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N E W   F O R M A T !

BIGGER & MORE EXCITING 

THAN EVER 

COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL

IN BRIGHTEST DAY AND 

BLACKEST NIGHT...

INSIDE:

Geoff Johns on 

Green Lantern: 

Rebirth

YOUR COMPLETE GUIDE TO COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL

COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: 

SAN DIEGO • JULY 14-17, 2005

WONDERCON  

FEBRUARY 18-20, 2005

3

2005

WILL

EISNER

Inside: 

Celebrating 

a Legend

SAN DIEGO • JULY 14-17, 2005

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Comic-Con International is the largest convention in North America covering comic books, science fiction, 
fantasy, animation

movies, television and related pop culture. If you’re feeling as clueless as a resident of 

Bizarro World (or if you don’t have any idea what Bizarro World is), here are some fast facts about CCI.

Comic-Con International San Diego

 is a nonprofit four-day event that started with around 300

 

people 

back in 1970 at the U.S. Grant Hotel. Comic-Con has grown considerably since then: the 2004 show saw 
87,000 general attendees and 7,900 exhibitors, occupying the entire

 

San Diego Convention Center.

This Update 

is chock full of information about the 2005 show, and here are some helpful definitions to help 

you better understand what you’re reading:

•The Exhibit Hall

 is where companies and retailers exhibit their merchandise and where attendees can 

find everything from old and new comic books to collectible cards, from action figures to original paint-
ings, from videogames to movie props. It’s kind of like a gigantic museum, but you can purchase things on 
display. If you’ve ever seen Comic-Con on TV, this is usually where the footage was shot.  

• Programming 

is held in meeting rooms where people in the comics and related industries offer presenta-

tions and panel discussions, including looks at major new comics projects and upcoming Hollywood studio 
blockbusters, plus seminars and hands-on workshops. These events are 

the

 place to get questions answered 

and find out juicy tidbits about upcoming projects.

•The Masquerade

 isn’t a costume ball, it’s a contest (held on Saturday night) in which entrants display their 

fabulous threads on stage. This Update contains an interview with a Masquerade judge that offers more 
details on how to compete. 

•The Eisners 

is short for the Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards, the comic book industry equivalent of the 

Oscars, held in the Convention Center Ballroom on Friday night. These awards are named after the late Will 
Eisner, pioneer writer/artist of comics and graphic novels.

•Gaming 

refers to activities in which folks participate in

 

role-playing, trading

 

card, or any other type of 

other-worldly games. Comic-Con offers several gaming rooms at the Convention Center, plus nighttime 
gaming at the Hyatt.

•Anime

 is insider’s lingo for animation created in Japan. Last year Comic-Con dedicated three rooms to 

anime screenings all through the day and into the wee hours of the night.

•Films

 seems like an obvious term, but at Comic-Con International you get to see cinema classics late at 

night, including some of the finest in genre-related movie favorites from way back when to just last year. 
And the Comic-Con International Independent Film Festival continues to grow with some of the finest 
filmmakers of tomorrow showing their work to audiences, many for the very first time. And when it comes 
to the film world, Comic-Con has also become a hotbed for studios to present exclusive previews of highly 
anticipated genre movies.

•And speaking of Exclusives

, many limited-edition items are sold or given away 

only

 to Comic-Con attend-

ees.

The next Comic-Con International

 is July 14-17, with a Preview Night to pre-registered attendees on 

Wednesday, July 13. Further details on this and many other events are located in the pages that follow. So 
press on, true believers, your adventure awaits . . .

JUST THE FACTS, MA’AM . . .

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COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

President

 John Rogers

Secretary

 Mary Sturhann

Treasurer

 Mark Yturralde

Vice Presidents

Events

 Robin Donlan

Exhibits

 Beth Holley

Operations

 William Pittman

Directors at Large

Frank Alison

Ned Cato Jr.

Dan Davis

Eugene Henderson

Eddie Ibrahim

Martin Jaquish

James Jira

Executive Director

Fae Desmond

Director of Marketing and 

Public Relations

David Glanzer

HR/Guest Relations

Sue Lord

VIP Liaison

Maija Gates-Johnson

Director of Programming

Gary Sassaman

Eisner Awards Administrator

Jackie Estrada

Exhibits Managers

Justin Dutta

Professional Registration

Maryanne Snell

Anna-Marie Villegas

Exhibitor Registration

Kevin Hatch

EVENTS

At-Show Newsletter

Chris Sturhann

Films

John Cassels

Games

Ken Kendall

Masquerade

Martin Jaquish

Japanese Animation

John Davenport

Josh Ritter

Technical Services

Tristan Gates

EXHIBITS

Art Auction/Artists’ Alley

Clydene Nee

Art Show

LaFrance Bragg

Autograph Area

Katherine Forster Morrison

Exhibit Floor Manager

Andy Manzi

Convention Services

Taerie Bryant

OPERATIONS

Archivist

Eugene Henderson

Disabled Services

Saphora Horinek

Hospitality Suite

Mikee Reynante

Logistics

Dan Davis

Materials Chief/Blood Drive

Craig Fellows

Registration

Frank Alison & John Smith

Volunteers

Luigi Diaz & Wayne Hyde

Information Coordinator

Bruce & Betty Frankle

UPDATE

Richard Andreoli

Fae Desmond

Jackie Estrada

David Glanzer

Scott Saavedra

Gary Sassaman

Dan “The Man” Vado

MISSION STATEMENT:

Comic-Con International is a nonprofit educational organization dedi-

cated to creating awareness of, and appreciation for, comics and related 

popular art forms, primarily through the presentation of conventions and 

events that celebrate the historic and ongoing contribution of comics to 

art and culture.

ABOUT THE COVER: 

Art by Will Eisner. Coloring by Batton Lash. 

TM & © 2005 Will Eisner

COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL 2005 UPDATE #1

Published by Comic-Con International. All material, unless otherwise noted, is 
© 2005 Comic-Con International and may not be reproduced without permis-
sion. All other artwork is TM & © 2005 by respective owners. Printed in Canada.

Comic-Con International, P.O. Box 128458, San Diego, CA 92112-8458.

www.comic-con.org

Fax: (619) 414-1022, Comic-Con Hotline (619) 491-2475

CONTENTS

The Hot Sheet ........................................................................... 2
The Masquerade: Undressed ............................................... 4
An Amazing Spirit .................................................................... 6
The Coolest Goon Around ..................................................10
Fantastic Fans ..........................................................................12
Exhibit Hall Happenings ......................................................13
Sneak Preview .........................................................................12
What’s Happening Now? .....................................................14
It’s the Comic-Con Auction .................................................14
Walk of Fame ...........................................................................15
Celluloid Fantasy ....................................................................16
Under the Sails ........................................................................ 17
Gaming Gallery .......................................................................18
The Envelope Please . . .  ......................................................19
Titanic Topics ...........................................................................20
Fantastic Fans ..........................................................................21
A Chat with Cartoonist Greg Evans .................................23
The Power Pack ......................................................................25
Ex, X, & Y: Brian K. Vaughan Gets No Zzz’s ....................30
2005 Eisner Awards Judges Named ................................32
Register! ....................................................................................34
Multipurpose Form ...............................................................35
“Get a Room!” .........................................................................36
Hotel At-a-Glance Chart ......................................................37
Hotel Reservation Form .......................................................38
Fantastic Fans ..........................................................................40

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COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

Most fans can navigate the Information Super Highway, but with all the fandom-related sites out there, 
you could be missing some super-cool spots if you don’t know where to look. With that in mind, here are a 
dozen sites that might interest you.

I GO UGO

www.ugo.com

UGO stands for Under Ground Online, and the site covers every topic 
that’s entertainment related—fi lms, TV, sports, technology, games, 
and more. Click their comics link for interviews, news, previews, mes-
sage boards, and everything to keep you updated on what titles are 
alive, dead, or being brought back in the near future.

“EXTRA! EXTRA!”

www.superherotimes.com

Toy and action fi gure enthusiasts should defi nitely check out Super 

Hero Times, especially if favorite items come from comic books. On this 

site you’ll fi nd the latest news, photos, and forums about what’s hap-

pening in the world of toys.

USE THE FORCE

www.theforce.net/fanfi lms

TheForce.net is known as a great Star Wars fan site, but if you haven’t 
checked out the fan fi lms page, you’ve missed out. You’ll fi nd teasers, 
trailers, and other fun stuff .

READY FOR A CLOSE-UP

www.comics2fi lm.com

Fans are always excited to see 

their favorite characters come to 

life, and Comics2Film is a hot spot for information on that topic. The 

site also spotlights some neat fan fi lms that are worth checking out.

TATTLE TALE

www.tvtattle.com

 

TV Tattle combs the online press 
for current pop culture television items. From 

Survivor

 to 

Alias

Small-

ville

 to 

ER

, TV Tattle off ers a summary of the larger article and a links to 

the originating websites.

CALLING ALL HEROES!

www.superherohype.com

If you’re looking for heroes on 

TV or fi lm, as toys or video games, or if you just like everything in 

between, Super Hero Hype has all the latest news. The site off ers exclu-

sive interviews and reviews, plus links to the various online pop culture 

channels. You could lose a whole day exploring this site!

THE HOT SHEET

W E B

*

S L I N G E R S

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COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

THAT ROCKS! THAT STINKS!

www.rottentomatoes.com

Don’t like your local movie reviewer? Want to see what others have 
to say about a new fi lm and don’t have time to Google it? Rotten 
Tomatoes collects reviews from across the United States, giving good 
reviews a “Fresh” ranking and bad reviews a “Rotten” one. A quick 
glance at the Tomatometer will let you know where the overwhelming 
opinion stands. Links also allow you to read individual interviews and 
movie news highlights, making this a great time-saving device.

WHO’S WHO

www.DCUGuide.com

Titled the Unoffi  cial Guide to the DC Universe, this Internet encyclope-

dia covers the entire DCU in a way that only a fan site could possibly 

manage, because of the amount of anal-retention required to put such 

a project together. It includes every major character, location, and 

event as well as issue-by-issue indexes, character chronologies and 

more. While not offi  cially endorsed by DC or Warner Bros., this site is 

insane fun if you want to geek out on your DC trivia.

MARVELOUSLY GOOD

www.comicboards.com/marvelguide

Marvel Comics published its guide to the Marvel Universe in the early 
1990s, and fans have since started the Unoffi  cial Handbook of the 
Marvel Universe. This is an easy to navigate, basic site, so if you’ve ever 
wondered how Rachel Grey, Jean Grey, Scott Summers, Cable, and The 
Phoenix all relate—or any other pressing continuity question—you 
can get your basic facts here. 

GO FIGURE!

www.action-fi gure.com

For news and reviews around the world, Action-Figure.com is a great 

place to visit. Tons of news, info on toy-related conventions and events, 

previews of upcoming releases, fan forums, and even links to eBay toy 

auctions. Go ahead, play around.

FUN TIMES

www.homestarrunner.com

Tune in here for some of the 
coolest cartoons and games you’ve ever seen. You can hang out with 
Homestar Runner, Coach Z, Pom Pom, Strong Mad, Strong Sad, and 
more of these crazy cats. 

ONE SCOOP OR TWO?

www.aintitcoolnews.com

For fans who want the inside scoop on what’s cool, few sites deliver 

better than Ain’t It Cool News. This website covers tons of news and 

gossip, with contributors checking out various scripts in production, 

sneaking into test screenings, and hearing tasty tidbits from industry 

insiders. The info isn’t always 100% accurate, but it’s still a lot of fun..

Got a favorite website? Let us know. Send referrals to 

cci-info@comic-con.org

, please put “Update Sugges-

tions” in the subject line of your e-mail. Keep in mind, all suggestions must be family friendly and relate to 
comics or pop culture.

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COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

The Comic-Con Masquerade is more than just a fashion show where contestants parade on stage, do a quick 
twirl, and exit with little or no fanfare. Here the show is as much about the presentation as it is the costume, 
and with over 5,000 people watching, contestants can either fly high or crash and burn in a matter of sec-
onds if they’re not properly prepared. So we asked Jeanne Clason, Comic-Con’s Masquerade workmanship 
judge for over five years, to offer some hints that will help potential contestants. 

THE MASQUERADE:

COMIC-CON’S  WORKMANSHIP  JUDGE  OFFERS  SECRETS  FOR  SUCCESS

UNDRESSED

1. Read the rules

: If you go to the Masquerade link on the Comic-Con website 

(

www.comic-con.org

) you’ll find a full list of rules so you’ll understand what’s in-

volved and can properly prepare yourself for the night.

2. Know your audience

: Comic-Con has a highly opinionated audiences, and they will 

heckle you in a second if you’re not doing well. That’s why it’s important to really 

have your whole act down before going on stage.

3. Know your judges: 

Each judge brings personal expertise to the panel. For 

example, past judges Dragon Dronet and Wanda Piety are professionals mak-

ing props and sets for TV shows, so they notice details on a robot or gun 

that I may not have experience with. Diane Duncan has been a dancer 

on Broadway and she’s able to view the presentation differently be-
cause of her history in theater. I have experience in historical costuming, 

and I’m able to go backstage and actually look at the costumes up close 

before the presentation. That gives me information which I share with 

the other judges. So there’s definitely a judge covering ever aspect of 
the contest.

4. Turn around: 

Look at yourself in the mirror from the back. Some-

times people get everything looking good from the front but don’t 
know that something looks funny or ridiculous from the back.

5. Be confident: 

A person may have a beautifully made costume 

but will walk across the back of the stage really fast and leave. Let 

us see you. The people who come off best have done martial arts 

competitions, been in drama, or done something where they’re 

learned to be comfortable on stage. I’ve seen costumes backstage 

and thought, “Eh, it’s about a 5” [points out of a possible 10]. Then I 

see what they do on stage and their presentation is really funny, well 
acted, inventive, interesting or different, and that will bring them up 
to a 7 or 8. 

6. Don’t cut corners: 

Whether it’s a spandex costume, a dress, or 

jumpsuit, it’s got to be sewn decently. If you have threads hanging 
off, puckered seams, or it doesn’t come near to fitting the per-

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son—like a spandex suit that in the comic is 
skin tight and on stage is baggy or made 
for a person that’s 4 inches taller—then 
that’s bad. Also, the Masquerade provides 
rehearsal space. Take advantage of that, 
rehearse a lot, and really be prepared.

7. But what if you love sewing and either don’t 
have the body to wear the costume you want 
to make, or suffer from terrible stage fright?

 

A lot of costumers get someone else to do the 
presentation; that way they can sew what they 
want, have it look great, and place it on someone 
who does well in front of a large audience.

While Clason and the other judges select the trophy winners—that 
is, the best costume for each specific category—cash and merchan-
dise prizes are also awarded by comic book companies and local 
businesses that make their own decisions. Be aware that new 
contestants don’t always realize they’re competing against 
really obsessive costumers who have sometimes spent years 
on their entries, so expecting to win on your first time out is 
risky. 

That said, you can improve your experience by simply 
enjoying yourself. Look at what everybody else is wear-

ing, meet them, and see who wins and what they 
created. “That’s how people learn and do better in 
the future,” says Clason. The bottom line to compet-
ing is just having fun, because this is a wonderful 
experience that’s unique every year, and from the 
applause of the audience to the praises from judges 
and fellow costumers, it’s worth every minute.

For more information on entering the Masquerade, 
fill out the Multipurpose Form on page 35, fill in the 
appropriate box and return it to us via fax or mail, or 
visit 

www.comic-con.org

.

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By Richard Andreoli

Will Eisner, one of the most infl uential comics and 
graphic novel writers and artists, died on January 3 
due to complications from quadruple heart bypass 
surgery; he was 87.

Eisner began working in the comics industry at its 
inception and left an indelible mark because, from 
the very beginning, “Will thought comics was a 
medium and art form unto itself,” explains long-
time friend and Eisner Awards Administrator Jackie 
Estrada. “The great majority of guys working in com-
ics back then wouldn’t even tell people what they 
did for a living because they were ashamed of it. But 
Will loved comics, and that infused the work he did.”

Born in 1917 to Jewish immigrant parents, Eis-
ner started working professionally while still a 

teenager. He soon partnered 

with Jerry Iger to form the 

Eisner-Iger Studio in 1936, 

which provided completed 
comics to publishers. The 
demand for product was so 

great that the company 

hired on a staff  

that included 

such future 

greats as 

Jack Kirby 

(

Captain 

America,

 

The Fan-

tastic 

Four

and 

Bob 
Kane 

(

Bat-

man

) among others and created such lasting 

characters as 

Sheena, Queen of the Jungle

Dollman, 

and 

Blackhawk.

 But in 1939 Eisner sold his portion 

of the business to Iger to pursue his own projects. 
The result was 
a 16-page 
supplement 
syndicated in 
newspapers 
nationwide. 
It was within 
these pages 
that Eisner cre-
ated his most 
famous charac-
ter, The Spirit. 
And it was a 
character he 
owned himself.

“What separated 

The Spirit

 from every other comic 

was Eisner’s incredible storytelling sense,”

 

observes 

Gary Sassaman, director of programming for Comic-
Con International. In this cross between a super-
hero and pulp fi ction series, The Spirit is Denny 
Colt, a former detective (whom everyone thinks is 
dead) who disguises himself with only a mask and 
gloves—a sharp contrast to the spandex-wearing 
heroes of the era. Eisner’s fl awless blend of action, 
humor, and tragically realistic stories, as well as his 
willingness to break the traditional comic book grid 
format in order to best convey a particular story, 
created an adult sensibility that 

The Spirit 

fans loved. 

As Sassaman says, “It all added up to the defi nitive 
movie on paper, and the amazing thing is Eisner did 
it each and every week for years.”

The Spirit lasted from 1940 until 1952. After the 
series’ demise Eisner continued using his artistic and 
sequential storytelling skills to create educational 
manuals and commercial artwork for the United 
States Army, schools, and major corporations. He 

AN AMAZING SPIRIT

COMIC  BOOK  INDUSTRY  GIANT  WILL  EISNER,  1917–2005

Will Eisner

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COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

later became a teacher at the School of Visual Arts 
in New York, where he mentored another genera-
tion of comic talent. “He didn’t teach how to draw,” 
says Estrada, whose husband, comics creator Batton 
Lash, was one of Eisner’s students. “He taught the 

concept that comics are not just a sequence of illus-
trations, it’s a special form of graphic storytelling.” 

Like all good heroes The Spirit couldn’t stay down 
forever, and with renewed interest in the character, 

Will Eisner talks with comics great Gil Kane at Comic-Con in 1975.

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COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

particularly through reprints from Denis Kitchen’s 
Kitchen Sink Press, Eisner slowly returned to the 
industry. In 1978 he began a whole new career 
with the publication of 

A Contract With God

, a 

graphic novel that contained four slice-of-life 
morality tales set in a 1930s Bronx tenement. This 
work was an inspiration for future writers and art-
ists to create their own graphic novels, including 
Frank Miller with

 Batman: The Dark Night Returns

and Art Spiegelman, with the Pulitzer Prize–win-
ning graphic novel 

Maus: A Survivor’s Tale

Another Pulitzer Prize winner, Michael Chabon, 
based many aspects of  protagonist Joe Kavalier 
in his novel 

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & 

Clay

 on Eisner. 

Not one to rest on his laurels, Eisner continued 
producing graphic novels, including 

To the Heart of 

the Storm, Family Matter, The Dreamer, The Name of 
the Game,

 and 

Dropsie Avenue.

 His latest, 

The Plot,

 

will be published by W. W. Norton in May.

 

Eisner 

also wrote two “bibles” on creating comics: 

Graphic 

Storytelling

 and 

Comics and Sequential Art,

 which he 

self-published.

Further establishing Eisner’s role as a comics 
pioneer was the creation of the Will Eisner Comic 
Industry Awards in 1988, which are regarded as the 
highest honors for comics creators. In 1990 Eisner 
approached Comic-Con International to host the an-

nual event, and he soon became a regular presence 
during the ceremony. 

“Will was thrilled with the awards,” says Estrada. “He 
was like a kid up on the stage, wanting me to hand 
him each trophy before the winner was announced 
so he could see the name on it. And if it was some-
one he knew or a book he liked, he’d nod and smile.” 

Eisner approached Comic-Con in 1992 with a pro-
posal for an award that would specifi cally acknowl-
edge retailers who supported a wide variety of 
comics. “Will wanted to honor retailers who were 
willing to take a chance on a comic because it’s 
good and not just because it was published by one 
company or another,” says Fae Desmond, executive 
director of Comic-Con. In 1993 the fi rst Will Eisner 
Spirit of Comics Retailer Award was handed out at 
the then-trade show Comic Book Expo. As Desmond 
points out, “No other creator has reached out to 
retailers to this extent. Will recognized that retailing 
is a very important part of the industry, and I think 
there are still people who haven’t caught on to that 
fact. Will was always at the forefront of whatever he 
did, throughout his entire life.”

Until his death, Eisner remained an active partici-
pant at Comic-Con. Every year he spoke on several 
panels and appeared at booths for signings, and 
each year he would stand throughout the entire 

Eisner hands Neil Gaiman the Eisner Award for Best Anthology at the 2004 Comic-Con.

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COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

Even at age 87, Will Eisner was one of the most 
prolifi c talents in the comics industry. Upcom-
ing projects and retrospectives include:

• 

The Will Eisner Companion

 by Christopher 

Couch and Steven Weiner (DC Comics). This 
comprehensive, critical overview of Eisner’s 
work was just released in November 2004.

• 

The Plot:  The Secret Story of The Protocols of 

the Elders of Zion

 by Will Eisner  (W.W. Norton & 

Company, May 2005). Eisner’s last completed 
work, 

THE PLOT

 exposes the real-life twisted 

history behind a 100-year-old anti-Semitic 
document. Eisner agent Denis Kitchen ex-
plains, “By setting the record straight, Eisner 
hoped he could raise public consciousness 
of anti-Semitism throughout the world and 
draw attention to the nefarious ways in which 
governments use propaganda to infl uence 
public opinion.”

ˆ• The Spirit Archives

 (DC Comics). These high-

quality, hardbound editions reprint stories 
published in 1940 through 1952. the series is 
currently up to volume 15 (out of 24).

SITES TO CONSULT

The Offi cial Will Eisner Website

www.willeisner.com

Denis Kitchen Art Agency

www.deniskitchenartagency.com

Eisner’s representatives, with all the latest news 
on Eisner-related books and merchandise.

Condolences

http://willeisner.tripod.com/condolences/

Fans and colleagues from around the world 
share their thoughts and feelings.

The Comics Reporter

www.comicsreporter.com

The “Commentary” section of Tom Spurgeon’s 
website includes links to numerous articles, 
features, and blogs about Eisner’s impact on the 
comics community.

• 

Eisner/Miller: One on One

 (Dark Horse Comics, 

April 2005). Heavily illustrated and featuring 
rare photos, 

Eisner/Miller

 prints a fascinating 

dialogue between Eisner and 

Sin City

 creator 

Frank Miller.

• 

The Will Eisner Library

 (W.W. Norton & Com-

pany, November 2005). A re-issuing of 14 
graphic novels, beginning with 

The Contract 

With God Trilogy

, featuring new art and com-

mentary by Eisner.

• 

Will Eisner: A Spirited Life 

by Bob Andelman 

(Dark Horse Comics, Summer 2005). The 
authorized biography of Will Eisner. 

• 

The Will Eisner Retrospective

. This career-

spanning art exhibit opens at the Museum of 
Comic and Cartoon Art in New York City this 
May and will be followed by gallery shows at 
Brigham Young University in Provo, UT, The 
University of Massachusetts in Amherst, and 
possibly more.

Eisner Awards ceremony—even when Jeff  Smith 
and Kurt Busiek surprised him by running onto the 
stage with a beautiful red throne. “He sat down for 
about 30 seconds,” says Estrada, “and then it stayed 
empty for the rest of the evening!” Professionals 
who shared the stage with Eisner say that receiving 
their Eisner trophy was nice, but meeting Eisner and 
shaking his hand was the real award. 

Although Eisner’s work will remain with us forever, 
Sassaman sums up many fans’ feelings when he says, 
“I’ve gotten each and every one of 

The Spirit Archives

 

and look forward to the rest of the run, but somehow 
without Will around with the added promise of new 
stories, they seem a bit less enjoyable.”

Estrada concurs, saying, “He had a great intellect, 
was very sharp, and he was just a nice, thoughtful, 
and funny person. The kind of person we should all 
strive to become.”

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COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

AROUND

THE COOLEST

GOON

© 2005 Eric Powell

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COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

For Eric Powell, life as a comics creator wasn’t evolving as he’d envisioned. 

Sure, he’d had some gigs with various independent publishers and a 

couple of jobs at Marvel, and he’d put in a stint on Dark Horse’s 

Buff y 

The Vampire Slayer,

 

Angel,

 and 

Star Wars Tales

 adaptations, but his work-

load had slowly begun to fi zzle out. “It wasn’t very good,” Powell admits 

without any sense of self-pity. “It came down to the point where I knew 

I should try and do my own thing or I should just quit and fi nd another 
career.” Fortunately, Powell not only pursued this last venture, he found 

a vehicle that really allowed his talent to shine: 

The Goon.

The Goon

 is a darkly comedic, laugh-out-loud, action-packed romp 

through the streets of a town infested with zombies, where an insane 

priest is building an army of the undead, and only one man can put them 
in their place: the Goon. This is not your traditional superhero comic, and 

Powell himself doesn’t know what genre it exactly fi ts into, which contrib-

uted to some of his diffi  culty in selling the book. 

“I’d shopped it around pretty much everywhere and nobody wanted it,” 

Powell laughs. “I don’t think anyone quite understood it, because it’s very 

hard to explain. It’s not a concept book. So I took out a loan, put 

The Goon

 

out there, and it just took off , luckily for me.”

With Powell’s idea fi nally brought to light, audiences immediately gravitated toward 

The Goon

’s retro 

storylines because they were executed in an innovatively quirky fashion, and editors who’d once rejected 
the series fi nally understood what Powell was trying to convey; indeed, Powell’s former editor at Dark Horse 
called him one day to say that everyone on staff  was buying 

The Goon

 and really enjoying his work. Online 

and print articles began talking about the series as well, and 

The Goon

 was soon picked up by Dark Horse as 

a bimonthly series.

Since then, 

The Goon 

has taken off , with even 

Entertainment Weekly

 placing it on their Must-Have list. And 

while all this attention has been a welcome change, 
Powell says, “Like an actor wants to win an Academy 
Award, I really wanted to win an Eisner because 
Will Eisner was such a big infl uence on me. There 
are other awards out there, but to me, Eisner was a 
big thing because I’d followed his work so much.” 
Powell’s dream did come true, because 

The Goon

 

was nominated in not one, but four categories in the 
2004 Eisner Awards. And at the Awards ceremony 
Powell took home the Eisner for Best Single Issue.

Powell has more to say about his award-winning 
series, but he’s saving it for this year’s Comic-Con. 
Meanwhile, in April fans will be treated to Powell’s 
latest comic, 

Billy The Kid’s Old Timey Oddities

. Drawn 

by Kyle Hotz, “It’s a quirky pulp adventure where we 
fi nd out that Billy the Kid was not killed by Pat Gar-
rett, he was actually in hiding,” Powell explains. And 
just as he had trouble describing 

The Goon

, he says 

that in this comic, “Billy hooks up with this traveling 
freak show and they go on a treasure hunt.” He sighs 
at his own description and then simply adds, “It’s 
going to be a lot of fun.” 

And of that, we have no doubt.

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COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

HEY CATS, GIVE US THE WHO, WHERE AND WHY 
YOU’RE HERE.

REAGAN LODGE 

(Pala, CA): I’m just scouring the 

place for concept art books and to talk to as many 
pros as possible and find out how to get into the 
comics industry.

RACHEL UPTON 

(Baton Rouge, LA): I’m here to 

meet people, hang out with my best friends, buy 
comic books, and talk to pros. Basically the same 
reason. I’m interested in comic books and possibly 
breaking into the business if I can. As a writer. My art 
sucks.

AYSHA SHEHIM 

(Los Angeles, CA): I’m here to buy 

markers. 

 WHAT?

 

(

The group laughs.

)  Yeah, I want 

some Japanese art markers that are really hard to 
find but they’re amazing. We’re [also] here to meet 
a lot of people we know from online, and we’re all 
gathering now to meet for the first time.

MATT RHODES: 

We’re all friends from way back, 

and this was our one chance to get together and 
meet each other in person. That was my big thing. 
I’m all the way up from Alberta, Canada. Wolver-
ine land.  I just came here to meet my peers, the 
people I’ve grown up with artistically. But now I’ve 
been meeting some pros that I didn’t think I’d get 
a chance to, so that’s been good. Mike Mignola actu-
ally drew a sketch in my sketchbook and I’ve been 
screaming like a little girl! I was so excited. That’s 
been the biggest thing for me so far.

FANTASTIC FANS

ATTENDEES  FROM  THE  2004  COMIC-CON  SPEAK  OUT!

WHO:

 Andy Acosta, his mom Cathy, and Andy’s 

silent sister on right.

FROM:

 La Mirada, CA

SO, HOW DO YOU LIKE YOUR FIRST SHOW?

 

ANDY

: It’s cool because you can get autographs of 

people, like Stan Lee, and they’ve got most of the 
stuff that we like here.

CATHY:

 Actually, I came to my first Comic-Con a 

while ago and a friend brought me. I had no idea 
that it was anything like this. The toys, the artwork, 
it’s overwhelming. And meeting the artists is great.  
But one of the first reasons we came here was to 
meet Kevin Smith because we’re big Kevin Smith 
fans. 

AND AFTER THAT YOU WERE HOOKED!

CATHY

: That’s right!

WHO’S YOUR FAVORITE SUPER HERO?

ANDY

: Silver Surfer. 

FAVORITE TV SHOW?

CATHY

:  Adult Swim. I like the animation, any kind 

of animation, including the anime. 

ANDY

Tru Calling

 on FOX. That’s why I’m here be-

cause Eliza Dushku is signing.

BEST PURCHASE OF THE WEEKEND?

ANDY

: These wooden practice samurai swords.

WITH YOUR MOM’S PERMISSION, RIGHT?

CATHY

: Of course.

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The Exhibit Hall at Comic-Con is huge—in 2004 it was expanded to 460,000 square feet of exhibitor 
space. This year the show is going to be just as impressive, with well over 1,000 individual exhibitors 
including such comic industry heavyweights as DC, Dark Horse, and Image, as well as top indepen-
dent and self-published comics companies and the largest Small Press Area and Artists’ Alley of any 
convention. That means fans have an exclusive opportunity to meet more of their favorite creators in 
just one amazing location.

As for you shoppers out there, exhibitors offer everything from comics and graphic novels to Japa-
nese manga and anime, movie posters and memorabilia, clothing and jewelry, toys, action figures, 
statues, trading cards, video games, DVDs, and more. If you’re searching for something special in the 
realm of pop culture, chances are good that you’ll get a lead on it here.

EXHIBIT HALL HAPPENINGS

Once again, Comic-Con’s much antici-
pated Preview Night will be open only 
to pre-registered 4-day members and 
industry professionals on Wednesday 
July 13th.  This sneak peek allows you 
to explore the entire Exhibit Hall, gives 
you first dibs on those hard-to-find items 
before the rest of the public, and scores 
you a 2005 Events Guide early so you 
can plan your whole weekend in ad-
vance. Remember, there will be no on-
site registration available during Preview 
Night, so if you want to ensure being 
there, turn to page 35 for more info.

PRE-REG PRIORITY! Fans score deals on classic comic 
books during Wednesday’s Preview Night.

SNEAK PREVIEW

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COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

Comic-Con International is a nonstop party. From exploring the 
awesome Exhibit Hall to discovering the newest, hottest, most ex-
citing news from the comics industry and Hollywood elite, Comic-
Con attendees always have something to do during this four-day 
extravaganza. In 2005 the programming slate will be even more 
vast than in years past, with close to 300 special events filling 
up the San Diego Convention Center and encompassing almost 
every aspect of pop culture.

THE COMICS CRAZE

Comic-Con is all about creating an awareness of and appreciation 
for comic books, so programming focuses heavily on those topics, 
beginning with spotlights on all of the 2005 special guests. Par-
ticipation from major companies such as DC, Marvel, Dark Horse, 
and Image are a must, and you can be sure that editors and cre-
ative types will be back dishing out the inside news on current and 
upcoming projects. Viz, TOKYOPOP, and other manga publishers 
will also be on hand, and numerous panels on alternative, small 
press, and self-published comics are also in the works.

Diving into the scholarly side is the Comic Arts Conference, which 
in its 13th big year is the leading academic conference focused 
on the comics medium; the presentations and panels are sure to 
stimulate and educate. And speaking of education, the success of 
last year’s “How To” seminars has inspired Comic-Con’s program-
ming staff to devote space to panels on writing for comics, novels, 
TV shows, and movies; on illustrating and coloring comics; on 
self-publishing your own work; and on business-related topics, 
such as legal issues and marketing your own product. 

Finally, Comic-Con’s comics programming wouldn’t be complete 
without saluting the Golden and Silver Ages, so plenty of classic 
creators will be on hand to talk about their history in the business, 
including Murphy Anderson, Gene Colan, Bob Bolling, Dexter Tay-
lor, and more. And if comics aren’t the only reason you attend the 
show, turn the page, because there’s more in store for 2005.

IT’S A SHOW!
IT’S AN EXHIBIT!
IT’S A GREAT CAUSE!

IT’S THE 
COMIC-CON 
ART AUCTION

Comic-Con’s annual Art 
Auction features works by 
some of the leading comic 
and sf/fantasy artists work-
ing in the industry today. 
Throughout the weekend, 
attendees can watch their 
favorite artists drawing 
or painting magnificent 
creations right before their 
eyes in the Exhibit Hall. Most 
of these stunning pieces 
are then auctioned to the 
public on Sunday, with the 
proceeds benefiting numer-
ous programs for attendees 
with special needs, such as 
wheelchairs for navigating 
the show or sign language 
interpreters for the hearing 
impaired. From the artists 
giving their time to the 
fans purchasing artwork, 
these generous donations 
allow Comic-Con to offer 
programs and events to 
many attendees who would 
otherwise be unable to fully 
participate in the weekend. 
Not only is the Art Auction a 
good time, it’s a good cause, 
and your participation is 
greatly appreciated.

WHAT’S HAPPENING NOW?

C O M I C - C O N ’ S   P R O G R A M M I N G  

PA C K S   A   P U N C H   I N   2 0 0 5

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COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

Comic-Con has long been considered the must-attend event for Hollywood studios looking to preview new 
movies and television shows. The 2004 event stunned attendees with powerhouse panels on such mov-
ies as 

Batman Begins

Constantine, Elektra, The Incredibles, The Grudge, Sin City,

 and more. This programming 

brought to America’s Finest City such actors as Keanu Reeves, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Ryan Reynolds, Jessica 
Biel, Rosario Dawson, Jaime King, Jessica Alba, Jude Law, Bai Ling, Michael Chiklis, and Giovanni Ribisi, along 
with multiple directors and producers who have been wowing fans for years. 

Star Wars

 was also huge, with 

Carrie Fisher and Hayden Christensen making an appearance and Lucasfilm officially announcing the title 
for 

Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith.

 Needless to say, the gigantic Hall H was always filled with eager 

fans, and 2005 will be no exception, as numerous top-secret presentations are already in the works.

TV fans experienced many treats at the 2004 Comic-Con. 

Lost

 made a splash with fans as stars Matthew Fox, 

Evangeline Lilly, and Dominic Monaghan discussed the show that would go on to become one of ABC’s 
hottest hits for this season. Meanwhile, SCI FI Channel had a huge presence with the casts and crews for 
St

argate: SG-1, Stargate: Atlantis,

 

Battlestar Galactica,

 and 

Farscape

. From the WB, 

Smallville

 producers Miles 

Millar, Al Gough, and Jeph Loeb and actors John Glover, Allison Mack, and Erica Durance (the new Lois Lane) 
met fans and signed autographs. 

U.S. animation was super hot at Comic-Con 2004, with Disney bringing in creator Gary Baseman for 

Teacher’s 

Pet

, while ABC Family Channel previewed its new series 

Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce Go

! Cartoon 

Network introduced 

Foster’s Home for Imaginary Friends

The Life and Times of Juniper Lee

 and discussed 

Megas XLR

. Cartoon Network representatives also devoted two panels to the popular 

Adult Swim

 series, 

WALK OF FAME

HOLLY WOOD  RE TURNS  TO  SAN  DIEGO  IN  2005

 LOST

 IS FOUND: Evangeline Lilly, Dominic Monaghan, and Matthew Fox wowed fans with a preview of their 

ABC hit series, 

Lost

.

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COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

including how to pitch your own story ideas to 

Adult Swim

. Warner Bros. Animation offered sneak peeks at 

their upcoming seasons of 

Justice League Unlimited, Teen Titans

, and the new 

Batman

 animated series. Nick-

elodeon previewed 

Avatar

 and offered a panel with Butch Hartman, creator of 

Danny Phantom

 and 

Fairly 

Oddparents

. Finally, Comedy Central introduced its animated “reality” series 

Drawn Together

, which also 

became a huge hit in 2005.

Appearing at Comic-Con allows studios and networks to connect with thousands of fans, which is why Hol-
lywood is already vying for space in 2005. So sit back and strap yourselves in, because 2005 is going to be 
one heck of a ride!

Angling for anime? Movie marathons a must? Comic-Con International has your ticket for all the fun 
away from the sun.

AMAZING ANIME 

From classics like 

Urusei Yatsura

 and 

Dirty Pair

 to more recent hits like 

Gundam

Inu Yasha

, and ADV 

Films’ 

Lady Death: The Motion Picture

, Comic-Con’s anime schedule is always huge. The 2005 show is 

slated to be just as vibrant, with three full-time rooms—open from the beginning of the day until late 
into the evening—devoted to screenings of all your favorites from Japan. 

FANTASTIC FILMS

Over the years, Comic-Con has been noted among film buffs for its fantastic film rooms, where like-
minded souls gather in the dark to enjoy such cult favorites as 

Pink Floyd The Wall

 and 

Monty Python’s 

The Meaning of Life

 or to celebrate with screenings of recent big-screen releases such as 

Kill Bill, Find-

ing Nemo, 

and

 The Last Samurai.

 And while the films schedule at Comic-Con changed to nights-only 

in 2004, attendance was as 
fantastic as ever. 

In 2005 evening and night-
time screenings will be held 
in both the Manchester Grand 
Hyatt and the Convention 
Center. The films department 
is already working on another 
amazing schedule for 2005, 
and pre-registered 4-day 
membership holders will be 
able to get a sneak peek at 
the complete films schedule 
a couple weeks before the 
show. Everyone else will have 
to wait until they receive their 

Events Guide

 onsite. So you 

have another great reason 
to pre-register for the 2005 
Comic-Con!

Mobile Suit GUNDAM SEED 
TM  &  ©  2002-2005  SOTSU 
AGENCY/SUNRISE/MBS 
All Rights Reserved

CELLULOID FANTASY

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UNDER THE SAILS

A T   C O M I C - C O N   I N T E R N A T I O N A L

PORTFOLIO POTENTIAL

Since its inception, Comic-Con has become known 
as a major hot spot for companies seeking new tal-
ent and for aspiring professionals to make contacts. 
These days, the chief location for such happenings 
is at the Portfolio Review Area. Here, artists of all skill 
levels have their work examined by professionals 
and are given critiques or, in those truly wonderful 
instances, contact numbers for potential employ-
ment. 

Although some companies perform reviews at 
their exhibitor booths, during the 2004 show over 
20 companies were stationed at Comic-Con’s own 
Portfolio Review. These included comics companies 
such as Dark Horse, Committed Comics, Devil’s Due, 
Disney Publishing Worldwide, Tokyopop and Top 
Cow Productions, as well as gaming and entertain-
ment companies such as Wizards of the Coast, 
Sammy Studios, JMP Creative, and CinemaGraphics 
Entertainment, just to name a few.  

With such a stellar response, Comic-Con has again 
dedicated a large section of the Sails Pavilion for 
Portfolio Reviews in 2005. Sign-up sheets for these 
sessions quickly reached their limit,so Interested 
attendees should start working on their samples 
now. Just think, if 2005 bodes well, you just might 
become an attending professional by 2006.

ART SHOW STOPPERS

The annual Comic-Con Art Show is a wonderful 
opportunity for both professionals and talented 

newcomers to show off  their skills to an eager pub-
lic. The Art Show is located next to onsite registra-
tion, where the natural lighting provided by being 
in the Sails Pavilion off ers a wonderfully vibrant way 
for the 2D and 3D artwork to be displayed. Many of 
these pieces are also for sale, and attendees who 
are 18-years or older can bid. If you’re interested in 
participating in the 2005 event, please check the 
appropriate box on the Multipurpose Form on page 
35 or visit 

www.comic-con.org

.

AMAZING AUTOGRAPHS AREA

Fans love meeting their favorite creators and celeb-
rities at Comic-Con, and while signings happen all 
across the show, the Autograph Area always has the 
biggest names and the largest lines. From creators 
like Matt Groening (

The Simpsons

) and Brad Bird (

The 

Incredibles

), or actors from currents hits like 

Small-

ville

 and classic stars like Erin Grey (

Buck Rogers

and Marc Singer (

Beastmaste

r), over 75 profession-

als took time to meet their fans at the Comic-Con 
Autograph Area in 2004. Be sure to check the onsite 
Comic-Con Events Guide for the schedule of sign-
ings at the 2005 show. 

Beastmaster star, Marc Singer

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The Incredible Hulk just knocked Superman into 
orbit, but Wonder Woman is still holding her own 
against The Mighty Thor. No, this isn’t the latest 
Marvel/DC crossover—it was a heated battle in 
the gaming room at last year’s Comic-Con. And the 
company with the upper hand on this action was 
Upper Deck.

Upper Deck is a premier sports and entertainment 
publishing company that brought you such trading 
card games (TCG) as Yu-Gi-Oh, Marvel TCG, and DC 
Comics Origins. Originally, these latter two games 
only allowed one to play within those respective 
comic book universes; that is, the X-Men could fight 
Dr. Doom while the Justice League took on Lex 
Luthor, but the two could never mix it up. Then last 
year Upper Deck introduced the 

Vs. System

 through 

a huge push at Comic-Con, and fans were finally 
able to create their own cosmic clashes between 
these two titanic universes.

GAMING GALLERY

UPPER  DECK’S 

VS .  SYSTEM

  CR E ATES 

AC TION - PACKED  COMIC - CON  E VENT

SCHOOL’S IN: Gamers learn how to play 

Vs. System

 at Upper Deck’s booth inside the Exhibit Hall.

“Initially I collected the decks because of the art-
work, which is done by a lot of great comic artists,” 
explains Larry Lawrence, a lawyer from Los Ange-
les. “Then some friends taught me the game and I 
really got into it.” Creating his own teams was cool 
enough, but when the 

Vs. System

 was introduced, 

Lawrence and his friends played more often. “You 
can throw Batman in line with Cyclops and kick Dr. 
Octopus’ butt,” he says. “What comics fan doesn’t 
like being able to do that?”

The basic rules involve each player starting with 
50 endurance points, which represent the stay-
ing power of that player’s team. The object is to 
reduce your opponent’s endurance through a 
series of attacks, and numbers printed on the cards 
in your deck determine the power of those at-
tacks. Completing a successful strike reduces your 
competition’s endurance points, and whoever hits 
zero first, loses. While it sounds like all you need 

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COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

in order to win are Superman-style powerhouses, 
strategy is also key.

“There are like 20 different Superman cards, but only 
one of them is really powerful, plus you’re only al-
lowed four cards of one type in your deck,” explains 
Ted Viaselli, a development exec in Hollywood who 
plays in Lawrence’s group. “Because of the way the 
game works, you cycle through cards very quickly, 
so if you only have four cards of one type—say, 
four Supermans—once you run through them 
you’re screwed.” It’s important for players to build 
a balanced deck, because the recruitment of other 
heroes, villains, and equipment will assist in fighting 
your opponent. 

During a round, a player may draw a certain number 
of cards; when those are placed with other cards 
already in play, “they’re called ‘combos’ and give 
you a superior attack, says Lawrence. Couple those 
combos with some “plot twist” and “location” cards 
that can hinder your opponent’s ability to fight back, 
and even Howard The Duck could win. 

(Well, maybe not, but you get the idea.)

The popularity of TCG gaming is astounding, with 
numerous high-stakes competitions held every year. 
At the 2004 Comic-Con alone, over $10,000 in cash 
and prizes were awarded to gamers from various 
companies, including Upper Deck, Decipher Inc., 

The Comic-Con International Independent Film Festival is one of the fastest grow-
ing program tracks at the convention. Last year over 125 films were entered, and in 
2005 we’re upping the ante with the CCI-IFF becoming a juried event.  That means 
individual prizes will be awarded in each of these categories:
 
• Action/Adventure
• Animation
• Comics-oriented
• Documentary (limited to genre and pop culture topics)
• Horror/Suspense
• Humor/Parody 
• Science Fiction/Fantasy

Along with the change to a juried event there are also new rules, so visit www.comic-con.org/cci/
cci_iff.shtml for information and an official entry ballot. The submission deadline is May 1, 2005. Good 
luck—er, shooting—um, break a leg! (Ugh, you get the idea…)

Score Entertainment, and Wizards of the Coast. The 
2005 Comic-Con promises similar prizes, including 
a $10,000 

Vs. System

 tournament from Upper Deck, 

where the winner will be awarded $2,500 in cash, 
and the top 20 finishers will earn cash prizes ranging 
from $200 to $1,500. The top 10 players will also win 
invitations to the next $1 Million Pro Circuit Tourna-
ment for later this year, an exclusive 

Vs. System

 

product.

“We just play for fun,” says Viaselli. “But we’ve seen 
those tournaments at conventions and they can be 
intense.”

Of course, not everyone starts at pro levels, and 
the beauty of Comic-Con is that anyone attending 
the show can learn how to play. Whether you’re a 
parent wanting to spend time with your kids or a 
novice looking for a new hobby, company booths 
in the Exhibit Hall offer space to teach the basics. 
And of course gamers of all levels set up shop 
in the gaming rooms on the Mezzanine at the 
Convention Center and in the Manchester Grand 
Hyatt, making Comic-Con a hot spot for gamers 
every year.

For more information on gaming at Comic-Con, 
check out future issues of the Update or visit 

www.

comic-con.org

. The onsite Comic-Con Events Guide 

will provide information on tournaments, including 
times and locations.

THE ENVELOPE PLEASE . . .

THE CCI-INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL BECOMES A JURIED EVENT!

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TITANIC TOPICS

COMIC-CON ANNOUNCES SPECIAL THEMES FOR 2005

TITANIC TOPICS

Every year Comic-Con highlights major events and anniversaries from the comic book and pop culture 
universes as special themes for programming and the Souvenir Book. This year we’ve chosen a wide variety 
of topics to excite enthusiasts of all ages and backgrounds.

• Will Eisner: A Tribute

A comics legend and close friend of Comic-Con has left us, but his amazing spirit remains. Join fans and 
pros alike in a celebration of Will Eisner’s work as a creator, visionary, mentor, and champion of the comics 
medium.

• Little Archie’s 50th Anniversary

Archie’s younger self may not look a day over 12, but he’s been taking off  on amazing adventures for fi ve 
decades. This year Little Archie’s signature creators, Bob Bolling and Dexter Taylor, will appear at Comic-Con 
for the fi rst time to celebrate this popular character.

• Martian Manhunter’s 50th Anniversary

Question: Comics historians often credit J’onn J’onzz’s arrival on Earth as the beginning of the Silver Age, 
but with his morphing abilities how can one tell a Martian’s real age? Discuss.

• Krypto is 50! (or 350 in dog-years)

Yip, Yip! Believe it or not, the super-dog from Krypton has been a part of the Superman legend on and off  
for 50 years! Now where’s that pooper scooper?

• 25th Anniversary of the New Teen Titans

Those teenage superheroes are as popular as ever with the success of the Geoff  Johns–scripted comic book 
and a smash-hit Cartoon Network animated series. Special guests Marv Wolfman and George Pérez, who 
transformed the “Junior JLA” into a lasting phenomenon, join Comic-Con in celebration of the New Teen 
Titans turning 25.

• 10th Anniversary of Stray Bullets

With deeply layered characters and an unconventional, nonlinear style of storytelling, 

Stray Bullets

 has 

become known as one of the best crime comics ever created. David Lapham’s quirky noir series continues to 
amaze and astound audiences in its tenth big year, maintaining a strong presence in a market dominated by 
superheroes in tights. 

• 10th Anniversary of Johnny the Homicidal Maniac

Alhough Jhonen Vasquez created the popular 

Invader Zim

 cartoon for Nickelodeon, it was 

Johnny the Homi-

cidal Maniac

 that made Vasquez a household name, and that’s certainly reason to celebrate!

MAKING MEMORIES

Being a part of Comic-Con history is easier than you think with the 2005 Souvenir Book. Comic-Con wel-
comes articles and artwork based on our special themes to fi ll the book’s pages. So if anything on this list 
strikes your fancy, visit 

www.comic-con.org

 for complete details on how you can contribute.

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COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

FANTASTIC FANS

ATTENDEES  FROM  THE  2004  COMIC-CON  SPEAK  OUT!

LOVELY LADIES

Meet Becky Yanuck from Los Angeles, CA, Vicky 
Rudolph from Ventura, CA, and Brittney Hovsepian 
from far off  San Diego, CA.  They don’t know each 
other, but they started chatting while waiting in 
line for Eliza Dushku’s autograph under the Sails 
Pavilion.

WHAT GOT YOU INTO COMIC-CON?

BECKY

: My sister got me into this. She’s home in 

Connecticut and very sad. She just found out Keanu 
Reeves was here and called. I said, “I’m sorry, Sam, I 
got his autograph this morning.”

VICKY

: My daughter is the comic fanatic and she 

dragged me to Comic-Con. Then I started getting 
interested and enjoying it. I go down to Top Cow a 
lot, I like their stuff , and 

Star Wars

.

BRITNEY

Buff y the Vampire Slayer

! My boyfriend in-

troduced me to the Con and that’s when I saw they 
had Buff y [panels and merchandise] so that’s when I 
started coming.

WHAT’S THE BEST COSTUME YOU’VE SEEN?

BRITTNEY

: I saw this little kid dressed as Darth Maul 

and he pretty much looked exactly like the charac-

ter. He was tiny but he had the complete face paint, 
horns and everything. 

VICKY:

 My favorite was Jack Sparrow. 

BECKY

: I also liked Jack Sparrow but I also liked 

Sirius Black the Harry Potter Wizard.

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COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

WHO:

 Dave Lowery and his son, Charley.  Dave is a 

storyboard artist for movies and worked on the first 

Shrek

 film for Dreamworks, among other projects

FROM:

 Los Angeles, CA

WHAT’S HE HOLDING? 

That’s the Comic-Con Sou-

venir Book, and he’s showing off the artwork he sent 
in which was selected for publication.

HOW MANY YEARS COMING TO CON? 

10

IS THIS BOYS’ WEEKEND OUT? 

 No, his wife and 

daughter were on the Exhibit Hall floor shopping. 
He’s converted the entire family into Comic-Con 
attendees.

WHOSE WORK DOES HE LOVE? 

Don Martin of 

Mad

 

Magazine, Gustav Klimt and Alfons Mucha

WHAT STUNNING ITEM HAS HE SEEN FOR SALE 
IN PAST YEARS? 

A Frank Frazetta painting that was 

selling for around $750,000.

SO IS HE HERE FOR COMICS, OR ART?

 “Both. I’m a 

big fan of art in general, art history and the modern 
painters, illustrators old and new. Being an illus-
trator/commercial artist, a storyboard artist, I can 
admire that facility and that grace and beauty that 
all those old guys and new guys have.”

WHO ARE YOU LOOKING FORWARD TO SEEING?

VICKY

: I came to see Eliza, and I’m getting sketches 

from some of the Top Cow artists.  

BRITTNEY

: I came to see Eliza and I wanted to see 

the preview for the next 

Star Wars

 movie and then I 

wanted to check out the [Exhibitors].

BECKY

: (Suddenly bursting with excitement.) This 

morning, the highlight of my day was meeting [the 
actor who plays] Weiss from 

Alias

HE WAS HERE?

BECKY

:  Oh my God he was here!  Oh wait!  I’ve got 

to show you pictures. (There’s much scrambling 
for Becky’s digital camera.) Oh my God, he was the 
sweetest guy! He was fabulous. The guy who plays 
[Arvin] Sloane and [

Alias 

creator] J.J. Abrams were 

down in Inkworks Trading Cards promoting the 
third season. I can die happy, now!

Left to right, actor Ron Rifkin, Alias creator J.J. Abrams and actor Greg Grunberg at Comic-Con 2004.

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GREG

A CHAT WITH CARTOONIST

Adolescence can be the most diffi  cult and amusing 
period in one’s life, and no one is more aware of that 
fact than San Diego cartoonist Greg Evans. Since 
1985 he’s been entertaining millions of readers 
through the adventures of 

Luann,

 the comic strip 

about an awkward teenage girl who’s learning how 
to grow up in a confusing world. 
From sibling rivalry to fi rst-time 
crushes, Luann’s story is as touch-
ing as it is hilarious, and Evans’ 
consistent quality earned him 
the 2003 National Cartoonists 
Society’s (NCS) Reuben Award for 
Cartoonist of the Year. This March 
marks the syndicated strip’s 20th 
year in print, so it’s only fi tting 
that Evans be an invited guest at 
the 2005 Comic-Con. He took a 
moment to chat with us about his 
life with 

Luann

.

Comic-Con International: Was 

Luann 

your fi rst major success?

GREG EVANS: Yes. I submitted 
other strips over many years, but 
they were rotten. (he laughs) 
You know how it is when you’re 
young and think, 

Wow, this is 

great stuff 

. Then you look back 

on it and think, 

Oh my God, how 

did I have the guts to send this off ?

 

I’m a fi rm believer that you reach 
a certain maturity level where 
everything clicks, and if you 
fi nd the right expression of your 

talent then you’re ready to go. But before that time 
you’re sort of fl oundering, and you should really be 
in a gathering mode more than a production mode. 
I try to explain this to young cartoonists who want 
to get syndicated when they’re 18. You tend to have 
a very small worldview when you’re younger, so 

EVANS

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you end up doing comic strips that are about your 
little microscopic world and they tend to lack larger 
appeal.

CCI: So how did 

Luann 

come about?

GE: It was when my daughter came along. When she 
was a preteen, the family dynamics started having 
an eff ect on me, and that’s where I started to draw 
inspiration for 

Luann

. So it was coming from a real 

place and a heart, and I think that’s the secret to a 
successful comic strip.

CCI: How old is Luann, the character, now?

GE: I aged her to 16 about 5 years ago because I felt 
like I’d run through everything I could do with her 
at 13. I wanted her to drive, and she seemed older 
to me, so overnight she grew up, turned 16, and 
she’s been that age ever since. I imagine she’ll stay 
that way, because if I keep aging her, pretty soon I’ll 
be doing 

Cathy,

 and someone else is already doing 

that.

CCI: The strip has defi nitely evolved, too. 
Now it’s as much about her family as it is 
about Luann.

GE: Right. All the characters have 
developed over the years into more 
complex personalities, and so I try to 
tell diff erent stories. Early on it was 
just a gag-a-day strip, but fairly 
quickly I fell into writing story-
lines because it’s more interesting 
for me and it turns out that it’s 
more interesting for the read-
ers as well. Now I do these 

never-ending epic storylines that seem to go on and 
on. (he laughs)

CCI: Who were some of your early inspirations?

GE: Well, here’s a surprise answer: Charles Schulz. 
I grew up in Burbank, not too far from the Disney 
Studios, and like all little kids in the ‘50s, I loved the 
Disney characters. I wanted to work at Disney and 
bring Mickey Mouse to life, but I didn’t know how 
to follow that career course. Then I discovered 

Mad

 

magazine when I was a teen and wanted to be a 
part of that wacky crew, but I didn’t know how to 
do that, either. Then I discovered the comics page in 
the newspaper and thought doing a comic strip ex-
actly suited my temperament. I discovered 

Peanuts

 

and fell in love with that. What [Schulz] did seemed 
so simple and yet so complex. That was my major 
inspiration.

CCI: Did you ever meet him?

Yes, I met Sparky the fi rst year 

Luann

 came out. He 

was always very open to the new guys, and I went 

to a Newspaper Feature Council meeting and 

he invited me to sit with him at lunch. It 

was like sitting next to God. He was in 

Northern California and I’m in South-

ern California so we were able to visit 

from time to time, and over the years 

just built up a real nice relationship. I 
was very happy about that.

You can fi nd out more about Greg 

Evans at this year’s Comic-Con, or visit 

his website at 

www.luannsroom.com

.

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Just when you thought Comic-Con couldn’t top 
itself, this year’s show has added more A-list talent 
for fans of every genre. Check out this current list of 
confirmed guests; any names with asterisks (*) have 
been added since the last Update.

Forrest J Ackerman

Known for his love of all things fantastic and HOR-
ROR-endous puns, Forrest J Ackerman is one of 
fandom’s most beloved figures. He was an early 
literary agent for science fiction writers such as Ray 
Bradbury and was editor of the fondly remembered 

Famous Monsters of Filmland

, which was a source of 

inspiration to many filmmakers, including Joe Dante, 
Steven Spielberg, and George Lucas.

*Lee Ames

After working in animation in the 1930s, artist 
Lee Ames joined the Eisner-Iger Studio, where he 

SPECIAL GUESTS KEEP ROLLING IN FOR THE 2005 COMIC-CON

POWER

PACK

T H E

worked alongside Johnny Cassone (

Lightning

), 

Andre LeBlanc (

The Phantom

), Mort Leav, and 

numerous other comic book legends. In the 1940s 
his hand could be seen on Firebrand stories in 

Police 

Comics, 

as well as on Kid Patrol, Stuart Taylor, and 

Dusty Rhodes for Fiction House’s 

Flight Comics

. He 

also worked for Stan Lee at Timely (Marvel) Comics 
on 

Homer the Brave, Marvel Science Fiction

, and other 

titles; on 

The Chessmen

 with Burt Frohman and 

War 

Against Crime

 for EC Comics; and on 

The Kewpies

 

comic strip for Will Eisner.  He left comics in the mid-
1950s and eventually created the hugely successful 
Draw 50 series, beginning with 

Draw 50 Animals

 

(1974) for Doubleday. There are now 26 titles in the 
Draw 50 series that primarily use visual instructions, 
rather than text, to teach.

Murphy Anderson

Murphy Anderson’s skills as a penciller and inker 
made him one of the Silver Age’s most recognizable 
and favorite artists. He drew the 

Buck Rogers

 comic 

strip for newspapers, he pencilled and inked such 
books as 

The Spectre

 and 

Hawkman

 at DC, and his 

crisp inking added a lush veneer to the pencils on 
such series as 

Adam Strange

Flash, The Atom, Super-

man,

 and many others.

*David B.

French cartoonist David B. has been hailed by 

The 

Comics Journal

 as one of Europe’s most important 

and innovative comics artists. His internationally 
acclaimed graphic novel 

Epileptic

 is a stunning and 

emotionally resonant autobiography about growing 
up with an epileptic brother; with its recent U.S. re-
lease from Pantheon (a division of Random House), 
David B.’s following in the States is skyrocketing.

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Bob Bolling

Making his first appearance at Comic-Con, Bob 
Bolling is one of two writer/artists behind the clas-
sic 

Little Archie

 series, which will be celebrating its 

50th anniversary in 2005. 

Little Archie 

focuses on 

the highly imaginative childhood adventures of 
everyone’s favorite teens, and has built a huge cult 
following that continues thriving to this day. 

*Gene Colan 

Artist Gene Colan began his comics career in 1944 
drawing 

Wings Comics

 at Fiction House. He was soon 

hired by Stan Lee to illustrate for Timely (Marvel) 
Comics and has worked in the industry ever since. 
His art has graced the pages of such classic titles 
as 

Journey into Mystery

 at Marvel, 

Sea Devils

 and 

Hopalong Cassidy

 at DC, as well as on such popular 

characters as Batman, Captain America, Captain 
Marvel, Howard the Duck, Wonder Woman, and 
Sub-Mariner to name just a few. He is perhaps best 
known for his runs on 

Daredevil, Iron Man, 

and

 Tomb 

of Dracula.

Greg Evans

Winner of the National Cartoonists Society (NCS) 
Reuben Award for Cartoonist of the Year in 2003, 
local San Diego cartoonist Greg Evans created the 

Luann

 syndicated comic strip, which has run in 

newspapers since 1987. Evans recently sat down 
for chat with Comic-Con Update. You can find his 
interview on page 

23

.

*Ray Bradbury

The dean of American science fiction writers 
returns to Comic-Con as one of the show’s 
most beloved guests. Bradbury is the author 
of such classics as 

The Martian Chronicles

The 

Illustrated Man, Something Wicked This Way 
Comes

, and 

Fahrenheit 451

 (currently in its 

50th anniversary year), many of which are 
continually adapted into comic book and cin-
ematic form. In 2004, Avon Books published 
a collection of his short stories titled 

The Cat’s 

Pajamas

, as well as an immense volume of his 

best-remembered stories. He was given The 
National Book Award in 2001 for his contribu-
tion to American Literature, and President 
Bush awarded him The National Medal of Arts 
in 2004.

Mr. Bradbury, what are you currently 
reading?

Tender Is The Night

 by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Essay introductions

 

(introductions to his 

plays) by George Bernard Shaw

Slouching Towards Bethlehem

 by Joan Didion

*Juanjo Guarnido

Spanish-born Juanjo Guarnido is the artist and 
colorist behind 

Blacksad,

 a series of graphic novels 

featuring feline private detective John Blacksad. The 

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first volume of the U.S. edition of 

Blacksad

 earned 

three nominations in the 2004 Eisner Awards, 
including Best Painter. Before 

Blacksad,

 Guarnido 

worked on Spanish editions of Marvel comic books 
and as a layout artist for the Walt Disney studios in 
Paris. (Courtesy of iBooks)

Pia Guerra

After 10 years of struggling to break into the comics 
industry, penciller Pia Guerra became an “overnight” 
success with the critically acclaimed VERTIGO series, 

Y, The Last Man

. She’s appearing at the 2005 show 

with 

Y

 co-creator and fellow Comic-Con special 

guest, Brian K. Vaughan

.

Maria launched El Capitan Books to publish 
his award-winning self-published crime series 

Stray Bullets

, which is celebrating its 10th year 

in 2005. While continuing to write and draw 

Stray Bullets,

 he is also writing a 12-issue Bat-

man story arc for 

Detective Comics.

Mr. Lapham, what comics are you cur-
rently reading?

First, I’d just like to say, I don’t read.  From a 
very young age, comics rotted my brain and 
now all I do is eat Ho-Hos and watch reruns of 

Xena: Warrior Princess

.

But if I did read, my list might look like this:
1. E.C. Segar’s 

Popeye

.  Way ahead of its (or 

even our) time.  If I was stranded on a de-
serted island and could only have one comic...
2. 

Love and Rockets, Luba, Venus

—Anything 

Gilbert Hernandez puts out, I’m first in line.
3. Recently, I pulled out all my old Frank Miller 
and Alan Moore comics.  I was thirteen again.  
They reminded me of why I wanted to do this 
in the first place.

*Ray Harryhausen

The primary influence for a whole generation of 
filmmakers, Ray Harryhausen is the undisputed 
king of stop-motion animation. His memorable film 
works include 

Jason and the Argonauts, Clash of the 

Titans, 20,000,000 Miles to Earth, Sinbad’s Golden Voy-
age,

 and many more. 

*Jim Lee

Jim Lee exploded onto the comics scene in the mid 
1980s with his eye-catching, innovative artwork 
in 

X-Men

 and 

Uncanny X-Men

 at Marvel. He was 

David Lapham

Eisner award–winning writer/artist David 
Lapham began working in the comics 
industry at Valiant Comics, where he helped 
illustrate and create titles such as 

Shadow-

man

 and 

Harbinger

. In 1995 he and his wife 

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considered one of the industry’s Young Turks when 
he helped form Image Comics in 1992, and his 
WildStorm Productions Image imprint launched 
numerous successful titles, including 

Wild C.A.T.S.

Stormwatch

, and 

GEN

13

, among others. He later 

worked with Marvel during the revamp of Fan

tas-

tic Four, Iron Man, Avengers

 and 

Captain America

and then moved WildStorm to DC Comics. He is 
currently completing a run on 

Superman,

 and this 

summer he’s illustrating a new 

Batman

 series for the 

DC All-Stars line.

Scott McCloud

Scott McCloud first came onto the comics scene as 
the writer/artist of the 1980s series 

Zot!

 for Eclipse 

Comics. He went on to gain attention both within 
and outside the comics field with his groundbreak-
ing 

Understanding Comics

, a book in comics format 

in which he explored and explained comics as a 
valid art form. McCloud followed this book with 

Re-

inventing Comics,

 and his new book, 

Making Comics,

 

is being published in 2006. For the last several years 
he has been conducting seminars and has been a 
leading proponent of web-based comics.

Gary Panter

Illustrator, painter, and designer Gary Panter is 
probably best known for his work as head set 
designer on the 

Pee Wee’s Playhouse

 TV series, a job 

which earned him three Emmy Awards. His distinct 
artwork on album covers, most notably for Frank 
Zappa, earned him the title “King of Punk Art.” He’s 
also a well-known underground cartoonist, best 
known for his Jimbo character, most recently seen in 
the deluxe hardcover collection 

Jimbo in Purgatory,

 

published by Fantagraphics.

George Pérez

One of comics’ most beloved artists, George Pérez 
co-created 

The New Teen Titans

, which is celebrating 

its 25th year in 2005. Most recently, he was the artist 
for 2004’s wildly popular 

JLA/Avengers

 miniseries, 

the epic company crossover from DC and Marvel 
that fans had long dreamed of seeing. Currently, 
Pérez is working on a 

New Teen Titans

 graphic novel 

with writer Marv Wolfman, a project the two began 
in the 1980s.

Eric Powell

Writer and illustrator Eric Powell, is the creative mind 
behind 

The Goon

, published by Dark Horse Comics. 

To learn more about Eric and 

The Goon,

 turn to page 

10

 for an interview..

*J.J. Sedelmaier

Making his first appearance at a comics convention, 
J.J. Sedelmaier is co-founder of the cutting-edge 
animation studio that produced the pilot for 

Harvey 

Birdman, Attorney at Law, 

which helped initiate 

Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim block of cartoons. 
He has produced numerous TV show and commer-
cials, and through a partnership with Robert Smigel 
created 

Saturday TV Funhouse

 for NBC’s 

Saturday 

Night Live

, thus establishing such pop culture icons 

as “The X-Presidents,” and “The Ambiguously Gay 
Duo.” 

*Kevin Smith

Filmmaker, author, and comic book retailer Kevin 
Smith is no stranger to comics fans all over the 
world. From his success with such films as 

Clerks, 

Chasing Amy, 

and 

Dogma

 to his award-winning work 

on 

Daredevil 

and

 Spider-Man

 at Marvel and 

Green 

Arrow: Quiver 

at DC, Smith has shown a keen ability 

to meld current fan sensibilities with solid storytell-
ing techniques. 

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*J. Michael Straczynski

Best known as the creator/writer/executive pro-
ducer for 

Babylon 5

, J. Michael Straczynski currently 

writes 

The Amazing Spider-Man

The Fantastic Four, 

Supreme Power,

 and 

The Book of Lost Souls

 for Marvel 

Comics, as well as the maxiseries 

Silver Surfer: Re-

quiem

 and 

Dream Police

. His new radio drama series, 

The Adventures of Apocalypse Al

, debuts on the Cana-

dian Broadcasting Corporation this summer.

*Dave Stevens

Fan-favorite artist and creator of 

The Rocketeer

 Dave 

Stevens is known for his incredible attention to 
detail and design, as well as his wonderful render-
ings of women (particularly Bettie Page). His work, 
including portfolios and limited-edition prints, is 
highly sought after by collectors around the world. 

Dexter Taylor

Besides Bob Bolling, Dexter Taylor is the other artist 
associated most with the 

Little Archie

 series. This 

year marks both 

Little Archie’s 

50th anniversary

 

and 

Taylor’s first appearance at Comic-Con.

Michael Turner

One of the most popular writer/artists working in 
comics today, Michael Turner helped create and 
launch the 

Witchblade

 series for Top Cow in 1995. 

In 2002 he started his own publishing company, 
Aspen, which featured his hit creations 

Fathom 

and 

Soulfire

. He most recently completed his critically 

and commercially acclaimed run on DC’s 

Superman/

Batman

 series, which featured the return of the one 

true Supergirl.

Brian K. Vaughan

Currently writing 

Ultimate X-Men,

 the new Wild-

Storm hit 

Ex Machina

, and the Eisner Award–nomi-

nated VERTIGO series 

Y, The Last Man

,

 

Brian K. 

Vaughn took some time with Comic-Con Update to 
discuss his career. You can read about it on page 30.

*Jim Warren

Starting off as the publisher of 

Famous Monsters 

of Filmland

 in the late 1950s, Jim Warren jumped 

headfirst into the comics world in 1964 with the 
publication of 

Creepy.

 He began utilizing a stable 

of outstanding artists, essentially resurrecting the 
horror comics genre, and eventually went on to add 

Eerie

 and 

Vampirella 

to his line, as well as bringing 

Will Eisner’s 

The Spirit

 back into active publication. 

Marv Wolfman

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the 
beloved 

New Teen Titans

 comics series and the 

20th anniversary of 

Crisis on Infinite Earths

, the 

groundbreaking maxiseries that revamped 
the entire DC Universe. What do they have in 
common? Both were written by fan-turned-
pro Marv Wolfman. Wolfman has had a long 
and glorious career writing for both Marvel 
and DC; his credits include co-creating the 
character of Blade for Marvel while writing/
editing the 

Tomb of Dracula

 series.

Mr. Wolfman, what are you currently 
reading?

I just finished reading 

The Big Bad Wolf: A 

Novel

 by James Patterson

My Anecdotal Life

 by Carl Reiner

Men Of Tomorrow: Geeks, Gangsters, and the 
Birth of the Comic Book

 by Gerard Jones

A History of Israel

 by Howard M. Sachar as well 

as a dozen other history books on Israel for a 
graphic album I’m writing.

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EX,X,& Y

BRIAN K. VAUGHAN GETS NO ZZZ’S

STATS

WHAT:

 current writer, 

Y, The 

Last Man

 (Vertigo), 

Ex Machina

 

(WildStorm), 

Ultimate X-Men

 

(Marvel)

WRITING COMICS: 

since 1996

FIRST FULL WRITING AS-
SIGNMENT:

 

Kazar Annual,

 

1997 (Marvel)

FIRST SERIES WRITING 
ASSIGNMENT: 

Swamp Thing

 

(Vertigo)

CURRENTLY READING:

 

Michael Chabon’s 

The Final 

Solution: A Story of Detection,

 

Jonathan Lethem’s 

Men and 

Cartoons: Stories

, and anything 

by Alan Moore, Brian Michael 
Bendis, Garth Ennis, and War-
ren Ellis.

Comic-Con International: 
How did you get into writing 
comics?

Brian K. Vaughan:

 Marvel had 

started something called the 
Stanhattan Project— like the 
Manhattan Project but named 

after Stan Lee— [so they could fi nd and develop new talent.] I was a fi lm student at NYU, and two Marvel 
editors from the Stanhattan Project taught workshops on writing comics. They liked my stuff  and initially 
threw me some real small projects, like an issue of 

Wolverine

 where the writer who did the plot disappeared 

and they needed someone to write the dialogue over the art. But eventually I moved up.

CCI: What comics did you read as a child?

BKV:

 

Spider-Man, Hulk, Batman, Superman

—the big icons from both companies. I then moved over to 

Watchmen

 and started devouring whatever Alan Moore comics I could fi nd. Karen Berger, the editor-in-chief 

of Vertigo, hates when I say this but I was sort of weaned on Vertigo. Vertigo started when I was still in high 
school, so my formative years were spent reading early Vertigo, and I always wanted to do a Vertigo book.

CCI: And now here you are with 

Y, The Last Man

. How did that come about?

BKV: 

I’d been working on 

Swamp Thing

 for two years, and the series was about to get cancelled. Basically 

I’d just run one of the Vertigo franchises into the ground and I [thought], 

Well, that’s it for me

. To their credit 

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they were really nice and said, “We like your voice and perhaps you’re better suited for something that’s en-
tirely yours, so pitch us.” I’d wanted to do something that would raise the level of dialogue in comics about 
gender, so I picked a classic sci-fi  high-concept [What if all the male mammals on Earth were wiped out by a 
plague to which females were immune and only one man remained?] as a way to explore gender issues, and 
that’s where 

came from.

CCI: Can you tell us about the projects you’re working on and give a small teaser of what’s going to 
happen between now and this summer’s Comic-Con?

BKV: 

Ex Machina

 over at WildStorm, which I co-created with Tony Harris who used to draw 

Starman

, is a 

political thriller/superhero book. It’s about politics in the real world post 9-11, and people’s need for heroes 
as politicians, and is there even such a thing as a hero.  Well, recently I got jury duty, so as I was sitting there 
thinking, I can’t 

not

 write a jury duty storyline for 

Ex Machina

. So as profoundly boring as jury duty sounds, I 

promise there’s an 

Ex Machina

 storyline coming up with the mayor getting picked for jury duty that’s going 

to be endlessly exciting. Big things are going to happen.

Y, The Last Man

 was always intended to end at about issue #60, so we’ve passed the halfway point in the se-

ries. By March, Yorick, the protagonist, and his friends will fi nally have left the United States to travel around 
the globe. Swashbuckling action and romance on the high seas, which will be a very diff erent book than 

Y

 

has been for the last few America-bound adventures.

At Marvel, I’m on 

Ultimate X-Men 

for at least the next year with 
artist Stuart Immonen.  By the 
time this [Update] comes out, 
Wolverine will have been missing 
from 

Ultimate X-Men

 for almost 

six months, which is the longest 
he’s ever been gone from the 
book. So it will be the big return 
of Ultimate Wolverine, and he’s 
going to fi nd out more about 
his past, and maybe a romantic 
relationship is going to blossom 
with Storm.  It’s great to do an 

X-Men

 book that’s not burdened 

with 30 years of continuity. If I 
have friends who like 

Y

 and 

Ex 

Machina

 but they haven’t read 

any other comics, 

Ultimate X-Men

 

is the one book that’s the most 
accessible. If all you’ve seen is 
an 

X-Men

 cartoon or the 

X-Men

 

movies and just have a vague 
awareness of the characters, then 
you can jump right into our book 
and enjoy it.

For more insights into Brian 
K. Vaughan and his upcom-
ing projects, don’t miss 
him at the 2005 Comic-Con 
International.

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34

COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

34

COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

Entries are now being accepted for the 17th annual Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards, to be given to the 
fi nest publications and creators of 2004. 

Publishers may submit any comic, graphic novel, or comics-related periodical or book that was shipped to 
retailers between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004.  The deadline for submissions is March 7.

The submitted items will be considered by a blue-ribbon panel of judges, who will select the fi nal items 
to appear on the Eisner Awards ballot. This year’s judges, who have been chosen by Awards Administrator 
Jackie Estrada, are:

Gib Bickel

, co-owner of the The Laughing Ogre in Columbus, Ohio. Bickel started reading comics with 

Amazing Spider-Man

 #148 and enjoys the comics medium more every year. He’s a regular participant in The 

CBIA (Comic Book Industry Alliance) website and is on the Free Comic Book Day committee. He and his part-
ners opened The Laughing Ogre in 1994; the store has won Best Comic Store in Columbus more than once 
in its ten years of operation.  

EISNER

AWARDS

2

0

0

5

JUDGES NAMED

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35

COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

35

COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

Steve Conley

, cartoonist, self-publisher, and online pioneer. He has written and illustrated his online and 

printed comics series 

Astounding Space Thrills 

since 1998 and has run the award-winning design studio Con-

ley Interactive since 1996. In addition to his co-creation comicon.com, Conley owns and manages such com-
ics-related websites as iCOMICS, BLOOP.tv, and The Pulse, a popular daily comics news site. He also serves as 
executive director of SPX, the Small Press Expo.

Katharine Kan

, librarian/consultant. Kan has been a comics reader all her life. As a librarian working with 

teens, she saw the new graphic novels being published in the mid-1980s as perfect for them. She started 
writing the fi rst column devoted to graphic novels in library literature, “Graphically Speaking,” in 1994 
(published in Voice of Youth Advocates). She has also been writing graphic novel reviews for Diamond 
Previews (posted at their Bookshelf website). Kat was a librarian in public libraries in Hawaii and Indiana 
from 1984 through 2002 and is now working as a freelance consultant, doing book selection for Brodart’s 
book distribution division, specializing in graphic novels and young adult literature. She is also chair of the 
Graphic Novel Task Force for Young Adult Library Services Association, a division of the American Library 
Association. 

Tom McLean

, associate editor in special reports at 

Variety

. He oversees his share of the more than 180 spe-

cials published each year on topics as diverse as the Oscars, videogames, and fi lm festivals. Tom has edited 
both of 

Variety

’s Comic-Con specials. Since joining 

Variety

 in 1999 he has written dozens of articles and also 

writes “Bags and Boards,” 

Variety

’s daily weblog 

on the business of comics. A comics and sci-fi  fan 
since his childhood in Edmonton, Canada, Tom has 
followed the comics industry since the mid-1980s. 
After earning a degree in journalism from the 
University of Arizona, he wrote his fi rst professional 
article about comics—on the death of Superman in 
1992—while on staff  at a small Arizona newspaper. 

Tom Russo

, freelance writer/reviewer. He regularly 

covers comic book movies and related genres as a 
contributing writer for 

Entertainment Weekly 

and

 

Premiere

 magazine. In recent years, he’s written 

production features on both 

Spider-Man

 movies and 

on 

Van Helsing; 

upcoming projects he’s covering 

include 

Sin City

 and 

Batman Begins.

 Tom reviews 

comics for 

EW

 and has also written for 

Wizard

 and, 

back in the day, 

Marvel Age

.

“The judges are chosen for their knowledge 
about comics, their wide-ranging tastes, and their 
impartiality,” says Estrada. Because publishers and 
creators have the opportunity to submit their work 
for consideration, the judges are able to look at the 
full spectrum of material published in the previous 
year. 

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36

COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

36

COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

Seriously, folks, you can choose from a number of ways to purchase a membership to attend Comic-Con. 
The most basic method is to wait until the convention, stand in line, and register onsite. Your other option is 
to register in advance, gain early entrance into the Exhibit Hall during Wednesday’s Preview Night, and best 
of all, save some cash.

Here’s how it works: On page the next page you’ll fi nd a Multipurpose Form with prices, discount cutoff  
deadlines, and other important information. Just fi ll it out, add your payment, and fax or mail it in. That’s it. 
Keep in mind that 

no

 memberships will be sold on Preview Night (Wednesday, July 13), so only those attend-

ees who have pre-registered for a full 4-day membership can gain admittance for that special night.

When picking up your badge and badge holder be sure to bring your confi rmation receipt and picture ID; 
you’ll also get your Souvenir Book and Events Guide, which will help you plan the rest of your weekend. 

The registration hours for Comic-Con 2005 are:

Wednesday: 3:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Thursday–Saturday: 9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Sunday: 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

And as always, pre-registration memberships are transferable or refundable until June 20. 

Pre-registering might not get you immortality, but when you gain entrance into the convention ahead of 
those other attendees it will certainly feel like a little slice of heaven. 

REGISTER!

COMIC-CON MEMBERS GAIN IMMORTALITY BY PRE-REGISTERING

Sir, we all appreciate 

that you came in costume, 

but you still have to buy a 

Comic-Con membership.

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SAN DIEGO 

JULY 14-17, 2005

Please send me information on exhibiting

in the Art Show.

Please have your Disabled Services

Department contact me about my special

needs.

Please send me a volunteer application

and information.

Please send me information about

participating in the Masquerade.

BADGES WILL NOT BE MAILED OUT IN ADVANCE.

All pre-registered badges will be available for pickup at
Attendee Pre-Registration in the Convention Center's
Sails Pavilion (Upper Level), beginning Wednesday,
July 13 at 4:00 p.m.

Please make checks and money orders

payable to COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL.

Check or Money Order        Visa         MasterCard          American Express

Credit Card Number                                                                    

 Expiration Date (mm/yyyy)

Do not write below this line - Office use only

Payment Type

2005 Badge #
Check #
Total Amount $

Company Name

Address

City

Phone

Fax

State

Zip

Country Code (if not USA)

Country (if not USA)

Check One

         Adult            Junior (7-16)           Senior (60+)

Note: All prices subject to change. *Children under 12 free with PAID adult membership.

Forms postmarked or faxed after

June 20, 2005 will

NOT BE PROCESSED

.

No e-mail registration will be

accepted.

Sorry, 

NO REFUNDS 

after

June 20, 2005.

Only 4-day pre-registered members can attend Preview

Night. No onsite registration will be available for Preview

Night—only badge pickup for pre-registered full members.

-the

Adults

$65.00

Juniors (7-16) & Seniors (60+)

$30.00

Full Membership At

-Door Prices

Pre-Registration Prices

 

(check one)             

Need Info?

 

(check as needed)

ONLY ONE
MEMBERSHIP PER
FORM PLEASE.
THIS FORM MAY
BE COPIED.

First Name

Last Name

Signature                                                                   

Must be postmarked by JUNE 8, 2005

Adults

$55.00

Juniors (7-16) & Seniors (60+)

$27.00*

Must be postmarked by JUNE 20, 2005

Adults

$65.00

Juniors (7-16) & Seniors (60+)

$30.00*

Must be postmarked by APRIL 20, 2005

Adults

$50.00

Juniors (7-16) & Seniors (60+)

$25.00*

Active Military with ID can pay the Jr/Senior price. This deal does not extend to dependants.

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38

COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

38

COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

Due to the overwhelming popularity of Comic-Con 2005, the Travel Desk is currently securing more hotel 
rooms for the weekend. Meanwhile, here are some awesome locations that had availability as of press time 
and that off er some amenities you may not have known about. 

“GET A ROOM!”

SEARCHING  FOR  A  PLACE  TO  HANG  YOUR  HAT  AND  STASH 

YOUR  SWAG?  WE’VE  GOT  SOME  HOT  PICKS  FOR  YOU.

We understand that you might want a location closer to Comic-Con itself, so check back regularly at the CCI website 
(

www.comic-con.org

) to see if your hotel of choice has added accommodations. In the meantime, if you wish to be wait-

listed for a particular hotel mentioned on page 37, please contact a Comic-Con travel specialists at 1-877-55-COMIC.

500 WEST

This quaint boutique hotel has just undergone a major renovation and off ers a fi tness 
center, café, and lounge. It’s European in style—that is, rooms have single or full beds and 
shared private bathrooms that lock. 550 West is part of a national registered historic land-
mark building, steps from the train and trolley stations, and right in the heart of down-
town San Diego. Had a long day at the convention? The Comic-Con shuttle hits 500 West. 
It’s close enough to be in the action, and unique enough to give you some peace at night. 

HOLIDAY INN SELECT MISSION VALLEY

Located in the heart of San Diego, The Holiday Inn Select Mission Valley features the 
reasonable prices one expects from Holiday Inn. The newly refurbished rooms are com-
plimented by a complete fi tness center with pool and spa, so you can soak your feet after 
a long day in the Exhibit Hall. A nearby trolley stop off ers quick, inexpensive access to 
Comic-Con. This is an ideal location for people interested in exploring San Diego as well 
as seeing Comic-Con.

LA QUINTA INN OLD TOWN

Another newly renovated property, La Quinta Inn Old Town off ers complimentary deluxe 
continental breakfast, pool and spa. Rooms feature free wireless high-speed Internet, 
microwave, refrigerator, coff eemaker, cable TV, and more, which is an ideal setup for 
someone hoping to save some cash. There’s free parking and it’s close to trolley stops for 
access to Comic-Con. Old Town off ers a wide variety of award-winning restaurants and 
has lots of interesting shops and historical sites.

SAN DIEGO MARRIOTT MISSION VALLEY

A beautiful outdoor pool and fi tness center, spacious rooms with cable, VCR, and com-
plimentary coff ee, and fantastic service make the Marriott in Mission Valley a wonderful 
alternative hotel. Business-minded travelers or guests who won’t be spending every 
waking hour at Comic-Con will appreciate the high-speed Internet access and other 
amenities. This location is also steps from a trolley stop, and in a central location for easy 
exploration in San Diego. 

SHERATON SAN DIEGO HOTEL AND MARINA

Need a vacation on your vacation? The Sheraton San Diego Hotel and Marina is nestled 
at the water’s edge on spectacular San Diego Bay and off ers panoramic views of the bay 
and the downtown city skyline. You’re a 10-minute drive from the Convention Center or 
free parking at local trolley stops, as well as close to the beach. Finally, as a member of the 
Starwood collection of hotels, the Sheraton off ers outstanding service and rooms that are 
beautifully appointed and extremely comfortable.

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39

COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

“GET A ROOM!”

Hotel 

Distance to 

Shuttle 1 Bed/1 person 1 bed/2 people

2 Beds

3 people

4 people

Parking Per Day

Convention Center

sgl rate

dbl rate

twin rate

tpl rate

quad rate

(Subject to Change)

500 West

7 blocks

YES

$74.00

$84.00

$84.00

n/a

n/a

$20 self

Bristol Hotel

7 blocks

YES

$140.00

$140.00

$150.00

$170.00

$190.00

$18 self

Courtyard by Marriott Downtown

9 blocks

YES

$169.00

$169.00

$169.00

$179.00

$189.00

$22 valet

Embassy Suites

5 blocks

YES

$175.00

$175.00

$185.00

$205.00

$225.00

$20 valet

Hacienda Hotel Old Town San Diego*  

4 miles

Trolley

$133.00

$133.00

$133.00

$133.00

$133.00

$18 self

Hilton Gaslamp

Across street

YES

$192.00

$192.00

$192.00

$212.00

$232.00

$21 valet

Holiday Inn on the Bay

13 blocks

YES

$152.00

$152.00

$152.00

$167.00

$182.00

$18 self/$22 valet

Holiday Inn Select San Diego*

4 miles

Trolley

$119.00

$119.00

$119.00

$119.00

$119.00

$5 self

Horton Grand

3 blocks

YES

$169/$229

$169/$229

$169/$229

$189/$249

$209/$269

$20 valet

La Quinta Inn Old Town*

4 miles

Trolley

$129.00

$129.00

$129.00

$129.00

$129.00

Free

Manchester Grand Hyatt

2 blocks

YES

$175.00

$175.00

$175.00

$200.00

$225.00

$20 self/$28 valet

Marriott Gas Lamp Quarter

2 blocks

YES

$189.00

$189.00

$209.00

$219.00

$239.00

$22 valet

Omni San Diego

Across street

YES

$189.00

$189.00

$199.00

$219.00

$239.00

$22 valet

Radisson Harbor View

13 blocks

YES

$140.00

$140.00

$140.00

$150.00

$160.00

$12 self

San Diego Marriott Mission Valley*

4 miles

Trolley

$132.00

$132.00

$132.00

$142.00

$152.00

$10 self/$17 valet

Sheraton SD Hotel & Marina*

1/2 mile

NO

$184.00

$184.00

$184.00

$194.00

$204.00

$15 self/$20 valet

Sheraton Suites

10 blocks

YES

$140.00

$140.00

$150.00

$170.00

$190.00

$20 valet

Staybridge Suites Riviera

10 blocks

YES

$159/$179

$159/$179

n/a

$159/$179

$159/$179

$15 self

US Grant

8 blocks

YES

$149.00

$159.00

$159.00

$169.00

$179.00

$22 self and valet

W San Diego

6 blocks

YES

$269.00

$269.00

$279.00

$299.00

$319.00

$29 valet

Westgate

7 blocks

YES

$169.00

$169.00

$189.00

$209.00

$229.00

$15 self and valet

Westin Horton Plaza

6 blocks

YES

$154/$169

$154/$169

$164/$179

$184/$199

$204/$219

$19 self/$25 valet

Wyndham Emerald Plaza

8 blocks

YES

$149.00

$159.00

$159.00

$169.00

$179.00

$24 valet

HOTEL AT-A-GLANCE CHART

Note:

 * Hotels not serviced by shuttle routes do not charge shuttle fees. While most hotels on the list are 

on shuttle routes hotels added in the future may not be. Please check with the Travel Desk. Hotel rates for 

hotels with shuttle routes include a $5 per night reimbursement to Comic-Con to help defray shuttle costs. 

San Diego city blocks are small compared to other cities and take 2-3 minutes to walk.

Important Information

 (Please read carefully)

All reservations require an advanced deposit equal to one night’s room and tax. Deposits can be made by 

credit card, check, or money order. The hotels will process advance credit card deposits on June 2, 2005. 

*Deposits are non-refundable beginning July 3, 2005.

 Reservations made after July 3, 2005 will require 

the deposit at the time of booking. The deposit is non-refundable. 

To Make Reservations

Make reservations online at 

www.comic-con.org

 or complete the form on the next page and mail it to the 

Travel Desk. 

By phone:

 Call 1-877-555-COMIC (1-877-552-6642) or 212-532-1660, M-F 9:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m. EST. 

By fax:

 212-779-6128. All fax reservations must be received by June 2, 2005. 

To make changes/cancella-

tions:

 Call the Comic-Con Travel Desk at 1-800-221-3531. Changes must be received 14 days prior to arrival, 

changes are on a request basis and are subject to availability/discretion of the hotel. Responsibility and 

liability: Comic-Con International and/or its agents act only in the capacity as agents for customers in all 

matters pertaining to hotel accommodations and transportation whether by railroad, motor car, airplane 

or any other means, and as such are not responsible for any damage, expense, or inconvenience caused by 

train or plane arrivals or departures, or by any change of schedule or condition from any loss, injury, or dam-

age to any person or property from any cause whatsoever. Baggage handling throughout the program is 

entirely at the owner’s risk. The customer agrees that show management and/or its agents shall not be held 

responsible in the event of any error or omission in any promotional material. 

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SAN DIEGO 

JULY 14-17, 2005

E-mail address

First Name

Last Name

Company Name

Address

City

Phone

Fax

State

Zip

Reservation Guarantee: 

All Comic-Con reservations will require an advance deposit equal to one room night and tax.

Deposits can be made by credit card, check, or money order. The hotels will process the advance credit card deposits on

June 2, 2005. The deposit is nonrefundable beginning on July 3, 2005. Reservations made after July 3, 2005 will require

the deposit at the time of booking and are nonrefundable at that point. If paying by check, please call the Travel Desk

for reservations and deposit instructions.

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The largest
gathering of
alternative,
independent and
self-published
comics in the
country!

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(The Golem’s Mighty Swing)

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(Johnny the Homicidal Maniac)

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(Inside Vineyland)

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42

COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO

WHO: 

Bill Moss

WHY’D YOU COME?

I work Small Press so I have to come, but even if I 
didn’t I’d come anyway to see the new comics and 
toys.

ANYTHING THAT’S GOT YOU GOING?

 

I just got here and everything just looks awesome.  
It’s huge.  

ANYTHING YOU’RE LOOKING TO SCORE? 

 

I usually come here looking for imported Japanese 
statues and comics that you don’t usually find in 
[regular] stores.

WHAT’S BEEN THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE SHOW? 

David Mack. He’s the artist of Kabuki and he was re-
ally nice.  He signed a couple books for me and [did] 
a sketch. That was something I was meaning to do 
for a few years and it finally happened.

FANTASTIC FANS

ATTENDEES  FROM  THE  2004  COMIC-CON  SPEAK  OUT!

WHO:

 Wendy and Todd Wells from San Diego, CA

HOW LONG TOGETHER:

 13 years

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN COMING TO CON:

4 years

WHAT FOR?

 Japanese Animation

TALK TO ME ABOUT YOUR LIFE WITH ANIME.

WENDY:

 We’ve collected for about 9 or 10 years

TODD:

 [I got into it watching] Battle of the Planets 

and Speed Racer.

WENDY:

 One of the series we really got into anime 

was 

Magic Knight Rayearth

 and occasionally we 

come across bits of that [at Comic-Con], get very 
excited and load up our bags.

TODD:

 Currently we like 

The Twelve Kingdoms

 

series.

ANY CON HIGHLIGHTS SO FAR?

WENDY:

 We missed the [Wednesday] preview night, 

then saw some antiques downstairs through Cen-
tury Guild. They had some amazing stuff [but] it all 
sold. We’re really disappointed. But it was so fun to 
see some on display that people hadn’t taken home 
or hauled off to their hotel rooms yet. Fun stuff.

Featuring new black & white AND color interior art!

On Sale March 2005 • 24 pages • $2.95

Jhonen Vasquez will be at the SLG booth at both the APE and

Comic-Con International: San Diego!

The first of two volumes collecting the original comic book series. 168 Digest-sized pages * $14.95

On Sale Now. To Miss it would be most heinous indeed.

Characters and images TM & © 1989, 2003 Creative Licensing Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

background image

Featuring new black & white AND color interior art!

On Sale March 2005 • 24 pages • $2.95

Jhonen Vasquez will be at the SLG booth at both the APE and

Comic-Con International: San Diego!

The first of two volumes collecting the original comic book series. 168 Digest-sized pages * $14.95

On Sale Now. To Miss it would be most heinous indeed.

Characters and images TM & © 1989, 2003 Creative Licensing Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

background image

Comic-Con International

PO Box 128458
San Diego, CA 92112-8458

www.comic-con.org

NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION

US POSTAGE PAID

COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL

Comic-Con International Update #1 • 2005

Inside: Latest Special Guests, New Hotel Information, & More!

Inside: Latest Special Guests, New Hotel Information, & More!