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Hollywood Boulevard

Named Prospect Avenue from 1887 to 1910, it wasn't until the town of Hollywood was annexed to the city of Los Angeles that the street undertook its famous moniker. In 1958, the Hollywood Walk of Fame was created to pay tribute to artists of note in the entertainment industry. (Source)
The color of the bridge is actually an orange vermillion called international orange. However, it earned its name because the bridge spans the Golden Gate Strait. Since 1937, the majestic bridge has been regarded as one of the most beautiful and most recognizable landmarks in the world. (Source)
Formerly Longacre Square, Times Square was renamed in 1904 after The New York Times moved its headquarters to the newly erected Times Building (now called One Times Square). Times Square is the world's most visited tourist attraction, bringing in around one million visitors on New Years Eve alone. (Source)
Hawaiian for "spouting waters," Waikiki became a tourist attraction in 1901 when its first hotel, the Moana Surfrider, was erected. Today, Waikiki remains Oahu’s most vibrant resort location with tourists flocking from around the world. (Source)
The Mall is an open-space national park surrounded by national monuments, memorials and museums. The Mall occupies the entire area between the Lincoln Memorial and the United States Capitol. (Source)
Lombard Street is famous for its one-way section, in which the roadway has eight sharp turns (or switchbacks), and has earned the street the distinction of being arguably the most crooked street in the world. The switchback design was instituted in 1922 in order to reduce the hill's natural 27% grade and increase the street's aesthetic. (Source)
Home of the dazzling lights, weekend trips, 24-hour strip joints, secrecy pacts, losing streaks and winning streaks, the Las Vegas Strip is a 4.2-mile (6.8 km) stretch of Las Vegas Boulevard. 19 of the world's 25 largest hotels by room count are on the Strip. Have an alibi ready. (Source)
The Space Needle was built for the 1962 World's Fair. Since, it has become an iconic Seattle landmark and one of the most recognizable structures in the world. (Source)
The Gateway Arch commemorates St. Louis’ role in the westward expansion of the United States. Also known as the Gateway to the West, the iconic monument stands 192 m tall, and is 192 m wide at its base, making it the tallest monument in the United States. (Source)
The Philadelphia Museum of Art houses creative achievements of the Western world dating to the first century AD and those of Asia since the third millennium BC. The European catalogue dates from the Medieval era to the present, and the museum also boasts the second largest collection of arms and armor in the US. If that isn't enough, you can admire the 72 steps Rocky Balboa climbed to victory. (Source)
Named Prospect Avenue from 1887 to 1910, it wasn't until the town of Hollywood was annexed to the city of Los Angeles that the street undertook its famous moniker. In 1958, the Hollywood Walk of Fame was created to pay tribute to artists of note in the entertainment industry. (Source)