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By Story By FRANK RIZZO |Photo By STEPHEN DUNN | February 28, 2010
'There's no avoiding mothers, even if you try," says actress Amy Irving. "After all, everyone's got one, or at least started out with one." The maternal subject at the moment for the Oscar-nominated and Obie-winning film and stage actress is obvious. Irving is in the ensemble production of "Motherhood Out Loud," which is premiering at Hartford Stage, now in previews and facing critics on Wednesday. The work, directed by Lisa Peterson, is a collection of 15 pieces by 16 writers on the subject of motherhood, with stories that range from the comedic to the serious.
ENTERTAINMENT
By FRANK RIZZO | April 1, 2010
Tom Sawyer can bring out the kid in anyone. This certainly applies to four young actors featured in the world premiere of a new stage adaptation of the Mark Twain classic that begins performances tonight at Hartford Stage. As adults, they have to find their inner kid again Though Tom's age is vague in the book, Twain experts say that Tom is about 9 when the book starts and 13 when it ends. Twain is also non-specific with Becky Thatcher and Huck Finn's ages, but figure they are around the same as Tom. All of this is a dilemma for stage productions that require actors of sufficient level of skill and presence to carry the story but who also look, well, young.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2010
It could be the mother of all shows. After all, "Motherhood Out Loud" has a universal maternal theme and everyone has a mother, no? The world premiere, which is a collection of pieces by writers such as Theresa Rebeck, David Cale, Rinne Groff, Leslie Ayvaszian, Jessica Goldberg, Beth Henley and Lisa Loomer, begins performances Wednesday at Hartford Stage, 50 Church St. Other writers include Lameece Issaq, Deborah Zoe Laufer, Michele...
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN HOOD, Special to The Courant | January 22, 2010
With an imaginatively rich, splendidly acted, visually and sonically gorgeous "Gee's Bend," Hartford Stage introduces two talents to New England audiences: director Hana S. Sharif and emerging playwright Elyzabeth Gregory Wilder. Sharif holds the title of artistic producer at Hartford Stage, where she has overseen many readings of new plays. But this production marks her full-fledged directorial debut. In "Gee's Bend," her all-encompassing theatrical sensibility is made evident by the inspired contributions of her collaborators and cast members.
ENTERTAINMENT
By FRANK RIZZO, The Hartford Courant | April 1, 2010
Horton Foote's epic "The Orphans' Home Cycle", which had its world premiere last fall at Hartford Stage, received Thursday a Lucille Lortel Award nomination for best off-Broadway play of the year. Also winning nominations from that production are Rui Rita for lighting design and John Gromada for sound. Gordon Edelstein artistic director of Long Wharf Theatre was also a nominee for best direction for the Long Wharf Theatre production of "The Glass Menagerie," which was transferred from New Haven to the Roundabout Theatre Company.
NEWS
August 10, 1997
Self-esteem? Raftsmen and frontiersmen on the Mississippi in the 1800s didn't have the problem. At any given moment one might throw his head back and yell out: "I'm fresh from the backwoods, half-horse, half-alligator, a little touched with the snapping turtle. I can wade the Mississippi, leap the Ohio, ride upon a streak of lightning and slip without a scratch down a honey locust. I can whip my weight in wildcats and if any gentleman pleases, for a $10 bill he may throw in a panther hug a bear too close for comfort, and eat any man opposed to Andy Jackson."
ENTERTAINMENT
By - Kyle Swartz | March 13, 2008
The Hartford Stage will present "Trans Plantations," written and performed by Janis Astor del Valle, on Wednesday at 8 p.m. The show explores the cultural and sexual struggle of the Bronx-born Puerto Rican playwright (pictured) after she relocates to rural Connecticut at the age 7. She performs the play in a straitjacket. The show is directed by Carolyn Kirsch. Tickets are $10 and includes a cash bar and Puerto Rican cuisine beginning at 6:30 p.m. Information is available at the Love Makes a Family website, lmfct.
NEWS
December 12, 1994
The Hartford Stage Company, 50 Church St., will present Robert Alexander's "I Ain't Yo Uncle: The New Jack Revisionist Uncle Tom's Cabin" tonight at 7. The free performance is part of the "Voices" play reading series. Two speakers from the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center will participate in the post-performance discussion. For more information, call 527- 5151. The City Wide Prayer & Fasting Group will meet Tuesday at 4:40 p.m. at Keney Tower Park, at Albany Avenue and Main Street.
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NEWS
By CAROLE GOLDBERG | Special to The Courant | April 1, 2010
He grew up in Hannibal, Mo., died in Redding and rests in Elmira, N.Y., but Hartford has the happy distinction of being the city in which Mark Twain completed his masterpieces. Twain, who was born Samuel L. Clemens on Nov. 30, 1835, died on April 21, 1910. He lived with his family on Farmington Avenue in Hartford from 1874 to 1891, and it was there that he finished his comic triumph, "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer," in 1876 and in 1884 published his "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," still widely regarded as one of the greatest American novels.
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NEWS
April 1, 2010
A new generation can learn about the groundbreaking career of Jackie Robinson, the first African American to play in major league baseball. "Most Valuable Player: Jackie Robinson" (portrayed by Rick L. Spivey, right) is a drama for grades 4 and older to be presented on Tuesday at 7 p.m. at the Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts, 166 Capitol Ave., Hartford. Robinson broke baseball's color line in 1947 by joining the Brooklyn Dodgers. Tickets are $12 for children, $18 for adults. Information: 860-987-5900 and www.bushnell.
ENTERTAINMENT
By FRANK RIZZO | April 1, 2010
Horton Foote's epic "The Orphans' Home Cycle", which had its world premiere last fall at Hartford Stage, received Thursday a Lucille Lortel Award nomination for best off-Broadway play of the year. Also winning nominations from that production are Rui Rita for lighting design and John Gromada for sound. Gordon Edelstein artistic director of Long Wharf Theatre was also a nominee for best direction for the Long Wharf Theatre production of "The Glass Menagerie," which was transferred from New Haven to the Roundabout Theatre Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By FRANK RIZZO | April 1, 2010
Tom Sawyer can bring out the kid in anyone. This certainly applies to four young actors featured in the world premiere of a new stage adaptation of the Mark Twain classic that begins performances tonight at Hartford Stage. As adults, they have to find their inner kid again Though Tom's age is vague in the book, Twain experts say that Tom is about 9 when the book starts and 13 when it ends. Twain is also non-specific with Becky Thatcher and Huck Finn's ages, but figure they are around the same as Tom. All of this is a dilemma for stage productions that require actors of sufficient level of skill and presence to carry the story but who also look, well, young.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Rizzo | April 1, 2010
Some Broadway legends this summer, then a world premiere, a recent Broadway comedy and an August Wilson play, highlight Hartford Stage's 2010-11 season. Tony Award winners Chita Rivera and Ben Vereen will make up Hartford Stage 's "SummerStage," with each star presenting solo shows back to back with one-week limited runs at the Roberts Theater at the Kingswood-Oxford School in West Hartford, a 10-minute drive from Hartford. Hartford Stage is presenting summer shows there because it will undergo renovations at its downtown theater after "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" ends May 9. Because Hartford Stage wanted to continue its summer program, which began in 1999, it decided to present the shows at K-O. Rivera will play there June 22 to 27 and Vereen July 6 to 11. Tickets for both shows are on sale.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Rizzo | March 25, 2010
Rallying the troops with Tea Party enthusiasm, Michael Price told a crowd of more than 100 arts supporters at the State Capitol Wednesday "to go to the candidates this year and say, 'Where do you stand on the arts? What will you do for us if you are elected?'" Price, chairman of the state Commission on Culture and Tourism and executive director of Goodspeed Musicals for the past 41 years, was speaking during Arts Advocacy Day . Arts leaders were lobbying legislators to reject the governor's midterm budget-adjustment proposal to further cut funding to the commission — which gives grants to scores of arts and heritage groups in the state — by 38 percent.
NEWS
By Java: MaryEllen Fillo | March 19, 2010
Sweet Baby James (Taylor)'s sweet baby sister, Kate Taylor, stayed in Connecticut this week, and it didn't cost her a dime. She and two girlfriends crashed at Canton's "Casa de Paul Marte and Scot Haney." The Hartford Stage marketing guy and WFSB personality were more than glad to accommodate her and the gal pals with accommodations that included the choice of any guest bedroom in the house. "She's a good friend of my cousin and we told her if she was ever in the area to feel free to stay with us," explained Marte, as he and Haney made their place girl-friendly for Taylor, Marte's cousin, Beth Larsen, and third girlfriend Linda McCarthy.
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