Editor chat summary: 6 October, 2021

This post summarizes the weekly editor chat meeting (agenda here) held on  Wednesday, October 6 2021, 04:00 PM GMT+1. in Slack. Moderated by @paaljoachim.

GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party releases

Gutenberg 11.7 RC Thanks to @zieladam
What’s new in Gutenberg 11.6 release notes. Thanks to @ntsekouras for writing the notes and tackling the release!

WordPress 5.9

October 14th is the date when the decision for “Go, no go” for Full Site Editing to be included in WordPress 5.9 will be decided.

Preliminary Road to 5.9. A quick overview of the main areas and features currently underway for 5.9 in Gutenberg.

What’s next in Gutenberg

What’s next in Gutenberg: Mid-September 2021.

Key project updates

Based on the scope for Site Editing projects.

Template Editor

  • No update currently mentioned. Check out the Full Site Editing label of current issues in the Gutenberg repo on GithubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/.

Global Styling

Patterns

Navigation BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. & Navigation Editor

Update – 2021-10-06

  • Discussion is still continuing on the best way to ensure interoperability and compatibility between Nav block and Nav Editor.
  • Looks like there will be a Hallway Hangout on Wednesday 13th October (TBC). Agenda will be posted to Make Blogblog (versus network, site).
  • @talldan posted a nice summary of current state of things in Slack. There’s a lot of great energy in the team right now and we are looking to coalesce around a shared set of objectives.

Components squad

Shipping:

In Progress:

Mobile team

 Shipped:

  • Top 5 embeds blocks directly available in the block picker, Retry feature, specific embed’s icon and label in placeholder and bottom sheets.
  • Added a way to contact support from inside editor.
  • Added automated tests for editor onboarding.

Fixes:

  • Fixed an image block regressionregression A software bug that breaks or degrades something that previously worked. Regressions are often treated as critical bugs or blockers. Recent regressions may be given higher priorities. A "3.6 regression" would be a bug in 3.6 that worked as intended in 3.5. causing the images to render with a fixed height and a bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. preventing the columns block from rendering in the editor in some occasions.

In Progress:

  • Embed block improvements.
  • GSS Font size, line height, colors.

Task Coordination

@annezazu

@ntsekouras

@amustaque97

Worked on Update Callers to handle when getBlockType return undefined (PR has been merged.)

@mamaduka

  • Helping with PR reviews and testing.
  • Merged the last PR for optimizing useSelect calls.
  • Started working on remaining items in the individual block locking feature.

Open Floor

@welcher

@mkaz

  • Any issues with switching Gutenberg examples repo (https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg-examples) default branch to trunk? It’ll be nice to have it consistent.

@bph

  • This week’s Live Q & A is tomorrow at 16:00 UTC Going from classic to block-based theme building
  • Next week, Helen, Mark and Riad discuss how to make it easier to build custom blocks
  • On 10/28 LQA is with members of the BuddyPress Team discussion how to convert widgets to blocks.

Times and links are all available on Gutenbergtimes.com

@paaljoachim

  • Can someone create a WP 5.9 Github project board to where we can focus on Full Site Editing and general 5.9 issues/PR’s? As it has earlier been very useful to have the project board to check for issues related to a release.

    @priethor
    I can kick it off, sure. I was looking forward to the go/no-go demo next week so that we can have a more clear scope of the must-haves before creating it.

@talldanwp

  • The following PR needs some discussion: Use theme mods for templates and template parts
    “I was referred to this PR, and it seems like it had a lot of traction in 5.8 but didn’t make it in time. It’s still there needing reviews and possibly a decision for 5.9 and it seems like something that shouldn’t be left too late, otherwise the same will happen again.
    (I would review it myself, but I don’t really have the full knowledge required).”

    @get_dave
    It would be great if there was a recap summary which captures the current state of discussion. It seems pretty important for the utility of Template Parts. (Dave added a comment.)

@Gemini Labs

  • In Gutenberg 11.6 the ServerSideRender component was updated to display the existing content while the new response is fetched. There is bug with this change which I outlined here: https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg/pull/28297#issuecomment-932723947. I thought it might be useful to bring it up again here in light of the recent Gutenberg 11.7 RC release (thanks @zieladam!).
    Bug issue opened here: Bug in ServerSideRender where the block disappears during render.
  • I would like to ask if anyone here had any concerns about adding a hook (or some other solution) to ServerSideRender which allows a plugin author to trigger something after a block has rendered.
    I opened a Feature Requestfeature request A feature request should generally begin the process in the ideas forum, on a mailing list, as a plugin, or brought to the attention of the core team, such as through scope meetings held for each major release. Unsolicited tickets of this variety are typically, therefore, discouraged. for this on Github here with a further explanation: https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg/issues/35294

@get_dave

  • I found this forum post asking if there is a separate Read More block for use in a Query LoopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop.? Currently it seems the Read more is locked inside the ExcerptExcerpt An excerpt is the description of the blog post or page that will by default show on the blog archive page, in search results (SERPs), and on social media. With an SEO plugin, the excerpt may also be in that plugin’s metabox.. There is also a Gutenberg issue for it here: Could we have Read more link as a stand alone block?

@amustaque97

@zebulan

#core-editor, #core-editor-summary, #gutenberg, #meeting-notes, #summary

Proposal: Gutenberg Developer Hours series of events.

  • Summary: Proposal for a new event: Every other week, invite WordPress developers to meet with 3 developers and discuss your GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ development questions, code, ideas, and approaches. Follow-up w/ video and resources.
  • Start Date: Soon.
  • Trial period: 4 events.
  • Producer: Birgit Pauli-Haack + Gutenberg Developer Volunteers. 

Background: 

I used to do in-person walk-in clinics for a volunteer internet service provider, where we answered all kinds of questions. If there was a moment with no questions, I would pull a topic out of my hat, talk for five minutes and get another 10 questions that triggered in people’s heads. The place was always packed. Not everyone is comfortable dealing with an unknown set of questions, but when done right, it’s quite fun and interesting. Of course, there were always questions that were too specific or too advanced. We would take note of it and answer them either the following week or via email directly to the attendee. 

I would like to try this in a remote setting with a panel of three developers from the community, who are experienced with working with blocks, and call it Gutenberg Developer Hours. 

Details on Gutenberg Developer Hours

I have heard from many in the community that although there is developer documentation available, it’s hard to get started. When developers hit roadblocks, it also takes a long time to troubleshoot errors and bugs. 

This is an offering to developers new to Gutenberg, to get questions answered or obtain advice on architecture or approach. Having a panel helps with the broad set of topics, distributes the load and takes away the fear of being confronted alone with a question, one might not be able to answer. 

Attendees could bring code issues and talk about those, “I’ve been working on this project, but I hit a roadblock and I have no idea where to go from here.”

As a moderator, I can jump in and ask questions to bridge the silence if we, attendees and panelists, run out of audience questions.

Furthermore, if a question gets too specific or too advanced, the moderator makes a note of it, discusses with the dev team and gets back to the attendee with a response after the event. That could be:

  • an invitation to office hours, 
  • a set of documentation, or 
  • a blogblog (versus network, site) post inspired by the question. 

It’s certainly part of the trial to find out where the boundaries of this support offerings are. 

At the beginning, I envision a frequency of every other week, once there is a pool of volunteer developer panelists available to schedule.

To get attendees interested, it might help to have a short educational segment that people are interested in for the first two or three shows.

The panelists could also pick a topic like:

  • How to tap into Gutenberg filters and hooksHooks In WordPress theme and development, hooks are functions that can be applied to an action or a Filter in WordPress. Actions are functions performed when a certain event occurs in WordPress. Filters allow you to modify certain functions. Arguments used to hook both filters and actions look the same.?
  • How to add a button to the toolbar?
  • What is a store in ReactJS? 
  • How to add BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Styles?

For promotion, social channels like Twitter and Facebook and make.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ will be used.

Each show will be recorded and transcribed. The moderator will communicate the recording part with the attendees and If an attendee rather wants to ask their question outside the recording, the moderator can hit the pause button. 

In post-production, the recording can be cut into smaller educational units and publish it publicly on WordPress.tv. The producers can pull specific questions that stumped the panel and write a separate tutorial about it. The show is not a ‘webinar’ but a normal Zoom meeting, so people can see each other and share their screens and code.

At least for the trial, registration is required. The producers will, of course, respect the attendee’s privacy and use email addresses only for communication regarding the specific Gutenberg Developer Hour session.

I already approached a few developers to be our resident experts with the idea, they committed to want to try it. Depending on the feedback, this initiative can be started fairly soon. If you are a Gutenberg developer with some experience and would like to be part of this initiative, please let me know in the comments.

Administrative tasks:

  • Schedule the Gutenberg Developer Hours, one at a time. 
    • Set-up Zoom space, with registration.
    • Announce the next session via social channels, Make/Project, Gutenberg Times, and other available channels. 
  • Connect with the volunteers on a regular basis so they can schedule themselves. 
  • Recruit volunteers as panelists, moderators and content producers. 
  • Published post with resources and solutions.

If you want to be part of the team working on this initiative, let us know in the comments. I will connect with you via WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.. Your comments and suggestions are appreciated.

Please don’t hesitate to connect with me on WP Slack @bph if you have additional questions.


Thank You to @annezazu, @daisyo, and @sparklingrobots for collaboration and refinement of the initiative.
Props @jeffpaul and @audrasjb for peer review.

#gutenberg, #new-contributors

Dev chat summary – October 6, 2021

@audrasjb led the chat on this agenda. You can also read the Slack logs.

Highlighted blogblog (versus network, site) posts

Bringing to your attention some interesting reads and some call for feedback and/or volunteers:

Worth mentioning:

Thanks to the 21 contributors of the past week, including 4 new contributors! Kudos to the 3 coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. committers of the week, too.

A Week in Core – September 27, 2021

Upcoming releases updates

Next minor releaseMinor Release A set of releases or versions having the same minor version number may be collectively referred to as .x , for example version 5.2.x to refer to versions 5.2, 5.2.1, 5.2.3, and all other versions in the 5.2 (five dot two) branch of that software. Minor Releases often make improvements to existing features and functionality.(s)

Please note that 5.8.2 was deferred due to the lack of ready-to-ship tickets.

Reminder: @desrosj and @circlecube are co-leading the 5.8.x releases. The 5.8.x point releases are coordinated in the #5-8-release-leads SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel. This channel is public and will be archived once 5.9 is released.

Next major releasemajor release A release, identified by the first two numbers (3.6), which is the focus of a full release cycle and feature development. WordPress uses decimaling count for major release versions, so 2.8, 2.9, 3.0, and 3.1 are sequential and comparable in scope.

Concerning the next major release —WordPress 5.9— a planning roundup was published some weeks ago.

@kjellr introduced the new bundled theme on Make/Core right before the devchat.

As usual, there is a public repository on GitHub so feel free to help testing the theme, and to contribute to this cool project

@chanthaboune wanted to clarify that the go/no go date was moved to October 14. It’s just for scheduling conflicts, there is not any worry over the release.

@audrasjb will run another bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. scrub on Thursday October 7, 2021 at 20:00 UTC.

Reminder: everyone is welcome to run a bug scrub on the #core Slack channel. If you are interested, please read this handbook post: Leading bug scrubs and get in touch with @audrasjb or @francina for details.

Component maintainers updates

Build/Test Tools – @sergeybiryukov

Last week, PHPUnit tests started failing on PHPPHP The web scripting language in which WordPress is primarily architected. WordPress requires PHP 5.6.20 or higher 5.6 due to a combination of an older OpenSSL version and the DST Root CA X3 certificate that expired on September 30, 2021. This is now resolved by running the tests on the latest patchpatch A special text file that describes changes to code, by identifying the files and lines which are added, removed, and altered. It may also be referred to as a diff. A patch can be applied to a codebase for testing. version of PHP 5.6 (5.6.40 at the moment), instead of 5.6.20. See ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. #54223 for more details.

HTTPHTTP HTTP is an acronym for Hyper Text Transfer Protocol. HTTP is the underlying protocol used by the World Wide Web and this protocol defines how messages are formatted and transmitted, and what actions Web servers and browsers should take in response to various commands. APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways.@sergeybiryukov

The expired DST Root CA X3 certificate is now removed from the WP core certificate bundle to resolve issues with OpenSSL 1.0.2. See ticket #54207 for more details.

CustomizerCustomizer Tool built into WordPress core that hooks into most modern themes. You can use it to preview and modify many of your site’s appearance settings.@dlh

The Customize component could use a designer’s eye on #54211.

Upgrade/Install – @afragen

There have been issues with pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party installation/upgrade failures in plugins that have a large number of files. See #51857 (see comment 128 and below) and #54166.

@afragen thinks he have a solution in this pull request and would love some more testing and hopefully an early commit if appropriate.

Also, there are 2 different PRs for #22316 that take different approaches: PR1547 and PR1724.

It would be great to get feedback on which approach is preferred and work on getting that committed. Please test both and leave feedback.

@audrasjb noted that both PRs have detailed testing instructions. They are easy to test and any feedback is welcome.

@josvelasko raised a PR ready for review: PR#1688

Help/About – @marybaum

The Help/About component maintainers will hold a bug scrub on Monday, probably after 21:00. @marybaum will post an exact time in the next 24 hours.

Toolbar – @sabernhardt

@sabernhardt shared a draft of a Toolbar component update post.

He also pointed out that a docs update (#54191) was just committed today.

Script Loader – @clorith

The three tickets marked early about jQuery updates (37110, #51812, #52163) are almost ready to ship, so there are RC’s in for testing at least.

Open Floor

@annezazu wanted to encourage everyone to attend the Pattern Party call for testing for the #fse-outreach-experiment. All are welcome to join in and she is always open to feedback to make participating even easier.

#5-8-x, #5-9, #dev-chat, #summary, #twenty-twenty-two

CSS Chat Summary: 30 September 2021

The meeting took place here on Slack. @danfarrow facilitated and wrote up these notes.

Housekeeping

CSS Custom Properties (#49930)

  • @dryanpress suggested that, once all the PRs are merged, it would be very helpful to add a Table of Contents (TOC) to custom-properties.css. @ryelle agreed that it would help with reducing duplicates and with documentation.
  • @danfarrow asked about how the TOC sections would be broken down and @dryanpress suggested starting with a Theme and a General section, then adding sections for each file
  • We discussed following up on unfinished PRs. @dryanpress offered to gently nudge the relevant authors after which we would give them 5 days to respond before picking up / taking over their PRs. @wazeter agreed that applying a soft deadline is a good idea. UPDATE: By the end of the meeting all authors had effectively been nudged!
  • @danfarrow brought up the issue of rgba colour values and asked what the currently preferred approach is. After an interesting discussion the consensus was that the custom properties should be added for each distinct rgba value, for example --wp-admin--surface--box-shadow: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.1);. We could then work on a second pass to reduce the number of distinct rgba values.
  • @joyously imagined a script that sequentially sets each custom property to hotpink, so the user can verify that the visual changes meet expections. UPDATE: Within a few hours @costdev pretty much delivered the goods – amazing!

Open Floor / CSS Link Share

  • @dryanpress shared a link to a tweet announcing that the ouline ring now automatically adapts to the element border-radius “in the latest releases of all major browsers”
  • @ryelle shared a link to WordCamp US [Now over, but there’s always next year!]
  • @dryanpress shared a link to Omatsuri, an essential collection of very useful browser-based HTMLHTML HyperText Markup Language. The semantic scripting language primarily used for outputting content in web browsers., CSS, SVG & other web related tools

Thanks everybody!

#summary

Introducing Twenty Twenty-Two

A collection of screenshots featuring the Twenty Twenty-Two theme

WordPress 5.9 will feature a brand new default theme named Twenty Twenty-Two. It arrives during an exciting time for WordPress themes. With the advent of Full Site Editing and Global Styles, themes are changing structurally and functionally to enable far more avenues for customization than users have come to expect in the past. To take advantage of these new abilities, Twenty Twenty-Two has been designed to be the most flexible default theme ever created for WordPress.  

A reliable starting point

To find inspiration for this theme’s design, I did not have to look far. Thanks to a bird feeder attached to the outside of our kitchen window, my family’s daily breakfast routine involves a rotating cast of cardinals, doves, finches, jays, and tufted titmice. The birds are always up to something interesting: Sometimes they’re lining up patiently to take turns eating, other times they’re playfully performing aerial gymnastics. 

While the birds’ exact behavior is unpredictable, they are remarkably reliable overall. The exact lineup changes somewhat, but every single morning there’s a group of birds eating breakfast with us. Throughout all of the tumult the world has seen in the past couple years, this consistent, entertaining routine has been a welcome starting point to my day. 

That routine is the inspiration for this years’ default theme. Like the birds, Twenty Twenty-Two is designed to be light and resilient, with a hint of playfulness. The theme uses the lightweight Source Serif Pro for headlines, paired with a sensible sans-serif for support. Its color palette is drawn from nature, and layout elements sit gently on the page.

Above all, the theme is designed to be reliable. Its design choices are intentionally subtle, and its foundation will be built strong. It’s our hope that this theme will suit your site through many seasons. 

Homepage and archive page mockups for the Twenty Twenty-Two theme.

Endlessly customizable

Twenty Twenty-Two will take advantage of a wide networknetwork (versus site, blog) of page templates, headers, footers, and other patterns so that users can easily make the theme their own. In another nod to the behavior of birds everywhere, these will offer a balance between fun and utility: some are irregular and unpredictable, while others are straightforward and traditional. Together, these patterns will act as a window into all of the possibilities that the theme enables.

A variety of page layouts and block pattern mockups for the Twenty Twenty-Two theme.

In addition, Twenty Twenty-Two will ship with a range of alternate color schemes so that folks can drastically change the appearance of their site. Users will also be able to change fonts, image treatments, and more on a site-wide level. These new controls open up a wide array of drastically different customizations for the theme:

Twenty Twenty-Two is designed with the acknowledgement that its default appearance is not most people’s endpoint. Everyone deserves a truly unique website, built on a solid, well-designed foundation, and Twenty Twenty-Two aims to help them achieve that.

Built for Full Site Editing

To take advantage of these new customization features, Twenty Twenty-Two will be built for Full Site Editing first. The theme aims to use as little CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. as possible: our goal is for all theme styles to be configured through theme.jsonJSON JSON, or JavaScript Object Notation, is a minimal, readable format for structuring data. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web application, as an alternative to XML. and editable through Global Styles. The theme development team will work closely with GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ contributors to build design tools in the blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. editor that enable this goal. 

As a block theme, Twenty Twenty-Two will likely require WordPress 5.9 to run. If the Twenty Twenty-Two and 5.9 release leads determine that there is need in the community for broader theme support, we will explore ways to bridge that gap.

Next steps

Kjell Reigstad (@kjellr) is leading design for Twenty Twenty-Two, and Jeff Ong (@jffng) is leading development. The two of us are looking forward to your involvement and support though the process!  If you are interested in contributing to Twenty Twenty-Two, make sure you are following this blogblog (versus network, site)

Theme development will happen on GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/. Once the theme is stable, it will be merged into CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. and its GitHub repo will be deprecated. An empty repository has been created here that you can follow if you’d like: 

https://github.com/wordpress/twentytwentytwo

Starting on Monday October 11th at 3:00 PM UTC, there will be weekly SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. meetings in #core-themes to coordinate development of the theme.

The future of default themes

The community has produced a dozen best-in-class themes together, and we’ve come to look forward to a new one arriving at the close of each year. That said, themes are in a transition period today, and it seems like this may be a reasonable time to step back and to re-evaluate the annual cadence with which we build default themes. 

Innovations like theme.json, block templates, and block patterns are making theme development far simpler, and are providing new ways for users to customize their sites. There’s reason to believe that the community can leverage all this to build more frequent and diverse theme and customization solutions for our users in the coming years. 

We’re all still navigating these new opportunities (and in the meantime, we have a theme to build!) so let’s regroup after the 5.9 release to discuss future paths forward for default themes. 

Learn more

For information about about previous default themes, you can read the following posts:

If you’re interested in learning more about Block Themes and Full Site Editing, here are some resources for you:

Core Editor Improvement: Continued progress on accessibility

Improving accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) requires ongoing effort and this post seeks to highlight some of the ways in which the project continues to make strides in this area. If you’re interested in helping with this work, please join the #accessibility channel in Make SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and check out how you can get involved. There’s plenty of important work to be done including testing, giving accessibility feedback, and creating PRs to address feedback. 

Ensuring accessibility from the start with the Navigation blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. [planned for 5.9]

The Navigation Block is a key milestone for the full site editing project that focuses on the experience of editing a site’s navigation menuNavigation Menu A theme feature introduced with Version 3.0. WordPress includes an easy to use mechanism for giving various control options to get users to click from one place to another on a site., both in terms of structure and design. This is a big effort that includes how to make it easy to add submenu items, how to create a responsive navigation experience, how to support multiple different inner blocks, and more. While work is underway to simplify the experience for all (ex: reducing the number of steps to add a page link), this section covers three big pieces of the work, thus far, that have had a particularly strong impact on accessibility:

  1. The first is that when implementing submenus it was intentional that they would open on explicit click rather than focus, when navigating with a keyboard and/or screen reader. The changes made ensure that screen reader users are better informed when tabbing submenus, and can choose whether to enter them or not. Previously it was necessary to tab through every submenu item to get to the next parent item. For a deeper look into the behaviors of the navigation block and submenu items, check out these visualizations that provide more context but have not yet been fully implemented. 
  1. When building the responsive navigation feature in the navigation block, work was done to ensure the hamburger menu was built using proper modal behavior from the start. This means that when you open the responsive burger menu, the tab is kept inside the responsive menu experience until you press Escape. A quick demonstration is shown in the video displayed in this section.
  1. Finally, the markup for the front end was changed to ensure that the Navigation block contains fully semantic markup, no matter what its contents are.

Accessibility benefits with the Gallery Block Refactor [planned for 5.9]

Ahead of WordPress 5.9, an update to the Gallery Block was shipped that essentially allows you to have all of the tools you’re used to with an Image Block for each image in the Gallery Block. Thanks to this change, the Gallery Block now benefits from improved keyboard navigation and the ability to add alt text right within the block sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme.. This will make it easier to both produce accessibility friendly content and for those navigating what you create when viewing your site. To learn more about the Gallery Block Refactor, you can check out this WordPress News post dedicated to it

The new gallery block with an alt text field for each image within the gallery block itself.

Other noteworthy updates/fixes [in the GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party today]

There’s a lot of high-impact changes that can be overlooked when not shown altogether. To help capture additional accessibility improvements, here are high impact changes in the editing experience: 

Thank you to @joen who helped provide wonderful insights about the navigation block, including the featured video. Thank you to @kellychoffman @priethor @daisyo for the content review. Thank you to @javiarce for the lovely Gallery Block refactor screenshot.

#core-editor-improvement, #gutenberg

Dev Chat Agenda for October 6, 2021

Here is the agenda for this week’s developer meeting to occur on October 6, 2021, at 20:00 UTC.

Please note that depending on your timezone, the time may have changed with the end of daylight saving time.

Blogblog (versus network, site) Post Highlights and announcements

Bringing to your attention some interesting reads and some call for feedback and/or volunteers:

Next releases status update

  • Next minor releaseMinor Release A set of releases or versions having the same minor version number may be collectively referred to as .x , for example version 5.2.x to refer to versions 5.2, 5.2.1, 5.2.3, and all other versions in the 5.2 (five dot two) branch of that software. Minor Releases often make improvements to existing features and functionality.: WP 5.8.2
    👉 WordPress 5.8.2 Deferred
  • Next major releasemajor release A release, identified by the first two numbers (3.6), which is the focus of a full release cycle and feature development. WordPress uses decimaling count for major release versions, so 2.8, 2.9, 3.0, and 3.1 are sequential and comparable in scope.: WP 5.9
    👉 WordPress 5.9 Planning Roundup

Components check-in and status updates

  • Check-in with each component for status updates.
  • Poll for components that need assistance.

Open Floor

Do you have something to propose for the agenda, or a specific item relevant to the usual agenda items above?

Please leave a comment, and say whether or not you’ll be in the chat, so the group can either give you the floor or bring up your topic for you accordingly.

This meeting happens in the #core channel. To join the meeting, you’ll need an account on the Making WordPress Slack.

#5-8-2, #5-9, #agenda, #core, #dev-chat

Editor Chat Agenda: 6 October 2021

Facilitator and notetaker: @paaljoachim

This is the agenda for the weekly editor chat scheduled for Wednesday, October 6 2021, 04:00 PM GMT+1.

This meeting is held in the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

  • GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ 11.7 RC will be released Wednesday.
  • What’s new in Gutenberg 11.6
  • WordPress 5.9 “Go, no go” date and priorities.
  • Whats next in Gutenberg: Mid-September 2021.
  • Updates based on updated scope for site editing projects:
    • Navigation BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. & Navigation Editor.
    • Template editor.
    • Patterns.
    • Styling.
    • Mobile Team.
  • Task Coordination.
  • Open Floor.

If you are not able to attend the meeting, you are encouraged to share anything relevant for the discussion:

  • If you have an update for the main site editing projects, please feel free to share as a comment or come prepared for the meeting itself.
  • If you have anything to share for the Task Coordination section, please leave it as a comment on this post.
  • If you have anything to propose for the agenda or other specific items related to those listed above, please leave a comment below.

#agenda, #core-editor, #core-editor-agenda, #meeting

A Week in Core – October 4, 2021

Welcome back to a new issue of Week in CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.. Let’s take a look at what changed on TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. between September 27 and October 4, 2021.

  • 11 commits
  • 21 contributors
  • 31 tickets created
  • 4 tickets reopened
  • 23 tickets closed

The Core team is currently working on the next point (5.8.2) and major (5.9) releases 🛠

Ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. numbers are based on the Trac timeline for the period above. The following is a summary of commits, organized by component and/or focus.

Code changes

Administration

  • Enable first and last page buttons in WP_List_Table::pagination()#42763

App Passwords

  • Remove placeholder from the app password name input field – #54047

Coding Standards

  • Remove duplicate assignment from a ternary operator in WP_MS_Sites_List_Table::site_states()#38296
  • Use strict comparison in wp-includes/class-http.php#53359
  • Use strict comparison in wp-includes/class-wp-http-ixr-client.php#53359

Docs

  • Improve documentation for WP_Admin_Bar methods – #54191

HTTPHTTP HTTP is an acronym for Hyper Text Transfer Protocol. HTTP is the underlying protocol used by the World Wide Web and this protocol defines how messages are formatted and transmitted, and what actions Web servers and browsers should take in response to various commands. APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways.

  • Remove the DST Root CA X3 certificate expired on September 30, 2021 – #54207, #50828

REST APIREST API The REST API is an acronym for the RESTful Application Program Interface (API) that uses HTTP requests to GET, PUT, POST and DELETE data. It is how the front end of an application (think “phone app” or “website”) can communicate with the data store (think “database” or “file system”) https://developer.wordpress.org/rest-api/.

  • Sort widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. types by their id – #53303

Bundled Themes

  • Twenty Twenty-One: Keep the closing </span> tagtag A directory in Subversion. WordPress uses tags to store a single snapshot of a version (3.6, 3.6.1, etc.), the common convention of tags in version control systems. (Not to be confused with post tags.) in footer links – #54209
  • Twenty Twenty-One: Remove duplicate class name from localized font-family elements – #54196
  • Twenty Twenty: Remove duplicate class name from localized font-family elements – #54196

Props

Thanks to the 21 people who contributed to WordPress Core on Trac last week: @audrasjb (4), @sabernhardt (3), @hellofromTonya (2), @mukesh27 (2), @aezazshekh (2), @tmatsuur (2), @rehanali (2), @joelcj91 (1), @SergeyBiryukov (1), @yagniksangani (1), @joedolson (1), @bradleyt (1), @seedsca (1), @fierevere (1), @Pillai (1), @Hareesh (1), @knutsp (1), @ronakganatra (1), @wp_kc (1), @spacedmonkey (1), and @desrosj (1).

Congrats and welcome to our 4 new contributors of the week: @rehanali, @yagniksangani, @Pillai, and @wp_kc ♥️

Core committers: @sergeybiryukov (8), @hellofromtonya (2), and @timothyblynjacobs (1).

#5-8-2, #5-9, #core, #week-in-core