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Constituent Relations

Constituent Relations

NOAA's mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment and conserve and manage coastal and marine resources to meet the Nation's economic, social, and environmental needs. Our services touch at least $3 trillion of America's economy every day.

NOAA research is at the center of all NOAA services. Our research helps improve weather forecasts and enhances navigation and aviation safety, as well as a variety of coastal services. From remote sensing to climate research and ocean exploration – our world-class scientists conduct research that contributes to public safety, healthy ecosystems, and a robust economy. Today, NOAA's research team is working with partners to build concepts for Earth-system modeling that will help answer some of our most pressing questions about the planet and how we can build disaster-resilient communities.

Maintaining an active constituent relations program ensures that OAR and NOAA leadership communicate effectively and often with their most important customers.

Constituent Roundtables

Constituent involvement is essential to OAR's success as we strive to define our priorities and align them with the soon-to-be-released NOAA Five-Year Research Plan. The purpose of this series of Roundtables is to solicit input from key constituents to ensure OAR's priorities reflect the needs of our current and future partners and customers.

Environmental Data & Information Services Roundtable (July 10, 2007)

The nation relies on NOAA’s data and information services to provide the right information, in the right format, at the right time so they can make the right decisions. Dr. Richard Spinrad, Assistant Administrator for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, and Mary Kicza, Assistant Administrator for Satellite and Information Services, brought together a diverse group of high-level constituents to provide input to ensure NOAA’s research priorities will enable us to provide the high quality data, sophisticated models, and scientific knowledge our partners and customers will require in the future.

Ocean and Coastal Ecosystem Management (May 24, 2007)

In the coming years, integrating NOAA’s understanding, monitoring, and predicting of environmental change will be necessary to address the increasing complexity of ocean and coastal conservation and management issues. The purpose of this Roundtable was to solicit input from key leaders in the field to ensure OAR's priorities reflect the ocean and coastal ecosystem management needs of our current and future partners and customers. Four themes emerged from the Roundtable discussion – connectivity, attention to transitioning, the value of models, and the value of monitoring and observing systems.

Advanced Undersea Technologies Roundtable (March 13, 2007)

Undersea technologies allow researchers to examine, explore and study the oceans in new and inspiring ways. The purpose of this Roundtable was to solicit input from key leaders in the field to ensure OAR's priorities reflect the future undersea technology needs of our current and future partners and customers. This roundtable was held at OAR’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, WA. Dr. Eddie Bernard, PMEL Director, led participants on a tour of the laboratory following the roundtable discussions.

Building NOAA’s Weather & Water Social Science Program Roundtable (February 1, 2007)

Constituent involvement is essential for NOAA to develop a successful Weather and Water Social Science Program. This program will improve NOAA’s ability to analyze and effectively demonstrate the value of weather and water research, products and services. The purpose of this Roundtable was to solicit input from key leaders to ensure the Weather and Water Social Science Plan priorities reflect the needs of our current and future partners and customers and to ensure our efforts provide maximum value to society.

Participants will have the opportunity to review and comment on a draft of the Weather and Water Social Science Program Plan in the Fall of 2007. If you are interested in reviewing the draft plan, please contact OAR Communications.

Boston Roundtable (September 20, 2006)

This roundtable was the first in the series and was held at the headquarters of the American Meteorological Society. A wide range of topics were addressed during the discussion, including mission growth, partnerships, transitioning research to operations, education, and infrastructure. Participants focused on topics of interest to the Boston area.