Anatolia

historical region, Asia
Alternate titles: Anadolu, Asia Minor
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Fast Facts
cave dwellings in Cappadocia
cave dwellings in Cappadocia
Major Events:
Russo-Turkish wars Greco-Turkish wars Jelali Revolts Syrian Wars Battle of Chaldiran
Key People:
St. Paul the Apostle Pompey the Great Ibn Battuta Galen Saint Irenaeus
Related Topics:
Cabeiri
Related Places:
Turkey Byzantine Empire Troy Ephesus Cappadocia
Top Questions

Where is Anatolia located?

When did the Mongols rule Anatolia?

When did the Phrygians arrive in Anatolia?

When did Anatolia become part of the Ottoman Empire?

Anatolia, Turkish Anadolu, also called Asia Minor, the peninsula of land that today constitutes the Asian portion of Turkey. Because of its location at the point where the continents of Asia and Europe meet, Anatolia was, from the beginnings of civilization, a crossroads for numerous peoples migrating or conquering from either continent.

This article discusses the history and cultures of ancient Anatolia beginning in prehistoric times and including the Hittite empire, the Achaemenian and Hellenistic periods, and Roman, Byzantine, and Seljuq rule. For later periods, see Ottoman Empire and Turkey, history of.

Ancient Anatolia

Prehistoric cultures of Anatolia

Anatolia may be defined in geographic terms as the area bounded to the north by the Black Sea, to the east and south by the Southeastern Taurus Mountains and the Mediterranean Sea, and to the west by the Aegean Sea and Sea of Marmara; culturally the area also includes the islands of the eastern Aegean Sea. In most prehistoric periods the regions to the south and west of Anatolia were under the influence of, respectively, Syria and the Balkans. Much visible evidence of the earliest cultures of Anatolia may have been lost owing to the large rise in sea levels that followed the end of the last Ice Age (about 10,000 years ago) and to deposition of deep alluvium in many coastal and inland valleys. Nevertheless, there are widespread—though little studied—signs of human occupation in cave sites from at least the Upper Paleolithic Period, and earlier Lower Paleolithic remains are evident in Yarımburgaz Cave near Istanbul. Rock engravings of animals on the walls of caves near Antalya, on the Mediterranean coast, suggest a relationship with the Upper Paleolithic art of western Europe. Associated with these are rock shelters, the stratified occupational debris of which has the potential finally to clarify the transitional phases between cave-dwelling society and the Neolithic economy of the first agricultural communities.

In the Middle East the first indications of the beginning of the Neolithic transition from food gathering to food producing can be dated to approximately 9000 bce; the true Neolithic began about 7300 bce, by which time farming and stock breeding were well established, and lasted until about 6250 bce. The Neolithic was succeeded by the Chalcolithic Period, during which metal weapons and tools gradually took their place beside their stone prototypes, and painted pottery came generally into use. The Chalcolithic ended in the middle centuries of the 4th millennium bce, when the invention of writing foreshadowed the rise of the great dynastic civilizations of Egypt and Mesopotamia, and was followed by periods of more advanced metalworking known as the Early and Middle Bronze Ages.

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