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Business | November 25, 2007
Steven B. Smith, president of Finicity, a company offering online money-management tools to consumers and small businesses, debunks four financial myths: Myth 1: It's always best to open a savings account at a brick-and-mortar bank. Actually, you'll probably get a much higher yield on your money by going online, according to Smith. Many online savings/money accounts offer annual percentage yields of around 5 percent compared with 0.2 percent at some traditional banks, says Smith.
FEATURES
By Greg Morago; Courant Food Critic | February 21, 2008
When there's a page on a menu dedicated to explaining the chef's background or the menu concept, I usually roll my eyes. Worse are glossaries of ingredients, pronunciation guides or long-winded stories about the origin of the restaurant's name. Those are usually met with exasperated groans. So when I saw a page on Amelia's menu dedicated to its origins (and the verses of a song, to boot), you can imagine my reaction. After reading the story behind Amelia's, however, and after two dinner visits to the charming Simsbury restaurant, I've changed my fussy tune.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Korky Vann; Special To The Courant | December 11, 1997
Whether you favor a Charlie Brown straggler or a Rockefeller regal, whether you cut it down yourself or buy it at the corner lot, finding the perfect Christmas tree can be a challenge. Pick one too big, and you're doing emergency tree surgery on the front porch; too small, and it's listing under the weight of your tree topper and silver bells. According to the National Christmas Tree Association, more than 37 million American families will celebrate the holidays with a live tree.
NEWS
By Jeffrey B. Cohen; Courant Staff Writer | February 28, 2008
The city council has approved leasing the Old State House to the state of Connecticut for 99 years, a key step in a plan that preservationists hope will guarantee the future of the historic structure. "It's a terrific thing, absolutely, no doubt about it," said Kate Steinway, executive director of the Connecticut Historical Society. "It needs care and feeding. These old buildings are a drain, and they do take a lot of money. It's got a slate roof, it's got paint that's peeling all over, and it really is the jewel of Hartford."
NEWS
By Warren Goldstein Warren Goldstein, Author Of ``william Sloane Coffin Jr.: A Holy Impatience'' (yale University Press, 2004), Is Chairman Of The History Department At The University Of Hartford. A Longer Version Of This Article Originally Appeared In The May/june 2004 Yale Alumni Magazine. | August 1, 2004
In January 2009, Yale graduates will have occupied the Oval Office for 20 consecutive years: George H.W. Bush, Class of 1948, Bill Clinton '73 J.D., George W. Bush '68 and, possibly, John Kerry '66. No university has ever had a 20-year run. Harvard's FDR, all by himself, is the nearest contender. And last winter there were even more Yale graduates in the running -- Sen. Joe Lieberman '64, '67 L.L.B., and Howard Dean '71. Ought we to chalk it up to historical accident? Or did some deeper set of factors produce this extraordinary run of candidates and presidents?
NEWS
By Tom Condon | February 3, 2008
I was kicking around the oft-mentioned phenomenon of young people leaving the state. Some must do it for jobs. I'm sure many feel the need to go to Boston to party, or can't find inexpensive digs, or need to tour with a ska band. But I wonder if more people in their 20s would stay if they were more attuned to the history, the place, the stories of Connecticut. If you know who was here, and what they did, if you can see where they worked and lived, doesn't that hook you? Once you know about, say, Mark Twain, the Leather Man and the New Haven Railroad, doesn't that pique your interest?
FEATURES
By Alan Greenberg | January 16, 2005
"We have to stick to our core principles," Patriots linebacker Mike Vrabel says about the task of stopping the Colts today. "You can try a few [new wrinkles], but if you rely on gimmickry, 99 percent of the time you only end up [messing] yourself [up]." Under Bill Belichick, the Patriots defenders don't do many outlandish things. But they have sometimes employed successful strategies that other teams didn't have the gumption or talent to pull off. Feb. 2, 2002, Super Bowl XXXVI: Patriots 20, Rams 17 The Patriots, 14-point underdogs to a Kurt Warner-Marshall Faulk Rams team billed as The Greatest Show on Turf, pulled off the greatest Super Bowl upset since the pre-merger days when the Jets stunned the Colts in Super Bowl III. On the Louisiana Superdome artificial turf that was their favorite footing, the small and whippet-fast Rams receivers would win any track meet.
FEATURES
By Anne Farrow; Special To The Courant | November 29, 2007
"Choose one not very fleshy on the breast but fat in the rump." That's Amelia Simmons' advice on how to choose a goose, from "American Cookery," published in Hartford in 1796. When Jeff Bogue was growing up on his family's farm at the Haddam edge of Middletown, goose was always the bird for his family's holiday meals. Bogue now owns a landscaping business, but he still lives on the farm that his ancestors established, and just for fun, he raises a few geese. "They're interesting, and they have character, not like turkeys," says Bogue.
FEATURES
By Kathleen Megan; Courant Staff Writer | October 20, 2007
OK, so you're not a famous television star -- like Ellen DeGeneres and her erstwhile puppy, Iggy -- but what should you do if your pet isn't working out? The entire world knows what DeGeneres did when Iggy was causing problems at her home. She passed the adopted dog along to her hairdresser whose children quickly became smitten with Iggy. She thought she'd done well by the puppy, but Mutts and Moms -- the animal rescue agency -- said otherwise. The agency said its contract states that if an animal is not working out, the owner must return it to Mutts and Moms.
NEWS
December 13, 2007
Ray Dalio wants to put more Thanksgiving into Christmas. The Greenwich hedge fund executive, listed as the fourth-wealthiest Connecticut resident and the 82nd-richest American, is urging people, through newspaper ads, to eschew the "monthlong compulsion to buy something." His message: Make charitable donations instead. He is not the first to suggest that Christmas is too commercialized. He's right that many of us are "pressed and stressed" at this time of year. Writing a check would be a whole lot easier than fighting crowds at the mall.
NEWS
By Rick Green Rick Green's Column Appears On Tuesdays And Fridays. He Can Be Reached At Rgreen@courant.com | February 20, 2007
I know you don't have a clue about hedge funds. Neither does nearly anyone else, including the government. But Connecticut -- actually, Fairfield County -- has joined London and New York in leading this $1.3 trillion industry, luring fund managers fond of our exclusive suburbs. Their firms pour huge sums into financial markets worldwide, making risky investments that generate substantial return. A Greenwich developer recently purchased a former 150,000-square-foot corporate headquarters for $130 million and will turn it into an "ultra-luxury" home for hedge funds.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey Andrew Leckey Is A Tribune Media Services Columnist. | May 27, 2007
Heard about the average investors who put every cent they had into sector funds for years, brilliantly switching from technology to telecommunications to gold to utilities, amassing a fortune along the way? No? Well, that's because they don't exist. The truth is, putting everything into individual market sectors and trying to time them accurately is dangerous even for the savviest pros. Because of the risks in concentrating too much money in one area, sector investing should, at best, represent only a portion of an individual's portfolio.
NEWS
By Eric Gershon; Courant Staff Writer | February 23, 2008
In case you've forgotten how ugly recessions can get, consider the number 159,000: That's how many jobs Connecticut lost between 1989 and 1993, the era of the last major national recession. Those lost jobs represent more people than the current population of any Connecticut city, six times the in-state workforce of United Technologies Corp., the state's biggest private employer, and more than 1.5 times the state's net population growth since mid-2000. "We really got hammered in the early '90s," said University of Connecticut economist Fred Carstensen.
NEWS
By William Weir; Courant Staff Writer | February 3, 2007
Winning in both taste and price, McDonald's and its coffee beat out three other giants of corporate java, including Starbucks, in the March issue of Consumer Reports. Though Consumer Reports takes issue with McDonald's "slightly icky" promotional slogan -- "wakeup and smell your life" -- the magazine declared the coffee to be "decent and moderately strong." Its medium-size cup, at $1.35, was also the cheapest of the four that were tested. "Although it lacked the subtle top notes needed to make it rise and shine, it had no flaws," was the magazine's qualified praise.
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