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Frequently Asked Questions
10/4/2006

  1. What is the Dnghu Group?
  2. Why was the Dnghu Group created?
  3. Is the Dnghu Group a Corporation?
  4. Who are the members of the Dnghu Group?
  5. I want to help. How can I?
  6. How do I join the Dnghu Group?
  7. I am considering starting an Europaio project, can I?
  8. What is Europaio about?
  9. What is Europaio not about?
  10. This is the Europaio-based projects' central, so, why can't I find a single page written in Europaio?


1. What is the Dnghu Group?
The Dnghu Group is a non-profit organization provisionally headquartered in Badajoz, Spain, whose main aim is to provide EU citizens with a national language to facilitate communication and trade.



2. Why was the Dnghu Group created?
The Dnghu Group was formed primarily to:
  1. provide a framework for open, collaborative language development projects by supplying hardware, communication and business infrastructure;
  2. create an independent legal entity which can be funded by public institutions and private companies and individuals, and be assured that those resources will be used for the public benefit and do not enrich its founders;
  3. provide a means for individual volunteers to be sheltered from intellectual property violations and from legal suits directed at the Foundation's projects; and,
  4. protect the 'Dnghu', 'Europaio' and 'Europaiom' brands, as applied to language products, from being abused by other individuals or organizations.


3. Is the Dnghu Group a Corporation?
No. We have no legal status for the moment, our resources are privately funded. There is, however, a private project aimed at providing a legal framework for the Group being studied at present by a Foundation related to the regional Government of Extremadura. Should they consider it a valuable project, our future legal shape will be that of a private Foundation.



4. Who are the members of the Dnghu Group?
There are currently two founding members, María Teresa Batalla and Carlos Quiles, as well as four permanent supporters, two distinguished scholars of the Extremadura University, experts in Library Science and Economics, and two English philologists, one of them with English citizenship.



5. I want to help. How can I?
Well, you know better than us how you could collaborate with our projects. Are you a software developer? a philologist? a server administrator? a politician? do you represent a local or regional authority that would be interested in funding us? are you rich?... Be it money or work, every help is indeed welcome, and we hope you can find enough opened projects to participate in.



6. How do I join the Dnghu Group?
If you are European and you could contribute in some special way to our projects, there is certainly a job for you at Dnghu. There are no paid jobs, though. To work for us right now means to give up a better job elsewhere and to dedicate yourself to the project for its future success alone, without even a promise of being somehow rewarded if we succeed. If you are still interested, please send us your curriculum vitae at jobs@dnghu.org.



7. I am considering starting an Europaio project, can I?
Yes. And no. You can do whatever you like with your time and money, while it doesn't confront our legitimate rights over Dnghu, Europaio or Europaiom brands, as well as our works' copyrights. If yours will be a project which follows our basic standards, and will not obtain illegitimate benefits from our works, please consider helping us grow united, and think about how difficult could it be for the Europaio language to be standardized if our efforts are split up in too many different projects; even though many of our contributors have different ideas about Europaio and Dnghu, we all try to collaborate with each other to succeed in our common objective. Nevertheless, if you still want to develop your own independent project, contact us if you think we would be interested in supporting or otherwise helping you.



8. What is Europaio about?
Europaio is the modern language based on an old language spoken by a prehistoric community, which is usually called Indo-European or Indo-Germanic -among other, lesser used names- by Indo-European (or IE) scholars. The Indo-European language we are referring to is the immediate common ancestor to many of modern European languages. If Latin is the mother of Romance languages, and (Proto-)Germanic that of the Germanic languages, then old Europaio is the mother of Latin and Germanic, i.e., modern languages' grandmother. Modern Europaio is thus a reconstruction based mainly on the common ancestor of the European languages, also called Northern Dialects, which include Germanic, Latin, Celtic, Baltic or Slavic, but do not include necessarily the Indo-Aryan or Iranian branches' features, for example. Its main goal is to substitute present-day linguae francae from third parties within Europe for a National Language which would be spoken by all as our own language.



9. What is Europaio not about?
Europaio is not about prehistoric Indo-European studies. It is not about uniting Iranians, Indians and Europeans with the rest of the Indo-European world against the other half. It is not about discovering the truth about the European Homeland. It is not about substituting EU Member States' regional or national languages. And it is certainly not about some invented Aryan or European race.



10. This is the Europaio-based projects' central, so, why can't I find a single page written in Europaio?
First and foremost, you wouldn't be able to understand it, and as this web site's main goal is informing others about our projects, it wouldn't be very clever for us to write it in a language only spoken by those who already know it. And secondly, Europaio is not still stable enough for us to write it here. We have provided some 'sandboxes' where everybody can write and read each others' Europaio texts, so that we obtain a final stable output. If we used Europaio in our writings, everybody would turn to us and our texts to support their ideas about the grammatical rules and the vocabulary. We want people and experts to develop the language freely, and to discuss all the possibilities without our influence. If we chose now to follow our rules without waiting for others' opinions, they would become probably unquestionably established standards in the future.




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