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a rr e

e e

e rr    C

C o

o rr n

n e

e rr

http://education.usatoday.com

Wednesday

September 19, 2001

For customer service or delivery questions, call 1-800-757-TEACH

• Afghanistan demands
proof; • Today’s Debate:
Expanding law enforce-

ment power; • Airlines lobby for
$26B bailout package

• Tech giants help busi-
ness customers recover;
• Housing market shaky;

• Businesses contribute unprece-
dented amounts to relief efforts

• How the attacks will
change the the 2002
Salt Lake Olympics; •

NFL announces decision about
postponed games  

• Therapists see
increase in number of
patients; • Are young

people ready for a draft?; • Life as
usual, but in a different world 

Why do ‘they’ hate us?, News, 1,4A

List “the most bitter issues” that have led to resentment of
the U.S. Are there any viable solutions to each cause? 

Princeton law professor Richard Falk states, “America is the
most admired and most loved country in the world, but it is
also the most hated.” List 10 examples from today’s paper to
support his statement. (At least five or your examples should
come from this article.)

Xenophobia is the intense fear and/or hatred of foreigners or
anything foreign. In what way is xenophobia responsible for
the current crisis in America? What role is ignorance play-
ing? What is ironic about the fact that in some extremist
areas of the Middle East, “the USA. . . is portrayed as a land
of evil.” In other words, how do Americans regard the terror-
ists and their supporters?

D

D e

e v

v e

e ll o

o p

p ii n

n g

g    E

E v

v e

e n

n tt

W

Waan

ntteed

d:: A makeshift memo-

rial site was set up in New
York’s Central Park yesterday
for victims of last Tuesday's
terrorist attacks. There are
also candles and a "Wanted
Dead or Alive" newspaper
cover with the face of Osama
bin Laden on it. 

N

N

E

E

W

W

S:

S:

America faces 

‘new type of conflict’ 

(government, analysis, data
gathering, evaluation) page 2

MONEY:

Skyscrapers’ 

popularity could suffer

(creative thinking, design,
modeling, safety) page 2

SPORTS:

Players fight for

their competitive edge

(careers, competition, com-

parison, point of view) page 3

LIFE:

Many Americans want

revenge 

(intrapersonal-

introspective intelligence, 

art) page 3

I

NSIDE

USA TODAY

2,847

1,337

1,388

1,045,137

675,640

621,594

Clinton covered more than

Bill Clinton made more than 100 trips abroad during his

eight years in office, surpassing George Bush’s 60 trips

and Ronald Reagan’s 49. Clinton’s, Bush’s and Reagan’s

travel on Air Force One over their entire administrations:

USA TODAY Snapshots

®

By April Umminger and Adrienne Lewis, USA TODAY

Source: Andrews Air Force Base

1 million miles in office

Hours flown:

Miles flown:

Bill Clinton

George Bush

Ronald Reagan

Bill Clinton

George Bush

Ronald Reagan

Why does the president need to travel so much?
What would explain the sharp  increase in the
hours and miles flown by Bill Clinton? How do
you think George W. Bush will compare?

Explain to your student
what the term b

biiaass

means.  People can be
biased (prejudiced)
against  something or
biased (partial) in favor of
something. In short,
when a person exhibits
bias, she or he has a
strong positive or nega-
tive view on something.
With your students, look
for examples of bias in
today’s newspaper.

N

N

E

E

W

W

S   T

S   T

O   U

O   U

S

S

E

E

I

NSIDE

E

XPERIENCE

TODAY

By Shawn Baldwin, AP

ESL

CONNECTIONS

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continues

Wednesday

September 19, 2001

Page 2

A

Am

me

erriicca

a’’ss   n

ne

ew

w   w

wa

arr:: Gulf War veteran  Jeff

Barber bows his head in a moment of prayer
at  the Civic Plaza in Albuquerque, N.M., last
friday. The Bush administration is trying to
brace Americans for a war with a different
type of foe and greater loss of life.

By Rose Palmisan, The Albuquerque Journal/AP

America faces ‘new type

of conflict,’ 8A

APPLICATIONS:  

government, analy

sis, data gathering, evaluation 

DISCUSSION:

How is the war that the U.S. is p

reparing to

wage against the terrorists going t

o be different from any

other war it has fought? Why

is it going to be different? Wh

y

will the crafty use of the “eleme

nt of surprise” be crucial to

success? Why do military officia

ls warn that the “normal

rules of warfare do not apply” i

n this case? In what way will

this war be a “secret” one? In yo

ur opinion, is this a prudent

and necessary strategy or a da

ngerous and ill-advised

approach? Cite specific example

s from the article to support

your position. 

ACTIVITY:

It has been said that it isn’t the m

ilitary who start

wars, but the politicians. On pap

er, list 10 examples that sup-

port this idea and 10 that refute

 it.

Skyscrapers’ populari-

ty could suffer, 1B

APPLICATIONS:

creative thinking, design, modeling, saf

ety

DISCUSSION:

How is the skyscraper an “Amer

ican land-

mark”? What makes them so va

luable, both aesthetically

and commercially? Do you thin

k that the widespread fear

of skyscrapers will stop Americ

ans from building and

working in them in the future? E

xplain your position.

ACTIVITY:

Given the threats that skyscrap

ers now face,

draft a design of a new, safer larg

e-capacity office build-

ing. What features will you inclu

de to deter terrorism and

protect the building’s tenants fro

m different types of

attacks? Identify all the safety im

provements that your

building will have, including str

uctural plans for quicker

evacuations and features to aid i

n extinguishing fires.

Once your blueprint is complete, t

ry building a scale

model of your building. Share y

our ideas with the class. Is

it possible to prevent all types of d

isasters?

Th

e

W

W               R

R   D

D

II

SS

E

E

Life as usual, but in a
world forever
changed, Life, 1D

Define the following words
as used in the article:

1. plies

2. disconcerting

3. carnage

4. despair

5. tabloids

6. esplanade

A ANN

S SWW

E ERR

S S::

1. crosses or sails 

2. disturbing; 

distr

essing

3. massacre; killing

4. misery

; gloom

5. small-format

new

spaper, usuall

y

with sensational

articles

6. flat, open str

etc

h

ofpa

vement

Experience

Special note: Our thoughts and prayers go out to the victims of last Tuesday’s tragedies.

background image

T h i s

T h i s

D a y

D a y

I n

I n

H i s t

H i s t

o r y

o r y

Experience

Wednesday

September 19, 2001

Page 3

continues

Th

e

Players fight for t

heir

competitive edge

, 1-2C

APPLICATIONS: 

careers, competition, com

parison, perspectiv

e

DISCUSSION:

Why might it be d

ifficult for some a

thletes to

find a spirit of fier

ce competitivene

ss in the wake of l

ast

week’s tragedies?

 How are football p

layers coping as t

hey

attempt to regain

 a sense of normal

cy?

ACTIVITY:

Baltimore Ravens

 linebackers coach 

Jack Del

Rio says that footb

all is a “battle” an

d the players are f

ight-

ing for their “livel

ihood,” their futu

re and “their abili

ty to

support their fam

ilies;” but military

 soldiers differ in t

hat

they are fighting f

or their lives and

our lives. How is s

etting

up on the line of s

crimmage in a footb

all game similar t

o

going to the front

 lines of a battle? W

hat loyalties, attit

udes,

strategies and ph

ysical skills must b

oth athletes and s

oldiers

possess? List 10 cha

racteristics that t

hese two occupa

tions

have in common.

In groups, brainstorm a list of all the
forces in the year 2001 that “can carry
light to all the corners of the globe.” In
writing, explain how each force
impacts the world.

• In 1881, the 20th president of the United
States, James A. Garfield, died of wounds
inflicted by an assassin.

• In 1906, addressing the annual dinner of
The Associated Press, Mark Twain said
there were "only two forces that can carry
light to all the corners of the globe ... the
sun in the heavens and The Associated
Press down here."

• In 1957, the United States conducted its
first underground nuclear test, in Nevada. 

• In 1991, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir accused the United States of tilting
toward the Arabs in its eagerness to organ-
ize a Mideast peace conference.

September 19

4

Get an Acrobat PDF version of “Experience Today”

at our Web site: http://education. usatoday.com —
click on “Daily Lesson Plan.”

4

Experience TODAY, developed by USA TODAY

Education, is written and edited by Mary Barnes
and Bryant Welch. To send your feedback, e-mail
education@usatoday.com, call 1-800-USA-3415,
ext. 5949, or send a fax to 703-558-3986.

Many Americans

 want

revenge, 1-2D

APPLICATIONS: 

art, intrapersonal-intr

ospectiv

e intelligence

DISCUSSION:

What is the differen

ce between “jus

tice” and

“revenge”? D

o you agree that

 “violence (wi

ll) beget more

violence”? In yo

ur opinion, how s

hould the U.S. re

spond?

ACTIVITY:

Former Pre

sident John F. Ke

nnedy once said

,

“Mankind must pu

t an end to war, o

r war will put a

n end to

mankind.” Find f

ive examples in t

he article that sup

port

this statement a

nd 10 photos o

r graphics in the

 paper that

also illustrate it

. Cut out the exa

mples you found

, and paste

them into a colla

ge that illustrate

s the severe a

nd disturbing

nature of w

ar. (Note: not a

ll statements a

nd photos shou

ld

be negative; foc

us on people

 working to put a

n end to war

as well.) Share yo

ur work with class

mates, and expla

in why

you chose the w

ords and graphics t

hat you did.

background image

Experience

Wednesday

September 19, 2001

Page 4

continues

Th

e

W

Wh

hy

y  d

do

oe

ess  tth

he

e  U

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ve

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ov

ve

errsse

ea

ass  a

att  a

an

ny

y  g

giiv

ve

en

n

ttiim

me

e?

?  W

Wh

ha

att  a

arre

e  sso

om

me

e  o

off  tth

he

e  a

ad

dv

va

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esse

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ess?

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hy

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xtte

en

nssiiv

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elly

y?

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h   tth

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e   iin

nccrre

ea

assiin

ng

g   p

prro

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ba

ab

biilliitty

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Am

me

erriicca

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ng

ga

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giin

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g  iin

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e  ffiirrsstt  w

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arr  o

off  tth

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ha

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ess  a

ah

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ad

d  ffo

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ttrro

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ab

brro

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ad

d?

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ha

att  a

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bo

ou

utt  tth

he

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ess  iin

n

tth

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ow

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nu

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err  o

off  U

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oo

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ex

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ye

ea

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en

n  y

ye

ea

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?

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ha

att   iiss   ““sse

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ho

o   iiss

tte

ecch

hn

niicca

alllly

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elliig

giib

blle

e   tto

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miilliitta

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y  d

du

utty

y  iin

n  a

a  ttiim

me

e  o

off  w

wa

arr?

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Ho

ow

w    d

do

o

y

yo

ou

u  ffe

ee

ell  a

ab

bo

ou

utt  tth

he

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y  o

off  y

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SSttu

ud

de

en

ntt  C

Ch

ha

alllle

en

ng

ge

e  o

on

n  ..  ..  ..    

Army

39%

Navy

26%

Air

Force

24%

Marine

Corps

11%

U.S. troops stationed overseas

More than 263,000 U.S. military personnel are

stationed abroad. Each service branch’s share

1

 of the

troops overseas:

USA TODAY Snapshots

®

By William Risser and Frank Pompa, USA TODAY

Source: Defense Department

1 – As of Dec. 31.

Teen Issues

C

C o

o m

m m

m u

u n

n ii tt y

y    &

&    F

F a

a m

m ii ll y

y

Civility and politeness
bloom, Life, 8D

What recent behavioral changes

are being noticed across the USA?
What are some of the statistical
indications  of this “new civility”?
How could our nation change as a
whole with this attitude? Could the
effects be permanent?

Ask your family members if they

have  noticed  any changes in their
behavior. Have you noticed a change
in yours? Have you been more polite
to strangers? Has your family been
closer recently? How have your 
lives  changed as a result of last
week’s attacks? 

How can some good come from

the tragedies that our nation has
faced? Make a list of all the positive
actions that you have seen
Americans taking.

E

E

E

E

X

XT

TR

RA

A

X

XT

TR

RA

A

C

C

C

C

R

RE

ED

DIIT

T

R

RE

ED

DIIT

T

!

!

!

!

O

Ob

bjje

eccttiiv

ve

ess

S

Sttu

ud

de

en

ntt  g

grro

ou

up

pss  w

wiillll::  

v

v

IId

de

en

nttiiffy

y  tth

he

e  cca

au

usse

ess  o

off  tth

he

e  cco

on

nttiin

nu

uiin

ng

g  

cco

on

nfflliicctt  iin

n  IIssrra

ae

ell..

v

v

B

Brra

aiin

nsstto

orrm

m  a

a  lliisstt  o

off  cch

ha

an

ng

ge

ess  iin

n  a

attttiittu

ud

de

ess,,

p

po

olliiccy

y,,  b

bo

ou

un

nd

da

arriie

ess,,  e

ettcc..  tth

ha

att  cco

ou

ulld

d  lle

ea

ad

d  

tto

o  p

pe

ea

acce

e..

v

v

D

De

ev

ve

ello

op

p  ffiiv

ve

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no

on

n--ttrra

ad

diittiio

on

na

all  sso

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uttiio

on

nss  

tto

o  tth

he

e  ccrriissiiss  a

an

nd

d  p

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en

ntt  e

ea

acch

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IIn

nssttrru

uccttiio

on

nss:: You have examined the changes that could lead

to peace in Israel; now it’s time to develop some specific
solutions. Obviously, many traditional approaches have failed
to work. Your challenge is to devise five n

no

on

n--ttrra

ad

diittiio

on

na

all solu-

tions to the crisis — one for each of the following parties to
implement: 1.) Israeli/Palestinian leaders 2.)
Israeli/Palestinian citizens 3.) Israeli/Palestinian young people
(under 18) 4.) U.S. leaders 5.) an individual. In short, identify
an innovative action that each party can undertake to pro-
mote peace.

M O N T H L

M O N T H L

Y

Y

P
R

O

J

E
C
T

Week 3

Synthesis

Israel

H

Ho

ow

w  tto

o  tta

allk

k  tto

o  k

kiid

dss    

a

ab

bo

ou

utt  tth

he

e  ccrriissiiss

(From the National Association of School Psychologists)

Children, like many 

people, may be frightened 
or confused by last week’s
attacks on the World Trade
Center and Pentagon. As we
learn more, adults can help
children work through their
emotions by following some
of these steps:

t

Be calm and in control.

t

Reassure children that
they are safe.

t

Remind them that
there are trustworthy
people in charge.

t

Tell the truth.

t

Stick to the facts. 

t

Let kids know it’s okay
to be upset.