike other faiths, dictates that Islam be established by the faithful as the ruling law of the land. I'm sorry that these facts upset you but they are facts. I would encourage you to learn about Islam before you lump it in with other benign religions, you will no doubt be shocked by what you find. I'd be happy to provide a reading list.

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NSC LOS ANGELES

7:49 PM ET

July 26, 2011

One more thing...

Claiming that liberals have some sort of monopoly on the truth or free thinking only reveals how deeply unaware of your own biases you actually are. Liberalism/conservativism are simply two poles along a spectrum of systematic bias. Rejecting both is the only slim hope of acheiving anything resembling a fair or balanced perspective.

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MRJS1G

6:08 AM ET

July 27, 2011

Re: Re: PECHORIN

"Most people who try and present themselves as authorities"
- Oh, so quoting something from an online dictionary is now an attempt at being authoritative? Please, the fact that you believe my post is an attempt at sounding anything remotely superior to you tells me a lot more about your inability to define words than the principles I'm driving at.

"better than to fill their sentences with lengthy and unrelated parentheticals."
- I don't know if it's just me, but 3 in the morning isn't the best time to beseech somebody to dot their i's and cross their t's. I hate spending excessive time on non-essential task; thus, I don't do much of a second read and only write in order to get my points across, not to impress. Clearly, you think different. Perhaps I should write with indents and leave a proper bibliography at the end?

Wait. First, you accuse me of pedantry and then you commence to indulge in said action? Talk about contradictions.

I don't know where your knowledge of Shari'a comes from (hopefully not Wikipedia), but it explicitly means "Islamic Law" - this is a universal fact and the addition of "law" is akin to saying something the lines of "completely extirpate". It's superfluous.

Yes, Shari'a could mean "way" or "thought" - that's not what I hoped to explain. At its most rudimentary definition, it means "Islamic law" and this later branches out to other, more sophisticated concepts like the ones mentioned above.

No, re-read what I wrote. I took issue with how you mis-interpreted "NSC"'s intent, which seemed to be the following: that Mr. Archer was being too vague in his characterizations of "counter-jihadists" and how simply because one is critical of Islam, one is sweepingly marginalized as a "counter-jihadist" (according to Mr. Archer). That was my entire point - that you were being wholly unfair to "NSC" by misconstruing her intent.

"was clever since I was a teenager"
- So if you thought something was clever as a teenager, you assume that it's not clever now? Why must you be so self-deprecating, man?

What's your definition of an "anti-jihadist"? It seems to be a term whose extreme vagueness you love to exploit. First it's a psychopath who murdered 91 people in Norway and now it's a Republican congressman? If it comes down to this comparison, I hope you are able to discern how asinine such a comparison is (and that I won't have to spell this out for you too).

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COUNTCHOCULA1011

3:40 PM ET

July 25, 2011

When you say your entire way of life is going to be destroyed...

...that Western civilization as a whole is under direct assault, what do you expect? Some people certainly might confine their activities to mere protests and the like, but a sizable chunk is going to see these as useless political theater. As such, they're going to take action like this conservative Christian terrorist did.

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DRIZZT

11:32 AM ET

July 26, 2011

Breivik was not a Christian.

Breivik never claimed to be a Christian. It is not in his writings and he did not attend church. He openly criticized Christianity. The propaganda by the left-wing, anti-Christian press latched onto a quote from a policeman that was speculating about Breivik's motives. He had nothing to go on other than early reports of Breivik's anti-Islamic attitudes and Breivik's race. The New York Times perpetuated this without any evidence to back it up because they want to equate Breivik with Tim McVeigh. This, in the NYT's editorial mind, equates Christians to Islamic terrorists. The left-wing press gleefully joined in promoting this libel against Christianity. There is no world-wide Christian terror network equivalent to Al-qada. Christians speak out against the violence of any terrorist, unlike the many Muslims that danced in the streets after 9/11. Now, however, that the truth of Breivik's motives are reviewed and spread via the internet, does any of the perpetrators of the lie print a retraction? Not on your life. They will continue to imply he was influenced by Christianity and, therefore, tar Christianity with Breivik's abominable actions.

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ENGLANDUK

4:55 PM ET

July 25, 2011

Really?

I do not think that you can say that the killer was solely radicalised by what he did online. I think it takes more than that. SEO In Kent for you website needs.

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NANANG

7:21 PM ET

July 26, 2011

yes, I agree with you ...

yes, I agree with you ... radicals not only about the murder, update news Movie and Software

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JAMSB3

5:09 PM ET

July 25, 2011

Is This A Trend? Yup. Expect More. Breivik is america.

The net is like the Bible; my dream, your nightmare. I read the first 30 pages of Breivik/Berwick's opus without knowing it was the shooter. X, y, and z, say Marxism and Islamism conspire to thwart white male domestic bliss. Boohoo. Wait a second, white male bliss is the foundation of civilization.

A Dog Whisperer is required to divine why sick puppies like Breivik go wrong. Mommy, Daddy, where the hell are you? Blame the home and automatic weapons. Everything else is multiculturalism. Multiculturalism is what happens when dumb white males can't handle the truth.

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HOMOSAPIENS

5:55 PM ET

July 25, 2011

Call a spade a spade

“Right-wing extremist” is a euphemism for “Zionist extremist” in the context of Breivik’s motives. What you see with Breivik is Zionism in action, as articulated by Geller, Spencer and Pipes. Here, in the US, our home-grown Zionists are utterly un-American because, like Breivik, they reject our character as the most multi-cultural nation on earth....... the "melting pot". These Zionists want us to be an intolerent and hateful nation, full of anger and violence.
The mark of a Zionist is emotional adoration of Israel. The most dangerous of our Zionists are those in Congress. The most notable trait of Zionists is trying to silence those who criticize Israel's military occupation of Palestine. We, as voters, must purge our Congress of the anti-melting pot members. Get rid of them. DON'T VOTE ZIONIST IN 2012. If the Israelis want Zionism, and hate all Muslims, they can keep all their hate and murder to themselves. Not in America!!!

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DRIZZT

11:50 AM ET

July 26, 2011

HOMOSAPIENS is

You are nearly as nuts as Breivik. Your post proves it all. Hate Jews much?

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BENJAMINFRANKLIN

6:35 PM ET

July 25, 2011

Not really political

This is personal pathology disguised as politics. The killer will turn out to be either a paranoid schizophrenic or a narcissist who recently suffered a humiliation. He says he is an Islamophobe, but he didn't shoot Muslims. What he hated were his happy, successful, well adjusted peers - and that's who he killed.

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PECHORIN

8:30 PM ET

July 25, 2011

Really?

He wrote a 1,500 page political tract. He concocted an elaborate terror plot that required months of preparation, including the purchase of a farm. He learned how to make complex bombs and appears to have been working towards the completion of his plan for years. He specifically chose political targets; government buildings and a party youth organization. Your alternate explanation is so at odds with the existing evidence that it is totally beyond belief. I cannot fathom how you can so glibly dismiss this clear and present danger, it's totally irresponsible and makes me think that you have ulterior motives.

The man has told us in great detail why he carried out his acts; it is only fools and those sympathetic to his cause he want to deny the plain truth of his motives.

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NOASHA

10:45 PM ET

July 25, 2011

plagiarised beliefs

ABB's manifesto was a compilation of other writers without their knowledge. Blogger Fjordman was also major contributor to his ideas.
A nationalist who kill his own people and their children or a narcissist's obsessive need for revenge?
"I’m not going to pretend I’m a very religious person as that would be a lie. I’ve always been very pragmatic and influenced by my secular surroundings and environment … "
"If praying will act as an additional mental boost/soothing it is the pragmatical thing to do. I guess I will find out...If there is a God I will be allowed to enter heaven as all other martyrs for the Church in the past. " P1344
Not one of the great thinkers.

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BRAJEWKA

8:23 PM ET

July 25, 2011

Al Jazeera heard you

Quo usque tandem abutere, Toby Archer, patientia nostra?Quam diu etiam furor iste tuus nos eludet? Quem ad finem sese effrenata iactabit audacia? What is next, a repetition of ancient defamation claiming that the Jews poison wells and drink the blood of Christian children? Are you going to blame Israel for 9/11. Yours is the most irresponsible, journalism. I suspect that you went to J school with Sarah Palin. No, I am not a neocon. I just happen to hate the behavoior of writers who abuse freedom of speech to promote vile canards about or any ethno-religious groups.

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MRJS1G

4:53 AM ET

July 26, 2011

Mis-Attribution

Reading through the comments, it seems as though people are impetuously attributing the blame to the bloggers who this Breivik cites as if they intended for him to traverse down the path he ultimately did. Historical precedents inform us that we should be extremely wary to apply this type of knee-jerk rationale (or lack of it).

Examples are as follows. If challenged, I will provide explanations; I find examples to have a more profound impact when the audience comes to its own conclusions, though.

Nietzsche: Hitler - morals and human superiority.
Darwin: Eugenics / "Social Darwinism" - science and the unfounded "survival of the fittest"

Simply because one draws his / her conclusions from somebody or something *does not* mean that the cited source commissioned or even approved of said action.

From the blog which Mr. Archer seems to have (hastily) linked: "In no sane world does opposing terror attacks on the West logically lead to carrying out terror attacks on the West."

So, Mr. Archer and audience: simply because a delusional, possibly psychopathic, and educated terrorist commits a lone attack in a peaceful country quotes and refers to figures who superficially *seem* to corroborate the killer's position does not mean that they actually *do*.

Keep that in mind when attempting to defame people and their work of which you patently know nothing (or very little) about.

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OBTEL

4:58 AM ET

July 26, 2011

More propaganda...

Since there is no trace of any muslim thread in the norway scene, the writer is trying to find one anywhere.

Quote from an old article: "It has been shown that chimpanzees will go to war to protect their territory. ... aggression toward others who don't share one's beliefs is nothing more than war over intellectual territory; religious faith is an intellectual line in the air. I concluded by saying that the religious extremists must be right about Darwin: clearly, there are no signs of evolution here."
http://goo.gl/mUsrA

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SDASGATYSF

8:25 AM ET

July 26, 2011

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SLOUPOUK

8:36 AM ET

July 26, 2011

Great News

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ARAVAY

11:37 AM ET

July 26, 2011

Muslims preach violence in Europe

LONDON —
He's called Sheik Terra.

With a Koran in one hand and pistol in the other, the British rapper calls for the murder of non-Muslims, including several world leaders, on a videotape.

The video is well known in one London mosque, whose imam — or leader — is accused of setting up a terrorist training camp in Oregon and whose followers don't like Western media.

Abu Hamza (search), who lost two hands and an eye in Afghanistan, is in jail now but other extremists from among Britain's two million Muslims continue to preach violence, veiling the message to take advantage of some of Europe's most liberal freedom-of-speech laws.

"We cannot tolerate a crocodile in our bedroom," said Sheik Omar Bakri. "U.S. forces in Muslim countries are crocodiles in our bedrooms. So we are not going to give them ice cream."

Bakri says the terrorists who staged the Sept. 11, 2001, (search) attacks on the United States are magnificent and Westerners in Arab lands need to be killed by any means necessary. He makes the threats with a smile.

"If we use violence, you will forget the name of your mother and father," he said.

The drawing power of the extremists, especially among the youth, has posed a challenge for mainstream Muslim leaders across Europe.

Part of Britain's problem is that it can't provide native-trained imams; more than 90 percent are foreigners with very limited training or, some like Hamza, have none at all.

To prevent more mosques from being hijacked, London's Muslim college is trying to educate home-grown British imams but the voices of moderation struggle to be heard over media-savvy terrorists.

When a hostage gets beheaded in Iraq, the images spread through this community almost instantly. It is a real mix of barbarity and technology.

The beheading of British engineer Kenneth Bigley (search) in Iraq went from videotape to the Internet, then from cell phone to cell phone, bringing a smile from one young British Muslim who says he knows who the real killers are.

"They are not Muslims. They are Jews," the young man said.

An old message of hatred for a new generation of consumers who can spread murder across a continent with the push of a button, or a song and a laugh.

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NSC LOS ANGELES

12:02 PM ET

July 27, 2011

Arvay

I have enjoyed your writing on this site for some time now, I tip my hat to you sir (or madame)! If you find yourself in the LA area, desperately in need of a cocktail, give me a shout.

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OLSENPETRA

12:30 PM ET

July 26, 2011

get best here

I just paid $22.87 for an iPad2-64 GB and my girlfriend loves her Panasonic Lumix GF 1 Camera that we got for $38.76 there arriving tomorrow by UPS. I will never pay such expensive retail prices in stores again. Especially when I also sold a 40 inch LED TV to my boss for $675 which only cost me $ 62.81 to buy. Here is the website we use to get it all from, CentShack. com

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GHSAMSON

12:58 PM ET

July 26, 2011

I think it's almost certain

I think it's almost certain that the inter web will result in more of these types of extremist actions. The internet makes it all too easy for people to closet themselves up in groups of like minder people and radicalize themselves

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ISABELDELOSRIOS

3:26 PM ET

July 26, 2011

Propaganda

Is no one seeing the propaganda here?...

"To do so requires an appreciation of a transatlantic movement that often calls itself "the counter-jihad." As his writings indicate, Breivik is clearly a product of this predominantly web-based community of anti-Muslim, anti-government, and anti-immigration bloggers, writers, and activists"

It looks like they may be using this to clamp down on free speech online.

- Isabel De Los Rios

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BENEDICTUS

12:40 AM ET

July 27, 2011

Censored DHS report available on-line now

This report by the US Dept. of Homeland Security on domestic rightwing extremism was withdrawn after opposition by some conservative
members of the US Congress -- it is still available here:

http://www.fas.org/irp/eprint/rightwing.pdf

And here is the NYTimes story on the censored report:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/25/us/25debate.html?_r=1&pagewanted=2

"In 2009, when the Department of Homeland Security produced a report, “Rightwing Extremism,” suggesting that the recession and the election of an African-American president might increase the threat from white supremacists, conservatives in Congress strongly objected. Janet Napolitano, the homeland security secretary, quickly withdrew the report and apologized for what she said were its flaws.

"Daryl Johnson, the Department of Homeland Security analyst who was the primary author of the report, said in an interview that after he left the department in 2010, the number of analysts assigned to non-Islamic militancy of all kinds was reduced to two from six....

"The killings in Norway “could easily happen here,” he said. The Hutaree, an extremist Christian militia in Michigan accused last year of plotting to kill police officers and planting bombs at their funerals, had an arsenal of weapons larger than all the Muslim plotters charged in the United States since the Sept. 11 attacks combined, he said."

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THEOM

12:42 PM ET

July 27, 2011

same old

A hatchet job, as to be expected, though not necessarily by FP.

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