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Mexico - Coat of arms

Last modified: 2001-10-13 by juan manuel gabino villascán
Keywords: mexico | america | aztec | eagle | snake | cactus | blood | cortes |
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[Mexico - Coat of arms]
by Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, August 31, 2001


See also:

Golden version of the Mexican Coat of Arms

[Mexico - Golden Coat of arms]
by Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, September 16, 20011

This Coat of arms could be seen at the "Archivo General de la Nación". Note the ribbon remains tricolor, while stone, lake and eagle's grasps are grey.
Such Coat of arms are use mainly by President, State Governors and State Secretaries.

Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán June 11, 2001.


History and meaning of the Mexican Coat of Arms

The State Emblem was first adopted in 1823 and the eagle and snake have served ever since the Emblem or Arms of then successive republics and empires. It will be immediately apparent that the three hundred years of Spanish rule have been judiciously ignored, and in fact the Emblem recalls an old Indian legend: The Aztec people were guided by Huitzilopochtli to seek a place where an eagle landed on a prickly-pear cactus, eating a snake... After hundreds of years of wandering they found the sign on a small swampy island in Lake Texcoco. Their new home they named Tenochtitlan (“Place of the Prickly Pear Cactus”). In A.D. 1325 they built a city on the site of the island in the lake; this is now the centre of Mexico City. The emblem was re-approved in 1934 and slightly modified in 1968; the plant is a nopal cactus.

Rita Ramirez, 16 Jan 1998, and Edward Mooney, 28 Apr 1998

The Coat of Arms was designed by Francisco Eppens Helguera, a famous Mexican Architect born in San Luis Potosí. The new arms were granted by Decree of October 18, 1966, and officially adopted on September 16, 1968. Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán June 11, 2001


Official description of the Mexican Coat of Arms

The coat of arms are described in the Article 2 of the "Ley sobre el Escudo, la Bandera y el Himno Nacionales" (Law on the National Coat of Arms, Flag, and Anthem) that reads:

The National Coat of Arms is featured by an Mexican eagle exposing its left profile, the upper part of the wings in a level higher than plume and slightly displayed in a battle attitude; with the sustenation plumage downwards touching to the tail whose feathers are arranged in natural fan. It puts its left grasp on a bloomed nopal that is born in a rock that emerges from a lake. It is grasping with the right grasp and the beack, in attitude of eat, a curved serpent, so that it harmonizes with the whole. Several "pencas" of the nopal grow to the sides. Two branches, one of encino to the front of the eagle and another one of laurel opposed, form a lower semicircle and they are united by a ribbon divided in three strips that, when the National Coat of Arms is represented in natural colors, correspond to those of the National flag.

When the National Shield reproduces in the reverse side of the National Flag, the Mexican Eagle will appear standing in its right grasp, holding with the left one and the beack the curved serpent.

See image bellow:

[Mexico - Reverse side of the Coat of Arms] [Reverse side of the arms]
by Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 06 April 2001

[Mexico - Reverse side of the Coat of Arms golden version] [Reverse side of the arms]
by Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, September 16, 2001

Source:
Decreto por el que se reforman los artículo 2o, 18 y 55, y se adicionan los artículos 54 Bis,... de la ley sobre el Escudo, la Bandera y el Himno Nacionales
Issued in DOF on May 9, 1995.

Quoted by Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán June 11, 2001 'use strict';