background image

Carbon Footprint Across the Coffee Supply Chain:

The Case of Costa Rican Coffee

Track: 

Supply-Chain and Operation Management

Key words

: Carbon footprint, coffee supply chain, Costa Rica.

November 2012

background image

Carbon Footprint Across the Coffee Supply Chain:

The Case of Costa Rican Coffee

Abstract

The issue of carbon emissions has been on the corporate  sustainability agenda for some years. For those working in  
agricultural  supply chains the challenges  remain significant,  given the diverse direct  and indirect  emissions  occurring 
throughout the value chain. This study determines the carbon footprint of the supply chain of Costa Rican coffee exported to 
Europe, using best practice methodology to calculate greenhouse gas emissions. Overall it was found that the total carbon  
footprint across the entire supply chain is 4.98 kg CO

2e

/kg green coffee. The carbon footprint of the processes in Costa Rica 

to produce 1 kilogram of green coffee is 1.93 kg CO

2e

. The processes within Europe generate 3.05 CO

2e

/kg green coffee. 

This carbon footprint is considered as “very high intensity”. This paper also identifies the sources of the most intense 
emission and discusses mitigation possibilities on which efforts must be focused. 

Key words

: Carbon footprint, coffee supply chain, Costa Rica.

1

Introduction

Climate change  is a known and largely accepted  reality,  and the world’s climate will continue to change  as long as  
greenhouse gas levels keep rising (UNFCCC, 2002). The effects of climate change are clearly perceivable, and impacts are  
being felt worldwide. This is especially so for communities dependent on climate for their livelihoods – namely farmers. 
Human   activity  in   industry   and   agriculture   has   much   responsibility   in   this   regard;   agriculture   directly   contributes   to 
approximately  10% - 12% of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, according to the latest IPCC report (Smith and 
Martino, 2007). 

The growing public concern about climate change has given rise to responses from government and industry. The corporate 
world has responded by starting to evaluate the global warming potential of their products. For those working in agricultural 
supply chains the challenges remain significant, given the diverse direct and indirect emissions occurring throughout the  
value chain. 

In terms of GHG emissions, agriculture is a complex process that results in many direct non-carbon dioxide emissions in 
addition to direct carbon dioxide and indirect GHG emissions (DEFRA, 2011).  This complexity is particularly significant 
in coffee supply chains, since coffee beans change hands dozens of times on the journey from producers to consumer 
(Fairtrade, 2012). 

Over the last 20 years, with growing demand, there has been a move to greater intensification of coffee growing and heavy 
use of agrochemicals (Consumers International, 2005), which led to an increase in environmental impacts at farm level. In  
the next stage of the coffee supply chain; a common practice for processing coffee is the wet milling process. Coffee  
produced through this method is regarded as being of better quality (Consumers International, 2005), but inherent in this  
method lays the significant challenge of properly managing the resulting effluent. 

‘Carbon Footprint’ has become a widely used term and concept to define responsibility and abatement action against the  
threat of global climate change (Wiedmann and Minx, 2008). A carbon footprint is obtained by quantifying GHG emissions 
produced during a defined period of time, which is then expressed in carbon dioxide equivalent.

To date, there is little information in scientific literature about carbon emissions in the coffee sector. Given this lack of 
information, this study is an attempt to understand coffee’s carbon footprint and to identify a response that helps to reduce 
impacts over time.

background image

The main purpose of this study has been to determine the carbon footprint of a Costa Rican coffee supply chain using best  
practice methodology to calculate greenhouse gas emissions. Its purpose was also to develop a tool to calculate GHG 
emissions in the coffee supply chain, to enable replication in other coffee supply chains as necessary. Additionally, the  
study sought to identify ‘hot spots’ of GHG emissions in the coffee supply chain, in order to determine where mitigation 
efforts should be focused, and to evaluate alternatives of mitigation efforts and their impact on the carbon footprint.

To meet these objectives, the study focused on different stages of the coffee supply chain: at farm level, in the central mill, 
and during the process of exportation. In order to assess the carbon footprint of the entire coffee supply chain, results of  
processes undertaken outside Costa Rica and within Europe were drawn from an existing study that evaluates the carbon 
footprint of coffee exported to Germany (PCF Pilotprojekt Deutschland, 2008). 

Finally,  it is worth noting that sustainability measures and carbon reductions are still largely optional practices within 
supply   chains.   However,   as   consumers,   NGOs   and   governments   increasingly   demand   more   of   it,   companies   and 
stakeholders involved in the coffee business will have to meet these expectations through greater efforts on sustainability  
practices and through lower carbon emissions. The adaptability of the results of the present study and the calculation tool 
developed will be extremely valuable in evaluating carbon footprint in other regions.

2

Literature Review

The current section synthesizes published information related to carbon footprints. It summarizes public knowledge on 
greenhouse gas emissions, the impact of coffee in terms of carbon emissions, the definition of carbon footprint and carbon 
footprint methodologies as well as the theoretical base and understanding of the topic. 

Greenhouse Gas Emissions 

The effects of climate change are clearly perceivable and accelerating. Whereas all of these changes cannot be attributed to 
human activities only, it has to be acknowledged that the accelerated concentration of carbon dioxide (CO

2

) particles in the 

atmosphere   –  which   reached   389  ppm   in   September   2011  (ESRL,   2012a)   –  and   the   implications   of   altering   natural 
lifecycles, have not occurred randomly. 

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) acknowledges in its definition of climate 
change that the change of climate is attributed directly and indirectly to human activity, which alters the composition of the  
global atmosphere (UNFCCC, 1992).  Levels of all key greenhouse gases are rising as a direct result of human activities 
(UNFCCC, 2002).

Of the greenhouse gases, CO

2

  is of greatest concern because it contributes the most to enhanced greenhouse effect and 

climate change (ESRL, 2012b). Currently, carbon dioxide is responsible for over 60% of the enhanced greenhouse effect,  
mostly from the burning of fossil fuels (UNFCC, 2002). Deforestation is the second largest source of carbon dioxide, when 
forests are cleared for agriculture or development. The production of lime to make cement accounts for 3% of CO

2

 emission 

from industrial sources (IPCC, 2005). 

Methane is the second most abundant GHG after carbon dioxide (Global Methane Initiative, 2010). Domesticated animals 
(cattle) emit methane, which is produced by enteric fermentation of food by bacteria and other microbes in the animals’ 
digestive  tracts. The decomposition of manure also releases  methane. Other  sources  of methane include wetland rice  
farming by the decomposition of organic matter in the flooded soil, disposal and treatment of garbage and human wastes by  
anaerobic decomposition (UNFCCC, 2002).

Nitrous oxide is an important anthropogenic GHG and agriculture represents its largest source (Reay 

et al.

, 2012). Part of 

that nitrous oxide is produced by the use of fertilizers and manures. The nitrogen contained in those products enhances the  
natural process of nitrification and denitrification. Bacteria and other microbes in the soil carry out this process to convert 
part of the nitrogen into nitrous oxide (Willey and Chameides, 2007). 

background image

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs) 
and sulfur hexafluoride (SF

6

) are long-lived and potent greenhouse gases; very small emissions of these gases relative to 

CO2 can have a large climate impact (Field and Raupach, 2004).

Agriculture directly contributes to approximately 10% - 12% of global greenhouse gas emissions, according to the latest 
IPCC report (Smith and Martino, 2007). Agricultural practices generate the greenhouses gases from carbon dioxide (CO

2

linked to land conversion, soil management and energy use, nitrous oxide (N

2

O) connected to the use of fertilizers, and 

methane (CH

4

) which is mainly related to waste management of the product (Flessa 

et al

, 2002). Globally, agricultural 

methane (CH

4

) and nitrous oxide (N

2

O) emissions increased by nearly 17% from 1990 to 2005 (Smith and Martino, 2007).  

According to the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Costa Rica emitted about 2000 thousand metric  
tones of carbon during 2010 and an average of 0.5 metric tones of carbon per capita (CDIAC, 2012). Greenhouse gas 
emissions from agriculture represent approximately 39% of the Costa Rican emissions, according to the national inventory 
of GHG emissions carried out in 2005 (Chacón, Montenegro, and Sasa, 2009). 

Impact of Coffee in terms of Carbon Emissions

Coffee is the world’s most widely traded tropical agricultural commodity (ICO, 2011). In the world economy, the coffee 
trade was worth approximately US$ 16.5 billion by 2010 (ITC, 2011). It is a major source of revenue for more than 40 
tropical countries, and it generates more than 120 million jobs (CIRAD, 2012). Around 125 million people worldwide  
depend on coffee for their livelihoods (Fairtrade, 2012) and people are involved in the sector from farm level through to  
processing and sale (Consumers International, 2005).  

According to CIRAD (2012), coffee is grown on more than 10 million hectares worldwide. The world production for 
2011/2012 was estimated at 131.4 million bags (ICO, 2012a), and the USDA (2012) has forecasted a record 148 millions 
bags of coffee worldwide for the 2012/2013 harvest. 

Coffee is particularly important to the Costa Rican export portfolio. In 2010 dry green coffee

1

 exports were ranked 9th in 

terms of importance and represented 12.1% of the total value of agricultural exports and 2.8% of the total exportation of the 
country   (PROCOMER,   2011).   During   the   coffee   harvest   season   2010/2011,   Costa   Rica   was   the   14th   largest   coffee 
producing   country,   producing   1.19%   of   the   worldwide   coffee   production,   according   to   the   International   Coffee 
Organization (ICO, 2012b).

As a result of production on such a large scale, the coffee supply chain is an important contributor to global GHG emissions 
(Naponen 

et al

., 2012).

A study carried out in Costa Rica and Nicaragua during 2011 at farm level (which evaluated greenhouse gas emissions in 
coffee grown with differing input levels under conventional and organic management) found that the carbon footprint for 1 
kg of fresh coffee cherries were between 0.26 and 0.67 kg CO

2e

 for conventional and 0.12 and 0.52 kg CO

2e

 for organic 

management systems. According to this study, it can be deduced that main contributors to GHG emissions were the inputs 
of organic and inorganic nitrogen (Naponen 

et al

., 2012).

In terms of footprint throughout the whole coffee value chain from bean to cup, the full carbon footprint including these  
various different processes reaches 59.12 g CO

2e

 per cup of coffee (PCF Pilotprojekt Deutschland, 2008).

Defining Carbon Footprint

The growing public concern about climate change has aroused the interest of industries to evaluate the global warming 
impact of their products across their supply chain. According to Brenton, Edwards and Friis (2009) carbon accounting in 
today’s globalised world is becoming complex and difficult, because  value chains are growing longer and even more 
complex. In agricultural commodities like coffee (the unit of analysis for this study) the value chain starts from cultivation 
and end at the disposal after consumption (Sevenste and Vehagen, 2010). 

1

 Green coffee is the coffee in the naked bean before roasting. 

background image

The carbon footprint is recognized as a valuable indicator of GHG emissions (Turner  

et al

., 2012). The United States 

Environmental Protection Agency points out that a carbon footprint represents the total amount of greenhouse gases that are  
emitted into the atmosphere each year by a person, family or company (EPA, 2012). DEFRA (2011) suggests that the 
carbon footprint should be used as a tool to identify main sources of emissions for all types of goods and services. 

Wiedmann and Minx (2008) proposed a definition of carbon footprint exclusively related to the total amount of carbon  
dioxide emissions that is directly and indirectly caused by an activity or product. Wright, Kemp and Williams (2011) 
suggest that as data collection for CO

2

 and CH

4

 emissions is relatively straightforward, these two carbon-based gases should 

be used in the determination of carbon footprint. They propose the term ‘climate footprint’ for the inclusion of other GHG 
(non carbon-based gases) for full life cycle assessments.

For the purpose of this study, the concept of carbon footprint includes the emissions of GHG involved in the assessed 
activity. Taking into account that no greenhouse gas affects the atmosphere to the same extent, that each GHG has different  
global warming potential, and that each GHG is normalized against CO

2

 using a global warming factor, the carbon footprint 

is therefore expressed as CO

2

 equivalent (CO2e)(PCA, 2011).

Carbon Footprint Methodologies 

In  recent   years,   voluntary  initiatives to  mitigate   climate  change  and  overall  sustainability have  increased.   Worldwide 
standards and methodological frameworks have been developed in the context of carbon footprint. These standards aim to 
identify, measure, reduce, mitigate and even neutralize the emissions of products, events, companies or territories. Both  
private stakeholders and public-private partnerships have been implemented and are working on these initiatives (ITC, 
2012).

The European Union is leading this field. More specifically, the United Kingdom and France are the world leaders in the 
development of strategies and tools for the determination and assessment of the carbon footprint (CEPAL, 2010). 

The British government, through its Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) and the Carbon Trust, 
teamed up with the British Standard Institute (BSI) to create a methodology for calculating GHG emissions embedded in  
goods and services by developing a Publicly Available Standard 2050 (PAS 2050), it was one of first public product carbon  
methodologies to be published (DEFRA, 2008).

The   French   Agency   for   Environment   and   Energy   Management   (ADEME)   created   Bilan   Carbone,   a   GHG   emission 
assessment tool. It is widely used in France and has influence in neighboring countries. The main aim of Bilan Carbone is to 
audit and set the GHG emissions according to weight, within a given scope of study, so that practical conclusions and areas  
of improvement can be put forward (ADEME, 2009)

In 2008 Germany created the Project Carbon Footprint of Products (PCF Projekt), a practical tool for the estimation of the 
climate impact of individual products and processes (Priess, 2011). 

International   standards   of   carbon   accounting   include   the   Greenhouse   Gas   Protocol,   which   is   an   accounting   tool   to 
understand, quantify, and manage greenhouse gas emissions (GHG Protocol, 2012). Finally, ISO 14067, a carbon footprint  
standard for products, is currently under development by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO, 2012); it 
is considered a fully international-based standard for the quantification and communication of GHG emissions of products 
and services (ITC, 2012).

3

Methodology

Coffee goes through several stages on its journey from the grower to consumer; multiple sites and multiple companies are 
involved in this supply chain, which makes it complex. Traceability is difficult; data in the different process is in many 
cases not available, especially at farm level.  This study extends its analysis to the whole coffee supply chain, emphasizing  
the collection of high quality data of its life cycle, and backtracking to their origin.

background image

The methodology is structured in three sections: scope of the study, carbon footprint calculation tool and the process of data  
collection (farm level, central mill, exportation, and processes within Europe).

3.1

Scope of the Study

This study was conducted in Costa Rica and evaluates the different  processes involved in the  supply chain of coffee 
exported to Europe. The information used is drawn from the 2009/2010 coffee production period. 

The study covers three different stages of the coffee supply chain in Costa Rica: Farm level, milling and the process of 
exportation (Figure 1). 

Figure 1.

 Stages of the coffee supply chain evaluated.

In order to take a broader view of carbon emissions across the coffee value chain, other stages such as final processing  
(roasting), distribution and preparation related to the final country destination were integrated but not directly counted;  
information at these stages was taken from a previous coffee carbon footprint study (Figure 2). 

Figure 2.

 Stages of the coffee supply chain within Europe.

The scope for this study was defined using PAS 2050:2011 a carbon standard development by the British Department for 
Environmental Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) and the British Standards Institution (BSI) (DEFRA and BSI, 2011).

The main scopes defined for the stages directly evaluated are presented in Figure 3.

 

Figure 3.

 Scopes defined for the stages of the coffee supply chain carried out in Costa Rica.

Defining the functional unit

According to PAS 2050 the functional unit defines the function of the product that is being assessed and the quantity of  
product to which all of the data collected will relate, so the carbon footprint must be defined in terms of a functional unit  
(DEFRA and BSI, 2011). 

background image

The functional unit defined for this study was one kilogram of green coffee. Therefore, the results of the carbon footprint 
are presented as kilograms of carbon dioxide (CO

2e

) per one kilogram of green coffee (kg CO

2e

/kg green coffee).

Exclusion of process from the analyzed system 

In order to simplify the process PAS 2050 allows the exclusion of some elements of the carbon footprint. At least 95% of  
the total emissions have to be assessed, but materials that contribute less than 1% of the footprint can be excluded. 

When land use change occurred more than 20 years prior to assessment, no land use change emissions should be included 
(DEFRA, 2011).  The land under coffee production in Costa Rica during 1990 to 2002 has been maintained at a constant  
level, registering reduction of the production area by 2008 (GFA, 2010).  Because the land destined to produce coffee has  
been in agricultural production for more than 20 years, no emissions from land-use change have been included. Carbon 
storage from shade trees and perennial crop are also excluded from the PAS 2050 method.

Other things not included are: human energy inputs to process and preprocess, transport of employees to and from their 
normal place of work.

3.2

The Carbon Footprint Calculation Tool

Before collecting primary data from the field, a methodology was developed to quantify the GHG emissions. As guidance,  
PAS   2050:2011   (DEFRA   and   BSI,   2011)   were   used,   as   well   as   the   IPCC   guidelines   for   National   Greenhouse   Gas 
Inventories (IPCC, 2006).

Conversion factors  provided by the IPCC  and DEFRA were used to determine the footprint of each emission factor.  
Because of variation in factors caused by the sources of inputs (e.g. electricity) from country to country, specific Costa 
Rican conversion factors on electricity and fossil fuels were used from the National Climate Change Strategy (NCCS) 
(Ruiz and Musmanni, 2007).

To measure the carbon footprint, an Excel calculation tool was created, into which all data and emission factors were  
inputted. The model is structured in three different steps, as is explained in the following section (Figure 4). 

 

Figure 4.

 Steps followed to calculate coffee carbon footprint.

Step 1: Coffee production:

First, the amount of coffee produced or processed at every stage was determined, in order to have a reference for which the  
emissions of each stage can be divided to obtain the carbon footprint of a specific source of emission. The information on 
coffee is presented as green coffee.

Step 2: Calculating carbon emissions: 

To calculate the emissions of each source, every activity data (e.g. amount of fossil fuels) is multiplied by its specific 
emission factor, as explained in equation 1 (DEFRA and BSI, 2011).

(Equation 1)

CO

2

 emissions = source of emission or activity data * emission factor

Equation   1   was   used   mostly   to   calculate   the   emissions   caused   by   the   consumption   of   fossil   fuels,   electricity,   aerial 
transportation for marketing purposes, oversea transportation, and administrative activities.

background image

Different conversion sources were used to calculate the emissions, as follows: Fossil fuel emissions and the electricity were 
calculated using the national average fossil fuels and energy emission factors for Costa Rica, provided by ENCC (Ruiz and  
Musmmani,   2007;   and   IMN,   2011).   The   emission   factors   from   the   use   of   goods   and   services   by   the   administrative  
department in Costa Rica, aerial transportation, the overseas transportation, and the land transport in Europe from port to 
warehouse were obtained from DEFRA. 

Carbon emissions from the use of fertilizers, the decomposition of organic matter in wastewater and from burning biomass 
were calculated with the following specific equations.

Emissions from fertilizers

Agrochemicals encompass the production of chemicals, transportation, and direct and indirect N

2

O emissions from soil for 

the application of fertilizers. The emission factors for producing fertilizers and pesticides were obtained from DEFRA 
(DEFRA, 2012). The N

2

O emissions were estimated using equations introduced by IPCC guidelines (IPCC, 2006b).

Equation 2 was used to calculate the direct emissions by the application of nitrogen from synthetic fertilizers.

(Equation 2)

CO

2e 

=  (F

SN

*FE

1

)*(44/28)*(GWP N

2

O/1000)

CO

2e 

= equivalent CO

emissions

F

SN 

= annual amount of synthetic fertilizer N applied to soils, kg N yr

-1

FE

1

 = emission factor for N

2

O emissions from N inputs, kg N

2

O–N (kg N input)

-1

 

F

SN

*FE

= annual direct N

2

O–N emissions from N inputs to managed soils, kg N

2

O–N yr

-1

44/28 = conversion of N

2

O–N emissions to N

2

O emissions

GWP N

2

O = Global Warming Potential of N

2

O, t CO

2e

The   indirect  emissions,  by  the  application  of   nitrogen   from  synthetic  fertilizers,   were   calculated  using  equation  3  to 
calculate volatilization of N2O, and equation 4 to calculate the leaching of N2O.

(Equation 3) volatilization

CO

2e 

= ((F

SN

*Frac

GASF

)*EF

4

)*(44/28)*(GWP N

2

O/1000)

CO

2e 

= equivalent CO

emissions

F

SN 

= annual amount of synthetic fertilizer N applied to soils, kg N yr

-1

Frac

GASF 

=  fraction of synthetic fertilizer N that volatilizes as NH

3

 and NO

x

, kg N volatilized (kg of N

applied

)

-1

FE

4

 = emission factor for N

2

O emissions from atmospheric deposition of N on soils and water surfaces, [kg N–N

2

O (kg NH

3

 –N + NO

x

–N 

volatilized)

-1

]

(F

SN

*Frac

GASF

)*EF

4

 = annual amount of N

2

O–N produced from atmospheric deposition of N volatilized from managed soils, kg N

2

O–N 

yr-1
44/28 = conversion of N

2

O–N emissions to N

2

O emissions

GWP N

2

O = Global Warming Potential of N

2

O, t CO

2e

(Equation 4) leaching

CO

2e 

= ((F

SN

*Frac

LEACH-(H)

)*EF

5

)*(44/28)*(GWP N

2

O/1000)

CO

2e 

= equivalent CO

emissions

F

SN 

= annual amount of synthetic fertilizer N applied to soils in regions where leaching/runoff occurs, kg N yr

-1

Frac

LEACH 

= fraction of all N added to/mineralized in managed soils in regions where leaching/runoff occurs that is lost through leaching 

and runoff, kg N (kg of N additions)

-1

FE

5

 = emission factor for N

2

O emissions from N leaching and runoff, kg N

2

O–N (kg N leached and runoff)

-1

  

  ((F

SN

*Frac

LEACH-(H)

)*EF

5

) =    annual amount of N

2

O–N produced from leaching and runoff of N additions to managed soils in regions  

where leaching/runoff occurs, kg N

2

O-N yr

-1

44/28 = conversion of N

2

O–N emissions to N

2

O emissions

GWP N

2

O = Global Warming Potential of N

2

O, t CO

2e

Emissions from decomposition of organic matter in wastewater

The  emissions of methane (CH

4

) produced by the decomposition of organic matter in wastewater were estimated using 

equations obtained from the waste section of the IPCC guidelines (IPCC, 2006c). 

The emissions by the decomposition of organic matter in wastewater were calculated as follows: to obtain the amount of 
organic degradable material the equation 5 and equation 6 were used to determine the emission factor for treatment systems, 
and net methane emissions were calculated with equation 7.   Finally, CH

4

 was converted to CO

2e

 using equation 8.

background image

44 = Molecular weight of CO

2

 

16 = Molecular weight of CH

4

 

Emissions from burning biomass

The emissions caused by burning biomass, for drying coffee, were calculated with equations obtained from the energy  
section of the IPCC guidelines (IPCC, 2006a).

The biomass consumed was calculated with equation 7. From the burning of biomass different GHG are emitted, such as 
CO

2

, CH

4

 and N

2

O, the emissions of these gases are calculated with equation 8. 

To convert the emissions of CH

4

 and N

2

O to CO

2e

, the emissions of each gas were multiplied by its specific global warming 

potential, and the results were totaled to obtain the emissions expressed in CO

2e

 by burning biomass (Equation 9).

Step 3: Carbon footprint calculation

The emissions of each stage are totaled and standardized in kg of CO

2e

. These emissions are divided into the total amount of 

coffee produced or processed in each stage. The result of this division is the carbon footprint of each stage; it is expressed in 
kg CO

2e

/kg green coffee (Equation 10). 

3.3

Data Collection

With established scopes for the study and the tools with which to calculate the emissions, the primary data was obtained at 
each stage of the coffee supply chain evaluated, as described below.

3.3.1

Farm level

Costa Rican coffee production is largely concentrated in smallholder systems; about 92% of them produce less than 26 
tones of cherry coffee per year, and their production represents 41% of national production (ICAFE, 2011). 

In order to assess the CO

2e

 emissions for the farm level, a range of farms in the Costa Rican Central Valley coffee cluster 

were selected for the study. 

The farms were visited to collect data from the producers using a questionnaire; records of the farms were also reviewed to  
understand the usage of fossil fuels in different farm activities, agrochemicals and fertilizer, and electricity consumed during 
this period. 

The principal sources of emissions identified at farm level are presented in the following figure.

(Equation 5)

Total organic degradable 

material in wastewater for 

each industry sector

=

Total industry product * Wastewater generated *Chemical Oxygen Demand

(Equation 6)

Emission factor

=

Maximum Methane Producing Capacity* Methane Correction Factor for the Treatment

(Equation 7)

Net methane emissions

=

((Total organic degradable material in wastewater  – Sludge removed)*(Emission factor 
for treatment system)) – Recovered CH

4

(Equation 8)

CO

2e 

        

(Net methane emissions)*(44/16)

(Equation 7)

Consumption (TJ)  = Consumption (mass, volume or energy unit) * Conversion factor (TJ/unit)

(Equation 8)

Emission of CO

2

= Consumption (TJ) * Emission factor (Kg CO

2

/ TJ) * Efficiency factor (0.98)

Emission of CH

4

= Consumption (TJ) * Emission factor (Kg CH

4

/ TJ) * Efficiency factor (0.98)

Emission of N

2

O = Consumption (TJ) * Emission factor (Kg N

2

O/ TJ) * Efficiency factor (0.98)

(Equation 9)

CO

2e

=

Emission of CO

*1(GWP) + Emission of CH

*25(GWP) + Emission of N

2

*298(GWP)

(Equation 10)

Carbon footprint = emissions ÷ green coffee

kg CO

2

/kg green coffee =  kg CO

2

 emitted ÷ kg green coffee produced or processed

background image

Figure 5.

 Overview of the sources of emissions identified at farm level.

It is important to note that the farms evaluated produce coffee under shade in a poly-culture system. Coffee plants and shade 
trees are CO

2

-fixing; plants absorb CO

2

 from the atmosphere though photosynthesis and use light energy to run enzyme-

catalyzed reactions; in this process plants produce sugars and other organic compounds for growth and metabolism (FAO,  
2001). The absorbed carbon goes to form above-ground biomass, as well as roots.

Wasmman and Vlek (2004) indicate that there is an equilibrium point when no more carbon is stored. That is when new 
carbon fixation is cancelled out by attrition of trees. This carbon will eventually return to the atmosphere if and when the 
trees are liquidated.  According to Hester and Harrison (2010) carbon accumulated in leaves comes back to the atmosphere  
after a relatively short period of time, when the fallen leaves decompose. Carbon in wood is stored for years; the time  
depends on the tree species, growing condition, and on various uncertain occurrences such as fire or diseases.

According   to   this   information,   fixation   and   emissions   of   carbon   through   the   decomposition   of   organic   matter   in   an  
established   coffee-producing   system   are   in   a   constant   balance;   leaves   and   wood   from   pruning   practices   eventually 
decompose and carbon stored is released into the atmosphere. In Costa Rica, the pruning system on coffee varies depending 
on the technical criteria; the total pruning is done above 40 cm to 50 cm, and renovation of coffee plantation varies between 
15 and 20 years (Melo and Abarca, 2008).  

Since PAS 2050 excludes carbon stored in living organisms, such as trees or perennial crops (Naponen 

et al

., 2011), the 

carbon stored in the coffee stem and shade trees were not considered in this study for the carbon inventory.  

3.3.2

Central mill

After   the   harvest,   the   producers   bring   their   coffee   from   the   farm   to   the   central   mill,   where   the   coffee   cherries   are 
concentrated and processed as parchment, and then it is converted into green coffee. This study evaluates two different  
milling facilities with these characteristics. The mills are located in the Central Valley of Costa Rica.

The milling process used in Costa Rica is the wet process, a common practice in Central America. The wet milling process 
is the practice used to convert the cherry coffee into green coffee at the central mill (Alvarado and Rojas, 2007). This  
process   consists   in   selection,   washing,   natural   fermentation,   de-pulping   and   drying.   From   washing   to   de-pulping   a 
considerable amount of water is used. After wet processing, the water contains coffee mucilage

2

; this wastewater was 

sampled and a lab carried out COD

3

  analyses; these results were used in the calculations (specifically in equation 7) to 

obtain the emissions of methane through the decomposition of organic matter in wastewater.

In addition,  the records and information of fossil fuels, electricity, administrative activities, and the amount of biomass  
burned to dry coffee were collected for both mills. The sources of emissions identified for the milling process are presented 
in figure 6.

2

 The mucilage contains 50% sugars, 33% protein and pectin, and 17% dashes (Gutierrez, 1994)

3

 Chemical Oxygen Demand

background image

Figure 6.

 Overview of the source of emissions identified for the milling process.

3.3.3

Exportation  

According to ICAFE (2011) 18% of coffee production of Costa Rica is sold in the local market and 82% is exported. The 
United States is the principal market destination, representing 56% of the total exportation, and 39% is exported to Europe 
(PROCOMER, 2011): Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and Portugal are the main buyers in Europe. 

This study evaluated coffee exported to Europe. In this stage, a number of actors are involved in the transporting process -  
from the central mill to its final destination in a warehouse in Europe, as explained below: 

The information collected at this point is related to land transportation from the mill to port in Costa Rica: records of fossil  
fuels consumed were obtained. With regard to overseas transportation, information was obtained on both the amount of 
containers, the weight in tons of coffee exported, as well the distance in kilometers (7869 km) from Costa Rica to Europe.  
In the absence of data from a particular carrier of the land transport in Europe from port to warehouse, an average of 600 km 
was used as the distance from port to the final destination. The sources of emissions identified for the process of exportation  
are detailed in figure 7.

Figure 7.

 Overview of the source of emissions identified for the process of exportation.

3.3.4

The processes in Europe

In order to assess the remaining carbon footprint of the coffee value chain, findings of an existing study were used. This 
information was obtained from a case study that evaluates the carbon footprint of coffee processed in Germany (PCF 
Pilotprojekt   Deutschland,   2008).   Originally,   this   information  was   given   in  g   CO

2e

  per   cup,  but   for   standardizing  the 

functional unit defined in this study it was converted into kg of CO

2e

 per kg of green coffee. PAS 2050 permit the use of 

secondary data from a published study or other source to calculate the impact of downstream life cycle stages (DEFRA and 
BSI, 2011).   

background image

The information of processes within Europe included the following stages: roasting, packaging, distribution, grinding and 
purchasing, consumption and disposal. The modeling of these stages is detailed in figure 8.

Figure 8.

 Overview of the source of emissions identified for the process in Europe.

Electric energy is relevant in the roasting process; the general German electricity network provides this service. Besides  
electric energy, natural gas is also used in the roasting phase, and nitrogen gas is applied injected into the package to  
preserve the beans. The direct emissions of CO

2

 from roasting coffee beans are excluded, since PAS 2050 exclude biogenic 

carbon sources from the assessment. 

The roasted coffee is then packaged and distributed to retailers. Packaging includes primary and secondary packaging for 
the handling and delivery of the coffee as well as consumer packaging. The packaging used by end consumers includes a 
bag and a clip per 500 g of ground coffee. Electricity used at this stage is also significant in terms of emissions.

During the distribution stage, the roasted coffee is transported from the roasting plant to the coffee shop stores. From the 
roasting plant in Hamburg, the roasted coffee beans are delivered to the centre (Gallin) by lorries. From here the coffee is 
distributed to three different distribution points: Bremen, Gerhnsheim and Neumarkt. From these distribution centers the 
coffee is transported to affiliated shops. 

At the point of purchase, it has been assumed that not only one package of 500 g of coffee is purchased but also a whole  
basket of commodities with an overall weight of 20 kg.  It is also assumed that the products come with a shopping bag made  
from low-density polyethylene, as secondary packaging.  The purchase is done by car in an average distance of 5 km. 

Consumers use different methods to prepare coffee: French press, filter drip, and automatic coffee machine. To prepare a  
cup of coffee using a French press, 125 g of water is needed, together with 0.0141 kwh of electricity.  For filter drip coffee,  
0.0125 kwh, and for an automatic coffee machine 0.085 kwh.   Data drawn from the combination of these preparation  
methods is used.

The end-of life phase took into account the disposal of primary and secondary packaging and coffee grounds. The coffee 
skin from the roasting plant is used to generate thermal energy and as a substitute for wood pallets and natural gas.

background image

4

Findings

The following section addresses the potential carbon footprint of Costa Rican coffee. Additionally is presented a case study  
of the contribution of mitigation measures implemented at the stage of the milling process. 

4.1

The Processes in Costa Rica

The carbon footprint calculated for the Costa Rican coffee, from farm level to a European warehouse is 1.93 kg of CO

2e 

per 

kilogram of green coffee (Figure 9).  

As the figure below indicates, the emissions at farm level are the greatest (53%), followed by the central mill (33%), and  
finally the process of exportation to Europe (14%).

Figure 9.

 Carbon footprint of three stages of the coffee supply chain

PAS 2050 classifies as “high intensity” emissions in a range of 1-3 kg CO

2

  per kg. Products in this category include: 

greenhouse crops, rice and dairy (DEFRA and BSI, 2011). According to this classification this coffee carbon footprint is 
technically considered a high intensity source of emissions. 

The following section describes in detail the contribution of the respective processes in the value chain.

4.1.1

Farm Level

This stage represents the most carbon intensive of the processes in Costa Rica. The farm level is responsible for 53% 
(Figure 8) of total carbon footprint calculated for the processes in Costa Rica, or 1.02 kg of CO

2e  

per kilogram of green 

coffee (Table 1). 

Fertilizers   represent   the   highest   inputs   on   the   farm,  both   from   the   production   of   chemical   fertilizers   and   due   to   N-
fertilization:   N

2

O   emissions   of   leaching   and   volatilization.  95%   of   the   emissions   at   this   stage   come   from   fertilizers 

(Table 1). In contrast the emissions from pesticides represent just 1%. Emissions from fossil fuels total 3%, mostly for the 
transportation of coffee cherries to the gathering centers. Electricity represents 2% of the emissions at the farm level.

Table 1.

  Carbon footprint at farm level

Emission source

CO

2e

 Emission 

kg CO

2e

/ kg green coffee 

%

Fertilizers 

0.96

95

Fossil fuels: diesel, gas, others

0.03

3

Electricity

0.02

2

Pesticides

0.01

1

Total

1.02

100

background image

4.1.2

Central Mill

The central mill contributes 33% (Figure 8) of emissions in Costa Rica, which represent 0.64 kg of CO

2e  

per kilogram of 

green coffee (Table 2). 

The process of wet milling requires substantial amounts of water. After the wet processing, the remaining wastewater  
retains large amounts of solids and decomposing sugars. When this wastewater is not treated, it represents a source of 
pollution mainly if it is dumped directly into local water bodies. Additionally, the process releases gases such as methane 
(CH

4

), which has a global warming potential much higher than CO

2

. The emissions from untreated wastewater account for 

80% of the total emissions at this stage (Table 2).  

Table 2.

 Carbon footprint at central mill

Emission source

CO

2e

 Emission 

kg CO

2e

/kg green coffee 

%

Decomposition of organic matter in wastewater

0.514

80

Fossil fuels: diesel, gas, others

0.097

15

Administrative activities

0.031

5

Biomass burning

0.002

0.3

Total

0.644

100

4.1.3

Exportation Stage

Exporting one kilogram of green coffee from Costa Rica to Europe produces 0.27 kg of CO

2e 

(Table 3) and represents 14% 

of the emissions in Costa Rica (Figure 8). 

The overseas transportation is the main factor in terms of CO

2e

 emissions at this stage (70%). The distance from Costa Rica 

to Europe explains the large percentage of emissions for this phase. 

Table 3.

 Carbon footprint of the exportation stage

Emission source

CO

2e

 Emission 

kg CO

2e

/kg green coffee 

%

Sea transportation

0.185

70

Transportation by land from port to storage destination

0.041

15

Transportation by land from mill to port 

0.033

12

Administrative activities

0.006

2

Total

0.27

100 

In order to obtain the carbon footprint of the processes within Europe (from roasting processes to disposal of the waste 
generated) results from existing literature were used. These results are presented in the following section.

4.2

Processes in Europe at destination

The carbon footprint related to the processes in Europe is 3.05 kg of CO

2e  

per kilogram of green coffee (Table 4), which 

represents 61% of total emissions (Figure 9).

As the table below indicates, emissions are released in the roasting process (6%), packaging (4%), distribution (5%), 
grinding and purchasing (9%); the emission by consumption are the greatest (71%), and from the end-of phase (disposal)  
(5%).

background image

Table 4.

 Carbon footprint of the processes in Europe

Stage

CO

2e

 Emission

kg CO

2e

/kg green coffee

%

Roasting

0.19

6

Packaging

0.13

4

Distribution

0.15

5

Grinding + purchasing

0.29

9

Consumption

2.15

71

Disposal

0.14

5

Total

3.05

100

Source: PCF Pilotprojekt Deutschland (2008).

In the roasting stage, emissions are mainly driven by both electricity supply and provision of thermal energy. According to 
PAS 2050 the direct CO

2e

 emissions of the roasting process are not included as they originate from biogenic source (PCF 

Pilotprojekt Deutschland, 2008).

  The consumption stage is the most intensive source of emission and has a big impact on the overall carbon footprint; 
emissions at this stage come from the high demand of energy required for the preparation of coffee with an automatic coffee  
machine. The carbon footprint at this point is 2.15 kg CO

2e

/kg green coffee, higher than the sum of the emissions from all 

other stages in Europe.

In the following section the results of the carbon footprint in Costa Rica were combined with the results of the processes 
within Europe in order to obtain the total carbon footprint of the Costa Rican coffee supply chain. 

4.3

Overall Results

The total carbon footprint calculated for Costa Rican coffee across its full supply chain is 4.98 kg of CO

2e  

per kilogram of 

green coffee. The carbon footprint covered all processes conducted in Costa Rica and Europe. Farm level to a European 
warehouse produced 1.93 kg of CO

2e  

per kilogram of green coffee, and processes in Europe produced a carbon footprint 

equal to 3.05 kg of CO

2e 

per kilogram of green coffee (Figure 10). 

As the figure below indicates, the main carbon emissions in the coffee supply chain are released at farm level (20%), the  
central mill (13%), and the process of consumption (43%). The carbon footprint at this point is 2.15 kg CO

2e

/kg green 

coffee, higher than the total emissions released by the process carried out in Costa Rica (1.93 kg CO

2e

/kg green coffee)

Figure 10.

 Carbon footprint of Costa Rican coffee supply chain.

background image

PAS 2050 classifies as “very high intensity” emissions in a range of > 5 kg CO

2

 per kg. Products in this category include 

some concentrated foodstuffs (DEFRA and BSI, 2011). According to this classification the carbon footprint of Costa Rican  
coffee is technically considered a very high intensity source of emissions. 

However, comparing the results of this study with other carbon studies on coffee, the level of emissions produced by Costa 
Rican coffee is lower (4.98 kg of CO

2e  

per kilogram of green coffee) than the total carbon footprint of a study of coffee 

exported   to   Germany,   which   showed   emissions   equivalent   to   7.15 kg of CO

2e  

per   kilogram   of   green   coffee

4

  (PCF 

Pilotprojekt Deutschland, 2008). Differences are mainly concentrated at farm level by the use of fertilizers. 

The following section describes in detail the contribution of the respective processes in the supply chain to the resulting 
carbon footprint.

4.4

Hot Spots 

The hot spots identified by this study are: fertilizers applied at farm, wastewater as a result of the wet milling process, and 
the electricity used for the preparation of coffee consumption using an automatic coffee machine. These emissions are  
collectively responsible for 72% of total emissions in the supply chain evaluated. 

Figure 11 shows in detail the contribution of each emission source in the potential carbon footprint of the Costa Rican 
coffee.

Figure 11.

 Hot spots identified. 

These results show the prominence of specific emissions variables for each component in the coffee supply chain. This can  
help to guide and establish mitigation strategies that can form the basis for action and reduce the impact of these activities 
on the environment. 

The following section presents a specific mitigation strategy implemented at the milling stage; it includes the resulting 
implications of this strategy on the reduction of emissions.

4.5

Mitigation Possibility at Milling Stage

This section reveals  the  results of mitigation  practices  implemented in the central  mill  evaluated  by this study.  This  
mitigation effort is specifically focused on treating the wastewater generated after the milling process. The data for potential  
emissions is linked to the information presented in section 4.3 (overall results). The result of mitigation practices at this 
stage make a substantial difference to resulting emissions (Figure 12).

4

 Information originally given in g CO

2e

 per cup, and converted into kg of CO

2e

 per kg of green coffee

background image

In terms of carbon footprint, the mitigation efforts carried out in the central mill represent a reduction of 9% or 0.46 kg CO

2e 

per kilogram of green coffee. This means that producing one kilogram of green coffee under these conditions reduces the 
potential emissions equal from 4.98 kg CO

2e

 to 4.52 kg CO

2e

 (Figure 12). 

Figure 12.

 Results of mitigation strategy implemented in the central mill

Mitigation was achieved in the following way: one bio-digester or anaerobic reactor in each mill reprocesses the remaining 
wastewater. The decomposition of sugars and solids (contained in the coffee mucilage) in an anaerobic environment break 
down this organic matter into biogas (methane CH

4

). The biogas obtained is burned in the coffee dryers. (The equivalent in 

CO

from burning this gas is much less than if the gas were emitted as methane

5

 or if the wastewater were not treated). 

Based on the assumption that most countries have regulations to restrict dumping of untreated wastewater, it can be inferred 
that most mills in the region have some type of wastewater treatment system in order to operate legally. These measures 
could be considered as part of a mitigation effort, though the treatment systems would need to be assessed in order to 
establish their real impacts on emissions and the potential financial cost of implementation and that they could represent.

5

Implications

In order to reduce the carbon footprint of coffee during its life cycle, the multiple actors implicated in the supply chain need 
to establish concrete actions or strategies to address the principal sources of emissions.  Emissions vary across each stage of 
the chain; hence it is reasonable to focus first on managing the key hot spots identified.

Large companies such as roasters and retailers could engage their suppliers in order to manage their GHG emissions in a 
more integrated and collaborative way, with a common plan and focused efforts to optimize efficiency. 

It  is also important to consider the promotion of technical  upgrades  at producer level – for example improving their 
management practices through training programs in order that they optimize the use of inputs on the farm, specifically the  
use of fertilizers. These actions can reduce the carbon footprint at farm level. 

Efforts should also be focused on the milling process, specifically proper management of wastewater. This study has given  
an example of how biogas can be produced from wastewater and the use of that gas used for the drying process of coffee.  
This effort  reduced  the carbon footprint significantly.  Nevertheless,  a cost benefit  analysis of the implementation and 
operation of the anaerobic reactors would be needed in order to understand its financial viability. 

With regards to overseas transportation, companies involved at exportation stage could proactively seek to work with 
shipping companies that are actively working on reducing their own footprints. 

5

 The Global-warming potential of methane is 25 times more than carbon dioxide (IPCC, 2007).

background image

Stakeholders involved in the coffee value chain have to take into account  that consumers are now more aware about  
environmental issues – including their own consumption. Increasingly, they are asking companies to provide information on 
emissions of products and services that they purchase and seeking to reduce their own footprints.

Aside from the potential cost savings to be made in reduction of carbon in the supply chain (e.g. through energy, fertilizers 
or transport  costs, the proper  management  of emissions is also an opportunity for companies to develop  competitive 
advantages   in  the   marketing  of  their   products  or  services.  Some  are  already   actively  doing  so.  Despite   the   fact   that 
sustainable practices and reduction of carbon emissions are still largely voluntary in most countries, there is a growing move 
towards regulation and carbon credit schemes that seek to incentivize and reward business for adopting carbon reduction 
strategies. For this reason it is increasingly important to invest in reduce or even neutralizing the carbon footprint in the 
supply chain.  Australia, by way of example, is facing an emerging new business landscape in this respect; the transition to a 
low-carbon economy has begun (KPMG, 2012 and PWC, 2012), and with the Clean Energy Act 2011 that came into effect  
in 2012, government  has introduced a price on carbon to entities with greater emissions such as energy;  even though 
agricultural emissions are not yet covered, it will face indirect effects through the increase of costs of electricity, amongst 
other utilities.

Compared with other  agricultural  products such as banana or  pineapple that can  be consumed as fresh products, the 
consumption of coffee requires a considerable amount of CO

2e

, as was evidenced in this study, largely due to the highly 

energy demand from automatic coffee machines. Consumers also therefore play a critical role in the life cycle of coffee; as 
the   most   significant   contributor   to   the   overall   footprint,   they   are   directly   part   of   the   problem   and   should   take   the 
responsibility to minimize their own impact. Interesting work could also be done in improving the energy efficiency of 
coffee machines in this regard.  Some companies (that manufacture products such as shampoo, with a similar consumer-
heavy footprint) have embarked on consumer-focused campaigns to raise awareness and reduce water and energy usage at 
point of use.

The effecting of a range of policies and tools can reduce net carbon emissions from the supply chain too. According to the 
World Bank (2012) the carbon market has demonstrated that it is an effective tool in reducing GHG emissions. Based in the  
principle that polluters pay, Bowen (2011) suggest that a uniform global carbon price delivered by carbon taxes or carbon 
trading would be an ideal tool to reduce GHG emissions in a cost-effective way. In Europe for example, the carbon price in  
the market varies between US$ 18.8/tone 

(€ 13.5/ton) 

and US$ 12.9/tone 

(€ 9.2/ton) (Kossoy and Guigon, 2012), which can 

be translated to US$ 0.019 and US$ 0.013 per kilogram of CO

2e 

emitted.

 

Therefore, if the externality cost associated to the 

carbon footprint calculated were applied on coffee, it would vary between US$ 0.09 and US$ 0.06 per kilogram of coffee. 

This cost should be shared out amongst the key actors involved and thereby it would be reflected in the 

‘social cost

6

 

of 

coffee.

6

Conclusions

Coffee has considerable impact on the environment; the carbon footprint of the coffee supply chain calculated in this study  
is classified as a product with very high intensity emissions. Most emissions come from a few sources, which account for 
most of the impact generated per unit produced. In this sense focused mitigation efforts should be easier to implement. The  
hot spots identified produce about 72% of total emissions across the coffee supply chain evaluated, these are: fertilizers  
applied at farm level, wastewater as a result of the wet milling process, and the preparation of coffee using an automatic  
coffee machine due to the consumption of coffee in Europe.

A greater understanding of the topic and lessons learned by other business can be beneficial in helping to manage the carbon 
footprint   generated.   For   instance,   this   study   presented   a   mitigation   strategy   implemented   in   the   milling   process   for 
managing wastewater, the result of which significantly reduced the carbon emissions. 

6

 The social cost includes the private costs plus the externalities costs (Mankiw, 1998).

background image

Complementary studies are necessary to determine the real impact of the poly-culture system in the fixing and storing of 
carbon in order to establish the potential compensation of GHG emissions, mostly in the early growing stages of the plants. 

For those involved in the coffee supply chain; this carbon footprint study reveals a useful perspective on carbon emissions  
through the life cycle of the product. The concern over GHG emissions and climate change is growing, so an effective 
management of carbon generated can only imply long-term benefits to both business and the environment. 

Finally, as consumers are also directly and significantly part of the story on the coffee carbon footprint, they must be 
involved in the task of reducing its impact and be part of the solution. 

7

References

ADEME (Agency for Environment and Energy Management). 2009

. 1

st

 Bilan carbone global railway carbon footprint. 

The Rhine-Rhone 

LGV Serving Sustainable Europe.

 

France. 

 

[On line] [visited Sep 3, 2012]. Available in the 

World Wide Web

: <http://www.bilan-

carbone-lgvrr.fr/userfiles/file/documents/Bilan_Carbone_GB.pdf>

Alvarado, M. and Rojas, G. 2007. 

El cultivo y beneficiado de café

. EUNED. 2da reimpresión, 1era ed. San José (CR). 184 p. ISBN: 9977-

64-768-2.  [On   line]   [visited   Aug   10,   2012].   Available   in   the  

World   Wide   Web

:   <http://books.google.co.cr/books?id=15qrSG-

51l4C&dq=πel+beneficiado+de+café+en+costa+rica,+CICAFE&hl=es&source=gbs_navlinks_s>

Brenton, P.; Edward-Jones, G.; and Friis, M. 2009. 

Carbon labelling and low-income country exports: a review of the development issues

[On   line]   [visited   Aug   21,   2012].   Available   in   the  

World   Wide   Web

:   <http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-

7679.2009.00445.x/abstract>

Bowen, A. 2011.  

The case of carbon pricing

. Grantham Research Intitute on Climate Change and the Environment, and Centre for  

Climate Change Economics and Policy. London (UK). 36 p.   [On line] [Visited Oct 16, 2012]. Available in the 

World Wide Web

<http://www2.lse.ac.uk/GranthamInstitute/publications/Policy/docs/PB_case-carbon-pricing_Bowen.pdf>

CEPAL  (Comisión   Económica   para   América   Latina).  2010.  

Metodologías   de   cálculo   de   la   huella   de   carbono   y   sus   potenciales  

implicaciones   para   América   Latina

.  [On   line]   [Visited   Aug   23,   2012].   Available   in   the  

World   Wide   Web

<http://es.scribd.com/doc/36469816/Metodologias-de-calculo-de-Huella-de-Carbono-y-sus-implicaciones-America-Latina-
Documento-de-Trabajo-CEPAL-2010>

Chacón, A.; Montenegro, J.; and Sasa, J. 2009.  

Inventario nacional de gases de efecto invernadero y absorción de carbono en Costa  

Rica.  

Ministerio de Ambiente, Energía y Telecomunicaciones.

 

San José (CR). [On line] [visited Aug 17, 2012]. Available in the 

World Wide Web

: <http://cglobal.imn.ac.cr/sites/default/files/documentos/inventario_gases_efecto_invernadero.pdf>

CIDIAC  (Carbon Dioxide  Information  Analysis  Center).  2012.  

CO

2

  emissions from Costa Rica.

  [On line] [visited  Aug 21, 2012]. 

Available in the 

World Wide Web

: <http://cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/emis/cos.html>

CIRAD (Agricultural Research for Development). 2012. 

Coffee

. Montpellier (FR). [On line] [visited Oct 6, 2012]. Available in the 

World 

Wide Web

: <http://www.cirad.fr/en/research-operations/supply-chains/coffee/context-and-issues>

Consumers International. 2005. 

From bean to cup: how consumer choice impacts upon coffee producers and the environment. 

London 

(UK).   64   p.  

  [On   line]   [visited   Sep   15,   2012].   Available   in   the

 

World   Wide   Web

<http://www.consumersinternational.org/media/306514/coffee%20report%20(english).pdf>

DEFRA (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs). 2008

. Methods review to support the PAS for the calculation of the  

embodied greenhouse gas emissions of good and services. 

London (UK).

 

[On line] [visited Sep 3, 2012]. Available in the 

World  

Wide Web

: <http://randd.defra.gov.uk/Document.aspx?Document=EV02074_7071_FRP.pdf>

DEFRA   (Department   for   Environment,   Food  and   Rural   Affairs)   and  BSI  (British  Standards   Institution).   2011.

  The   guide   to   PAS 

2050:2011: how to carbon footprint your producs, identify hotspots and reduce emissions in your supply chain. 

London (UK):  79 p. 

ISBN 978-0-580-77432-4. 

DEFRA (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) and DECC (Department of Energy and Climate change) 2012. 2012 

Guidelines   to   DEFRA.    

[On   line]   London   (UK):   [visited   June   24,   2012].   Available   in   the  

World   Wide   Web

<http://www.defra.gov.uk/publications/2012/05/30/pb13773-2012-ghg-conversion/>

EPA (Environmental Protection Agency). 2012.

 Glossary of climate change terms. 

[On line]. United States (US) [visited June 24, 2012]. 

Available in the 

World Wide Web

: <http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/glossary.html#C>

ESRL (Earth System Research Laboratory). 2012a.

 Trends in atmospheric carbon dioxide. 

[On line]. United States (US) [visited Oct 23, 

2011]. Available in the 

World Wide Web

: <http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/ccgg/trends/>

ESRL   (Earth  System   Research  Laboratory).   2012b.

  The   earth  atmosphere.  

[On  line].   United  States  (US)  [visited   June   23,   2011]. 

Available in the 

World Wide Web

: <http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/outreach/carbon_toolkit/basics.html>

Fairtrade Foundation. 2012. 

Fairtrade and coffee: commodity briefing

. 25 p. London (UK). [On line] [visited Oct 7, 2012]. Available in 

the 

World Wide Web

: <www.fairtrade.org.uk/includes/documents/cm_docs/2012/F/FT_Coffee_Report_May2012.pdf>

FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of United Nations). 2001.  

Plantation as greenhouse gas mitigation: a short review.

  Report 

based on the work of P. Moura-Costa and L. Auckland.  Forestry Department. 

 

Rome (IT). 18 p. 

Field, C. and Raupach, M. 2004.  

The global carbon cycle: integrating humans, climate, and the natural world

. Scientific Comitee on 

Problems of the Environment (SCOPE). Washington DC (US). 524 p. ISBN: 1-55963-527-4.  [On line] [Visited Aug 15, 2012]. 
Available

 

in

 

the

 

World

 

Wide

 

Web

:

 

<http://books.google.co.cr/books?

background image

id=qcjuz5SWj9wC&pg=PA210&lpg=PA210&dq=Chlorofluorocarbons+(CFCS),+hydrofluorocarbons+(HFCs),+perfluorocarbons+
(PFCs)+and+sulfur+hexafluoride+(SF6)&source=bl&ots=uAnrsWrE88&sig=hVkGoKGNMdslxj234KbZCsT1vrg&hl=es>

Flessa, H.  

et al

. 2002.  

Integrated evaluation of greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, N2O) from two farming system in southern  

Germany.  

Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, vol 91. p 175-189.

 

[On line] [visited July 5, 2012]. Available in the  

World 

Wide Web

: <http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167880901002341>

GFA. 2010

. Costa Rica: estudio del estado de la producción sostenible y propuesta de mecanismos permanentes para el fomento de la  

producción sostenible. 

Ministerio de Agricultura y Ganadería.  GFA Consulting Group. 417 p. San José (CR). 

 

[On line] [visited Oct 

4, 2012]. Available in the 

World Wide Web

: <http://www.mag.go.cr/bibliotecavirtual/a00186.pdf>

GHG Protocol. 2012

. About the GHG protocol. 

Greenhouse Gas Protocol. 

 

[On line] [visited Sep 4, 2012]. Available in the 

World Wide  

Web

: <http://www.ghgprotocol.org/about-ghgp>

Global Methane Initiative. 2010.

 Global methane emissions and mitigation opportunities.

 [On line] [visited Aug 27, 2012]. Available in 

the 

World Wide Web

: <http://www.globalmethane.org/documents/analysis_fs_en.pdf>

Gutierrez, G. 1994. 

Caficultura costarricense

. Atlas Agropecuario de Costa Rica. p 275-285

[On line] [visited May 10, 2012]. Available 

in

 

the

 

World

 

Wide

 

Web

:

 

<http://books.google.co.cr/books?

id=AWQqijADFrIC&pg=PA285&lpg=PA285&dq=componentes+del+mucilago+de+café&source=bl&ots=SqomP2nMva&sig=Kqi
vTzgPDYOUSOnZW1b8eFnsAlo&hl=es-419#v=onepage&q=componentes%20del%20mucilago%20de%20café&f=false>

Hester, R., and Harrison, R. 2010. 

Carbon capture: sequestration and storage.

 Issues in Environmental Science and Technology.  Vol 29. 

The Royal Society of Chemistry.  Cambridge (UK). 299 p. ISBN: 978-1-84755-917-3. 

ICAFE (Instituto del Café de Costa Rica). 2011. 

Informe sobre la actividad cafetalera de Costa Rica

.  [On line] [visited Aug 13, 2012]. 

Available   in   the  

World   Wide   Web

:   <http://www.icafe.go.cr/sector_cafetalero/estadsticas/infor_activ_cafetal/actual/Informe

%20Actividad%20Cafetalera%202011.pdf>

ICO (International Coffee Organization). 2012a. 

Monthly coffee market report

. [On line] [visited Oct 3, 2012]. Available in the 

World  

Wide Web

: <http://www.ico.org/documents/cmr-0712-e.pdf>

ICO (International Coffee Organization). 2012b. 

Exports by exporting countries to all destinations. 

London (UK). [On line] [visited Aug 

15, 2012]. Available in the 

World Wide Web

: <http://www.ico.org/trade_statistics.asp>

ICO (International Coffee Organization). 2011. 

World coffee trade

. [On line] [visited Oct 3, 2012]. Available in the 

World Wide Web

<http://www.ico.org/trade_e.asp?section=About_Coffee>

IMN (National Meteorological Institute). 2011.  

Factores de emision de gases de efecto invernadero.  

[On line] [visited June 5, 2012]. 

Available in the 

World Wide Web

: <http://cglobal.imn.ac.cr/documentos/factores-de-emision-gases-efecto-invernadero>

IPCC  (Intergovernmental  Panel on Climate  Change). 2005.

  Carbon dioxide: capture and storage.  

IPCC  Special report.   Metz, B., 

Davidson, O., Coninck, H., Loos, M., and Meyer, L. (eds). Cambridge University Press, (UK). 431 p. ISBN 4-88788-032-4. 

 

[On 

line]   [visited   Aug   20,   2012].   Available   in   the

 

World   Wide   Web

:   <https://docs.google.com/open?

id=0B1gFp6Ioo3akWFVURndxRU5xU1E>

IPCC (Intergovernmental  Panel on Climate Change). 2006a.

  2006 IPCC guidelines for national greenhouse gas inventories.  

Vol 2. 

Energy. Prepared by the National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Programme, Eggleston H.S., Buendia L., Miwa K., Ngara T., and  
Tanabe K. (eds). Published: IGES, Japan. ISBN 4-88788-032-4. 

 

[On line] [visited May 5, 2012]. Available in the 

World Wide Web

<http://www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/public/2006gl/vol2.html>

IPCC (Intergovernmental  Panel on Climate Change). 2006b.

  2006 IPCC guidelines for national greenhouse gas inventories.  

Vol 4. 

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use. Prepared by the National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Programme, Eggleston H.S.,  
Buendia L., Miwa K., Ngara T., and Tanabe K. (eds). Published: IGES, Japan. ISBN 4-88788-032-4.  

 

[On line] [visited May 5, 

2012].

 

Available

 

in

 

the

 

World

 

Wide

 

Web

:

 

<http://www.ipcc-

nggip.iges.or.jp/public/2006gl/pdf/4_Volume4/V4_11_Ch11_N2O&CO2.pdf>

IPCC (Intergovernmental  Panel on Climate Change). 2006c.

  2006 IPCC guidelines for national greenhouse gas inventories.  

Vol 5. 

Waste. Prepared by the National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Programme, Eggleston H.S., Buendia L., Miwa K., Ngara T., and  
Tanabe K. (eds). Published: IGES, Japan. ISBN 4-88788-032-4. 

 

[On line] [visited May 5, 2012]. Available in the 

World Wide Web

<http://www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/public/2006gl/vol5.html>

IPCC   (Intergovernmental   Panel   on   Climate   Change).   2007.

  Direct   global   warming   potentials.  

[On   line]   [visited   April   27,   2012]. 

Available in the 

World Wide Web

: <http://www.ipcc.ch/publications_and_data/ar4/wg1/en/ch2s2-10-2.html>

ISO (International Organization for Standardization). 2012. 

ISO/DIS 14067: Carbon Footprint of product; requirements and guidelines  

for   quantification   and   communication

.  [On   line]   [Visited   Sep   4,   2012].   Available   in   the  

World   Wide   Web

<http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/catalogue_tc/catalogue_detail.htm?csnumber=59521>

ITC (International Trade Centre). 2011. 

The coffee reporte’s guide

. 3rd ed. 46 p. Géneva, Switzerland.  ISBN: 978-92-9137-394-9. 

ITC  (International Trade Centre).  2012.  

Product carbon footprinting standardsin the agri-food sector

. Tecnical Paper. 46 p. Géneva, 

Switzerland.    [On line] [Visited Aug 22,  2012].  Available  in the  

World  Wide  Web

:  <http://www.intracen.org/Product-Carbon-

Footprinting-Standards-in-the-Agri-Food-Sector/>

Kossoy, A. and Guigón, P. 2012. 

State and trends of the carbon market: 2012

.  138 p. Washington DC (US).  [On line] [Visited Oct 10, 

2012].

 

Available

 

in

 

the

 

World

 

Wide

 

Web

<http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTCARBONFINANCE/Resources/State_and_Trends_2012_Web_Optimized_19035_Cvr&Txt
_LR.pdf>

KPMG. 2012. 

Managing the commercial implications of a price on carbon

.  Carbon Finance at World Bank 40 p. Australia.  [On line] 

[Visited   Oct   14,   2012].   Available   in   the  

World   Wide   Web

:   <http://www.group100.com.au/publications/g100-kpmg-managing-

commercial-implications-of-a-price-on-carbon-nov-2011.pdf>

background image

Mankiw, G. (1998). 

Principles of microeconomics.

 .  Harcourt Brace College Publishers. United States. 493 p. ISBN: 0-03-024502-8.

Melo, E. and Abarca, S. (2008). 

Cafetales para servicios ambientales, con énfasis en el potencial de sumideros de carbono: el caso de  

cooperativas cafetaleras afiliadas a COOCAFE Costa Rica.

 CATIE, FUNCAFOR, COOCAFE-OIKOCREDIT.  Costa Rica. 61 p. 

[On line] [visited Sep 10,  2012].  Available  in the  

World  Wide  Web

: <http://www.coocafe.com/cafeforestal/docs/cafe-servicios-

ecosist-co2.pdf>

Naponeon,  M.  

et  al

.  2012.  

Greenhouse  gas emissions  in  coffee  grown  with  different  input  levels under conventional  and  organic  

management

. In: Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment journal. p 6-15. Elsevier B.V. 

PCA (Pollution Control Agency). 2011.

 Discussion greenhouse gas emissions in environmental review. 

[On line]. Minessota (US) [visited 

July 13, 2012]. Available in the 

World Wide Web

: <http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/view-document.html?gid=12570>

PCF Pilotprojekt Deutschland. 2008.

  Case study tchibo private kaffee: rarity machare by tchibo GMBH.  

[On line] [visited April 27, 

2012]. Available in the 

World Wide Web

: <http://www.pcf-projekt.de/files/1232962944/pcf_tchibo_coffee.pdf>

Priess,   R.     2011.  

Beyond  reduced  consumption:   perspectives   for  climate   conpatible   consumption.  

Platform   for   climate   compatible 

consumption.   Berlin   (DE).   [On   line]   [visited   Sep   3,   2012].   Available   in   the  

World   Wide   Web

:   <http://www.pcf-

projekt.de/main/results/results-reports/>

PROCOMER (Promotora del Comercio Exterior de Costa Rica). 2011.

 Estadisticas de comercio exterior de Costa Rica: 2011. 

San José 

(CR).   240   p.   [On   line]   [visited   July   15,   2012].   Available   in   the

 

World   Wide   Web

<http://www.procomer.com/contenido/descargables/anuarios-estadisticos/anuario-estadistico-2010-v2.pdf>

PWC. 2012. 

Business briefing series: 20 issues on the business implications of a carbon cost

. 24 p. 2nd ed. Sydney (AU). ISBN: 978-

921245-62-6.

 [On   line]   [visited   Oct   15,   2012].   Available   in   the

 

World   Wide   Web

<http://www.slideshare.net/CharteredAccountants/business-briefings-20-issues-on-the-business-implications-of-carbon>

Reay, D. 

et al.

 2012. 

Global agriculture and nitrous oxide emissions

. Nature Climate Change Review. P 410-416. May 2012.  [On line] 

[Visited Aug 27, 2012]. Available in the 

World Wide Web

: <http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/v2/n6/full/nclimate1458.html>

Ruiz S. Musmanni S. 2007.  

Inventario e informe de gases con efecto invernadero

  (GEI). Estrategia Nacional de Cambio Climático, 

Iniciativa Ministerial. MINAE. 

Sevenster,   M.   and   Verhagen,   J.   2010.   GHG   emissions   of   green   coffee   production:  

toward   a   standard   methodology   for   carbon  

footprinting

.   <Delft.   [On   line]   [visited   May   4,   2012].   Available   in   the

 

World   Wide   Web

http://www.cedelft.eu/publicatie/ghg_emissions_of_green_coffee_production%3Cbr
%3Etoward_a_standard_methodology_for_carbon_footprinting/1117?PHPSESSID=2f5831eec6724b978d442075bfc45d02>

Smith   P.   Martino   D.,   Coordinating   Lead   Authors.  2007.  

Intergovernmental   Pannel   on   Climate   Change   Forth   Assessment   Report

Working group 3, Cap.8. 

Turner, D. 

et al. 

2012. 

 Towards standarization in GHG quantification and reporting. 

Carbon management 3. p 223-225. Future Science 

Group.   [On   line].   [visited   July   13,   2012].   Available   in   the

 

World   Wide   Web

:   <http://www.future-

science.com/doi/pdf/10.4155/cmt.12.26>

UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change). 1992. 

Definitions: article 1

.   25 p. [On line] [Visited Aug 17, 

2012]. Available in the 

World Wide Web

: <http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/convkp/conveng.pdf>

UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change). 2002. 

Climate change: information kit

. Switzerland. 64 p. [On 

line] [Visited Aug 17, 2012]. Available in the 

World Wide Web

: <http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/publications/infokit_2002_en.pdf>

USDA (United States Department of Agriculture). 2012. 

Coffee: world markets and trade

.  World Agricultural Service, Office of Global 

Analysis.  

  [On   line]   [visited   Oct   7,   2012].   Available   in   the

 

World   WideWeb

<http://www.fas.usda.gov/psdonline/circulars/coffee.pdf>

Wassman, R., and Vlek, P. 2004.  

Tropical agriculture in transition – opportunities for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions?.

 Kluwer 

Academic Publishers.  Vol 6. Netherlands (NL). 281 p. ISBN: 1-4020-1422-8. 

Wiedmann, T. and Minx, J. 2008. 

A Definition of 'Carbon Footprint'

. In: C. C. Pertsova, Ecological Economics Research Trends: Chapter 

1,  pp.  1-11,  Nova  Science Publishers, Hauppauge  NY.  [On line] [visited June  15,  2012].  Available  in the  

World  Wide  Web

<https://www.novapublishers.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=5999>

Willey,  Z. and Chameides, B. 2007.  

Harnessing farms and forests in the low carbon economy: how to create, measure and verify  

greenhouse gas offsets

. Duke University Press. Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions. North Carolina, US. 231 p. 

ISBN: 978-0-8322-4168-0. [On line] [Visited Aug 15, 2012]. Available in the 

World Wide Web

: <http://books.google.co.cr/books?

id=jAMQOfqiPsQC&pg=PA30&lpg=PA30&dq=nitrous+oxide+by+nitrogen+fertilizers&source=bl&ots=Vrblx3sssn&sig=s3fgfstIa
oy4z1DkLWLIzgo650U&hl=es#v=onepage&q=nitrous%20oxide%20by%20nitrogen%20fertilizers&f=false>

World Bank. 2012.  

Carbon finance at World Bank: at a glance.  

[On line] [visited Oct 10, 2012]. Available in the  

World Wide Web

<http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/NEWS/0,,contentMDK:21520231~menuPK:34480~pagePK:64257043~piPK:437
376~theSitePK:4607,00.html>

Wright,  L., Kemp, S. and Williams,  I.  2011.  

Carbon footprinting: towards a universally accepted definition.  

Carbon management. 

February 2011. Vol 2. No. 1. p 61-72. [On line] [visited July 13, 2012]. Available in the  

World Wide Web

: <http://www.future-

science.com/doi/abs/10.4155/cmt.10.39>


Document Outline