background image

Freedom of Information and Protection

of Privacy Act

CHAPTER 5 OF THE ACTS OF 1993

as amended by

© 2018 Her Majesty the Queen in right of the Province of Nova Scotia

Published by Authority of the Speaker of the House of Assembly

Halifax

1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11; 2002, c. 5, ss. 18, 19; 2004, c. 4, s. 112;

2007, c. 9, ss. 8, 9; 2008, c. 35, s. 10; N.S. Reg. 205/2009, s. 2;

2010, c. 35, s. 36; 2010, c. 41, s. 111; 2011, c. 41, s. 143; 2011, c. 67, s. 11;

2012, c. 3, s. 21; 2012, c. 24, s. 25; 2012, c. 62, s. 3; 2014, c. 32, s. 116;

2015, c. 8, s. 14; 2015, c. 19, s. 19; 2015, c. 32, s. 74;

2018, c. 1, Sch. A, ss. 112-114

background image

This page is intentionally blank.

background image

APRIL 1, 2018

CHAPTER 5 OF THE ACTS OF 1993

amended 1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11; 2002, c. 5, ss. 18, 19; 2004, c. 4, s. 112;

2007, c. 9, ss. 8, 9; 2008, c. 35, s. 10; N.S. Reg. 205/2009, s. 2;

2010, c. 35, s. 36; 2010, c. 41, s. 111; 2011, c. 41, s. 143; 2011, c. 67, s. 11;

2012, c. 3, s. 21; 2012, c. 24, s. 25; 2012, c. 62, s. 3; 2014, c. 32, s. 116;

2015, c. 8, s. 14; 2015, c. 19, s. 19; 2015, c. 32, s. 74;

2018, c. 1, Sch. A, ss. 112-114

An Act Respecting the Right of Access to

Documents of Public Bodies in Nova Scotia

and a Right of Privacy with Respect to

Personal Information Held by

Public Bodies in Nova Scotia

Table of Contents

(The table of contents is not part of the statute)

Section

Short title...........................................................................................................................................

1

Purpose of Act...................................................................................................................................

2

Interpretation.....................................................................................................................................

3

Amendment of Schedule...................................................................................................................

3A

Application of Act.............................................................................................................................

4

Conflict with other enactments .........................................................................................................

4A

Access to Records

Right of access ..................................................................................................................................

5

Procedure for obtaining access .........................................................................................................

6

Duty of head of public body .............................................................................................................

7

Duties of head of public body where access given ...........................................................................

8

Extension of time for response..........................................................................................................

9

Transfer of request ............................................................................................................................

10

Fees ...................................................................................................................................................

11

Exemptions

Intergovernmental affairs ..................................................................................................................

12

Deliberations of Executive Council ..................................................................................................

13

Advice to public body or minister.....................................................................................................

14

Law enforcement...............................................................................................................................

15

Solicitor-client privilege ...................................................................................................................

16

Financial or economic interests.........................................................................................................

17

Health and safety...............................................................................................................................

18

Conservation .....................................................................................................................................

19

Closed meetings of local public bodies............................................................................................. 19A

Academic research ............................................................................................................................ 19B

Certain personal information ............................................................................................................ 19C

Labour conciliation records .............................................................................................................. 19E

Disclosure Harmful to Personal Privacy

Personal information .........................................................................................................................

20

Confidential information...................................................................................................................

21

Notices ..............................................................................................................................................

22

Decisions...........................................................................................................................................

23

background image

2                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

Protection of Personal Privacy:

Collection, Protection, Retention,

Use and Disclosure of Personal Information

Treatment of personal information ....................................................................................................

24

Correction of errors and omissions....................................................................................................

25

Use of personal information ..............................................................................................................

26

Disclosure of personal information ...................................................................................................

27

Use compatible for purpose information obtained ............................................................................

28

Disclosure for research purpose.........................................................................................................

29

Disclosure by Public Archives...........................................................................................................

30

Disclosure in public interest ..............................................................................................................

31

Review and Appeal

Requests and appeals to court............................................................................................................

32

Review Officer...................................................................................................................................

33

Procedure for request for a review.....................................................................................................

34

Settlement through mediation............................................................................................................

35

Where failure to settle........................................................................................................................

36

Reviews..............................................................................................................................................

37

Duties and powers of Review Officer................................................................................................

38

Duties and powers on completing review..........................................................................................

39

Duties of head on receipt of report ....................................................................................................

40

Appeal to Supreme Court ..................................................................................................................

41

Powers of Supreme Court..................................................................................................................

42

General

Exercise of right or power .................................................................................................................

43

Delegation of powers by head of public body ...................................................................................

44

Burden of proof..................................................................................................................................

45

Limitation of liability.........................................................................................................................

46

Offence and penalty ...........................................................................................................................

47

Directory respecting records of public bodies ...................................................................................

48

Regulations ........................................................................................................................................

49

Duty to designate head....................................................................................................................... 49A

Review of Act ....................................................................................................................................

50

Repeal ................................................................................................................................................

51

Effective date .....................................................................................................................................

52

Schedule

__________

Short title

1

This Act may be cited as the 

Freedom of Information and Protection

of Privacy Act

.  

1993, c. 5, s. 1

.

Purpose of Act

2

The purpose of this Act is
(a)

to ensure that public bodies are fully accountable to the public

by

(i)

giving the public a right of access to records,

(ii)

giving  individuals  a  right  of  access  to,  and  a  right  to

correction of, personal information about themselves,

(iii)

specifying limited exceptions to the rights of access,

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

3

APRIL 1, 2018

(iv)

preventing  the  unauthorized  collection,  use  or  disclo-

sure of personal information by public bodies, and

(v)

providing for an independent review of decisions made

pursuant to this Act; and
(b)

to  provide  for  the  disclosure  of  all  government  information

with necessary exemptions, that are limited and specific, in order to

(i)

facilitate  informed  public  participation  in  policy  for-

mulation,

(ii)

ensure fairness in government decision-making,

(iii)

permit the airing and reconciliation of divergent views;

(c)

to protect the privacy of individuals with respect to personal

information about themselves held by public bodies and to provide individu-

als with a right of access to that information.  

1993, c. 5, s. 2

.

Interpretation

3

(1)

In this Act,
(a)

“background information” means
(i)

any factual material,

(ii)

a public opinion poll,

(iii)

a statistical survey,

(iv)

an appraisal,

(v)

an economic forecast,

(vi)

an  environmental-impact  statement  or  similar

information,

(vii)

a final report or final audit on the performance

or efficiency of a public body or on any of its programs or pol-

icies,

(viii) a consumer test report or a report of a test car-

ried out on a product to test equipment of a public body,

(ix)

a feasibility or technical study, including a cost

estimate, relating to a policy or project of a public body,

(x)

a report on the results of field research under-

taken before a policy proposal is formulated,

(xi)

a  report  of  an  external  task  force,  advisory

board  or  similar  body  that  has  been  established  to  consider

any matter and make reports or recommendations to a public

body, or

background image

4                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

(xii)

a plan or proposal to establish a new program or

to  change  a  program,  if  the  plan  or  proposal  has  been
approved or rejected by the head of the public body;

(b)

“employee”,  in  relation  to  a  public  body,  includes  a

person  retained  under  an  employment  contract  to  perform  services
for the public body;

(c)

“head”, in relation to a public body, means

(i)

where the public body is a department, branch

or office of the Government of Nova Scotia, the minister who
presides over it,

(ii)

where the public body is a board, commission,

foundation, agency, tribunal, association or other body of per-

sons  reporting  directly  to  a minister  in respect  of  its  day-to-
day operations, the minister,

(iii)

where the public body is a board, commission,

foundation, agency, tribunal, association or other body of per-

sons not reporting directly to a minister in respect of its day-
to-day operations, the chair or presiding officer of the board,

commission, foundation, agency, tribunal, association or other

body of persons,

(iiia) where the  public  body is a local public body,

the  person  or  group  of  persons  designated  pursuant  to  Sec-

tion 49A as the head, or

(iv)

in any other case, the person designated by the

regulations as the head of the public body;

(ca)

“hospital” means any agency, association, board, com-

mission, corporation, office, society or other body that is designated

as a hospital pursuant to the 

Hospitals Act

;

(d)

“judicial  administration  record”  means  a  record  con-

taining information relating to a judge, including

(i)

a scheduling of judges and trials,

(ii)

content of judicial training programs, and

(iii)

statistics of judicial activity prepared by or for a

judge;

(e)

“law enforcement” means

(i)

policing, including criminal-intelligence opera-

tions,

(ii)

investigations that lead or could lead to a pen-

alty or sanction being imposed, and

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

5

APRIL 1, 2018

(iii)

proceedings that lead or could lead to a penalty

or sanction being imposed;

(ea)

“local public body” means

(i)

a hospital,

(ii)

a university,

(iii)

an education [entity] authority as defined in the

Education Act

,

(iv)

the  CollĂšge  de  l’Acadie  established  by  the

Community Colleges Act

, or

(v)

the  Nova  Scotia  Community  College  estab-

lished by the 

Community Colleges Act

;

(f)

“minister” means a member of the Executive Council;

(g)

“Minister” means the Minister of Justice;

(h)

“municipal unit” means a city, an incorporated town, a

municipality of a county or district or village commissioners incorpo-

rated pursuant to the 

Village Service Act

 or to whom that Act applies

and includes any agency, board or commission thereof;

(i)

“personal  information”  means  recorded  information

about an identifiable individual, including

(i)

the  individual’s  name,  address  or  telephone

number,

(ii)

the individual’s race, national or ethnic origin,

colour, or religious or political beliefs or associations,

(iii)

the  individual’s  age,  sex,  sexual  orientation,

marital status or family status,

(iv)

an identifying number, symbol or other particu-

lar assigned to the individual,

(v)

the  individual’s  fingerprints,  blood  type  or

inheritable characteristics,

(vi)

information  about  the  individual’s  health-care

history, including a physical or mental disability,

(vii)

information about the individual’s educational,

financial, criminal or employment history,

(viii) anyone  else’s  opinions  about  the  individual,

and

(ix)

the  individual’s  personal  views  or  opinions,

except if they are about someone else;

(j)

“public body” means

background image

6                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

(i)

a Government department or a board, commis-

sion, foundation, agency, tribunal, association or other body of

persons, whether incorporated or unincorporated, all the mem-

bers of which or all the members of the board of management
or board of directors of which

(A)

are appointed by order of the Governor

in Council, or

(B)

if  not  so  appointed,  in  the  discharge  of

their  duties  are  public  officers  or  servants  of  the

Crown,

and includes, for greater certainty, each body referred to in the

Schedule  to  this Act  but  does  not  include  the  Office  of  the
Legislative Counsel,

(ii)

the Public Archives of Nova Scotia,

(iii)

a body designated as a public body pursuant to

clause (f) of subsection (1) of Section 49, or

(iv)

a local public body;

(k)

“record” includes books, documents, maps, drawings,

photographs, letters, vouchers, papers and any other thing on which

information is recorded or stored by graphic, electronic, mechanical
or other means, but does not include a computer program or any other

mechanism that produces records;

(l)

“Review Officer” means the Review Officer appointed

pursuant to Section 33;

(m)

“third  party”,  in  relation  to  a  request  for  access  to  a

record or for correction of personal information, means any person,

group of persons or organization other than

(i)

the person who made the request, or

(ii)

a public body;

(n)

“trade secret” means information, including a formula,

pattern, compilation, program, device, product, method, technique or
process, that

(i)

is used, or may be used, in business or for any

commercial advantage,

(ii)

derives  independent  economic  value,  actual or

potential, from not being generally known to the public or to

other persons who can obtain economic  value from its disclo-

sure or use,

(iii)

is the subject of reasonable efforts to prevent it

from becoming generally known, and

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

7

APRIL 1, 2018

(iv)

the disclosure of which would result in harm or

improper benefit;
(o)

“university”  means  a  person  located  in  the  Province,

including a natural person, an association of natural persons, a part-

nership  or  a  corporation  that  is  authorized  by  the 

Degree Granting

Act

 to grant any recognition of academic achievement that is called a

degree, including degrees of bachelor, master and doctorate. 

1993, c. 5,

s. 3; 1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 1; 2018, c. 1, Sch. A, s. 112

.

Amendment of Schedule

3A

(1)

The  Governor  in  Council  may,  by  regulation,  amend  the

Schedule to this Act by

(a)

adding the name of a body to the Schedule;

(b)

deleting the name of a body from the Schedule;

(c)

changing the name of a body, as set out in the Sched-

ule, to any other name that the body is given.

(2)

For greater certainty, nothing in subsection (1) means or shall

be construed as meaning that a school board or a university is a public body before
subclauses (ii) and (iii) of clause (ea) of Section 3 come into force by reason only of

being referred to in the Schedule to this Act.  

1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 2; 2018, c. 1, Sch. A,

s. 113

.

Application of Act

4

(1)

This Act applies to all records in the custody or under the con-

trol of a public body, including court administration records.

(2)

Notwithstanding subsection (1), this Act does not apply to
(a)

published material or material that is available for pur-

chase by the public;

(b)

material that is a matter of public record;

(c)

a record in a court file, a record of a judge of the Court

of Appeal, Supreme Court, Family Court or Provincial Court, a judi-

cial administration record or a record relating to support services pro-
vided to the judges of those courts;

(d)

a  note,  communication  or  draft  decision  of  a  person

acting in a judicial or quasi-judicial capacity;

(e)

a record that is  created  by or is in the custody of  the

Conflict of Interest Commissioner appointed pursuant to the 

Conflict

of Interest Act

, the Ombudsman or the Review Officer and that relates

to the exercise of that person’s functions pursuant to an enactment;

(f)

a record of a question that is to be used on an examina-

tion or test;

background image

8                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

(g)

material placed in the custody of the Public Archives

of Nova Scotia by or for a person, agency or other organization, other
than a public body;

(h)

material placed in the archives of a public body by or

for a person, agency or other organization other than the public body;

(i)

a record relating to a prosecution if all proceedings in

respect of the prosecution have not been completed; or

(j)

a  record  of  each  representation  made  on  behalf  of  a

public body to the Review Officer in the course of a review pursuant

to Section 32 and all material prepared for the purpose of making the

representation.

(3)

This Act does not
(a)

limit  the  information  otherwise  available  by  law  to  a

party  to  litigation  including  a  civil,  criminal  or  administrative  pro-
ceeding;

(b)

affect the power of any court or tribunal to  compel a

witness to testify or to compel the production of documents;

(c)

prohibit  the  transfer,  storage  or  destruction  of  any

record in accordance with any other Act or any regulation;

(d)

prevent access to records maintained in a public office

for the purpose of providing public access to information; or

(e)

restrict disclosure of information for the purpose of a

prosecution.  

1993, c. 5, s. 4; 1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, ss. 3, 23; 2010, c. 35, s. 36.

Conflict with other enactments

4A

(1)

Where there is a conflict between a provision of this Act and a

provision of any other enactment and the provision of the other enactment restricts

or prohibits access by any person to a record, the provision of this Act prevails over
the provision of the other enactment unless subsection (2) or the other enactment

states that the provision of the other enactment prevails over the provision of this
Act.

(2)

The  following  enactments  that  restrict  or  prohibit  access  by

any person to a record prevail over this Act:

(a)

subsection 121(2) of the 

Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore

Resources Accord Implementation (Nova Scotia) Act

;

(aa)

subsection  5(2)  of  the 

Child Pornography Reporting

Act

;

(b)

Section 19 of the 

Consumer Reporting Act

;

(c)

Section 51 of the 

Corporation Capital Tax Act

;

(d)

Section 7 of the 

Emergency 911 Act

;

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

9

APRIL 1, 2018

(da)

subsection 8(4) of the 

Fisheries and Coastal Resources

Act

;

(e)

Section 19 of the 

Forests Act

;

(f)

Section 17 and subsection 104(2) of the 

Health Protec-

tion Act

;

(g)

repealed 2010, c. 41, s. 111.

(ga)

Section 53A of the 

Interjurisdictional Support Orders

Act

;

(h)

subsection (7) of Section 9 of the 

Juries Act

;

(i)

Section 28 of the 

Labour Standards Code

;

(j)

Section 32 of the 

Maintenance Enforcement Act

;

(ja)

Section 57 of the 

Marine Renewable-energy Act

;

(k)

subsection (2) of Section 87 and Sections 150 and 175

of the 

Mineral Resources Act

;

(l)

subsection (5) of Section 7B, subsection (8) of Section

7C, subsection (6) of Section 98 and subsection (3) of Section 278E

of the 

Motor Vehicle Act

;

(m)

Sections 53, 61 and 62 of the 

Occupational Health and

Safety Act

;

(n)

subsection  (3)  of  Section  15  of  the 

Pension Benefits

Act

;

(o)

Sections 72 and 100 of the 

Petroleum Resources Regu-

lations

 made pursuant to the 

Petroleum Resources Act

;

(p)

subsection  (4)  of  Section  21  of  the 

Primary Forest

Products Marketing Act

;

(q)

Section 48 of the 

Public Trustee Act

;

(r)

Section 9 of the 

Statistics Act

;

(s)

subsection  (3)  of  Section  9  of  the 

Procedure Regula-

tions

 made pursuant to the 

Trade Union Act

;

(t)

subsection (8) of Section 37 and Section 45 of the 

Vital

Statistics Act

;

(u)

Sections  23  and  24  of  the 

Young Persons’ Summary

Proceedings Act

.

(3)

The Governor in Council may, by regulation, amend subsec-

tion (2) by

(a)

adding to that subsection a reference to an enactment;

background image

10                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

(b)

deleting a reference to an enactment from that subsec-

tion.

(4)

Notwithstanding  any  other  provision  in  this Act,  the  provi-

sions in the 

Vital Statistics Act

 relating to

(a)

rights of access to personal information, including the

right to request a search of personal information;

(b)

remedial  rights  relating  to  the  rights  described  in

clause (a);

(c)

correction of personal information; and

(d)

procedures relating to the matters referred to in clauses

(a)  to  (c),  including  the  payment  of  fees  and  the  searching  of  and
obtaining access to personal information,

apply in place of the provisions in this Act respecting the matters in clauses (a) to

(d).

(5)

repealed 2010, c. 41, s. 111.

1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 4; 2004, c. 4, s. 112; 2008, c. 35, s. 10; 2010, c. 41, s. 111; 2011, c. 41, s. 143;

2011, c. 67, s. 11; 2012, c. 24, s. 25; 2012, c. 62, s. 3; 2015, c. 19, s. 19; 2015, c. 32, s. 74.

ACCESS TO RECORDS

Right of access

5

(1)

A person has a right of access to any record in the custody or

under the control of a public body upon complying with Section 6.

(2)

The right of access to a record does not extend to information

exempted from disclosure pursuant to this Act, but if that information can reasona-

bly be severed from the record an applicant has the right of access to the remainder
of the record.

(2A)

Subject  to  subsection  (2B),  notwithstanding  anything  con-

tained in this Act, where the record is an executed contract

(a)

in which provision is made for
(i)

in  the  case  of  an  agreement  executed  by  the

Province, the Province,

(ii)

in  the  case  of  an  agreement  executed  by  a

board,  commission,  foundation,  agency,  tribunal,  association

or other body of persons, within the meaning of subclause (i)

of clause (j) of Section 3, the board, commission, foundation,
agency, tribunal, association or other body of persons, or

(iii)

in the case of an agreement executed by a local

public body, the local public body,

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

11

APRIL 1, 2018

to  make  a  substantial  transfer  of  risk  to  a  person,  including  risk

related to the operation or financing, or both, of government activi-
ties; and

(b)

that is, or is in a class of contracts that is designated,

before or within ninety days of the execution of the contract

(i)

by  regulations  by  the  Governor  in  Council,

where the contract is executed by the Province,

(ii)

by  the  legal  decision-making  authority  by

which  a  board,  commission,  foundation,  agency,  tribunal,
association  or  other  body  of  persons,  within  the  meaning  of

subclause (i) of clause (j) of Section 3, acts where the contract

is  executed  by  that  board,  commission,  foundation,  agency,
tribunal, association or other body of persons, or

(iii)

the legal decision-making authority by which a

local public body acts where the contract is executed by that

local public body,

the right of access extends to any information in the contract that, but for this sub-
section, would be exempted from disclosure pursuant to this Act.

(2B)

Subsection (2A) does not apply in respect of any information

in the contract, to which that subsection refers,

(a)

respecting trade secrets;

(b)

respecting  the  financial  and  business  information  of

the person to whom that subsection refers; and

(c)

the disclosure of which may reasonably be expected to

endanger the safety or health of the public, a person or a group of per-
sons.

(3)

Nothing in this Act restricts access to information provided by

custom or practice prior to this Act coming into force.  

1993, c. 5, s. 5; 1999 (2nd Sess.),

c. 11, s. 5

.

Procedure for obtaining access

6

(1)

A person may obtain access to a record by
(a)

making a request in writing to the public body that has

the custody or control of the record;

(b)

specifying  the  subject-matter  of  the  record  requested

with  sufficient  particulars  to  enable  an  individual  familiar  with  the

subject-matter to identify the record; and

(c)

paying any fees required pursuant to Section 11.

background image

12                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

(2)

The applicant may ask to examine the record or ask for a copy

of the record.  

1993, c. 5, s. 6.

Duty of head of public body

7

(1)

Where a request is made pursuant to this Act for access to a

record, the head of the public body to which the request is made shall

(a)

make every reasonable effort to assist the applicant and

to respond without delay to the applicant openly, accurately and com-

pletely; and

(b)

either
(i)

consider the request and give written notice to

the applicant of the head’s decision with respect to the request
in accordance with subsection (2), or

(ii)

transfer  the  request  to  another  public  body  in

accordance with Section 10.

(2)

The  head  of  the  public  body  shall  respond  in  writing  to  the

applicant within thirty days after the application is received and the applicant has

met the requirements of clauses (b) and (c) of subsection (1) of Section 6, stating

(a)

whether the applicant is entitled to the record or part of

the record and

(i)

where the applicant is entitled to access, stating

that access will be given on payment of the prescribed fee and

setting  out  where,  when  and  how,  or  the  manner  in  which,
access will be given, or

(ii)

where  access  to  the  record  or  to  part  of  the

record is refused, the reasons for the refusal and the provision

of this Act on which the refusal is based;
(b)

that the record is not  in  the custody or control of  the

public body; or

(c)

where the record would contain information exempted

pursuant to Section 15 if the record were in the custody or control of
the  public  body,  that  confirmation  or  denial  of  the  existence  of  the

record is refused,

and stating

(d)

the  name,  title,  business  address  and  business  tele-

phone number of an officer or employee of the public body who can
answer the applicant’s questions about the decision; and

(e)

that the applicant may ask for a review by the Review

Officer  within  sixty  days  after  the  applicant  is  notified  of  the  deci-

sion.

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

13

APRIL 1, 2018

(3)

The head of a public body who fails to give a written response

pursuant  to  subsection  (2)  is  deemed  to  have  given  notice,  on  the  last  day  of  the
period set out in that subsection, of a decision to refuse to give access to the record.

(4)

The head of a public body may refuse to disclose to an appli-

cant information

(a)

that is published and available for purchase by the pub-

lic; or

(b)

that, within thirty days after the applicant’s request is

received, is to be published or released to the public.

(5)

The head of a public body shall notify an applicant of the pub-

lication or release of information that the head has refused to disclose pursuant to
clause (b) of subsection (4).

(6)

Where  the  information  is  not  published  or  released  within

thirty  days  after  the  applicant’s  request  is  received,  the  head  of  the  public  body

shall reconsider the request as if it were a new request received on the last day of

that period, but the information shall not be refused pursuant to clause (b) of sub-
section (4).  

1993, c. 5, s. 7; 1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, ss. 6, 23

.

Duties of head of public body where access given

8

(1)

Where an applicant is informed pursuant to subsection (2) of

Section 7 that access will be given, the head of the public body concerned shall

(a)

where

 

the  applicant  has  asked  for  a  copy  pursuant  to

subsection (2) of Section 6 and the record can reasonably be repro-

duced,

(i)

provide  a  copy  of  the  record  or  part  of  the

record with the response, or

(ii)

give the applicant reasons for delay in provid-

ing the record; or
(b)

where  the  applicant  has  asked  to  examine  the  record

pursuant  to  subsection  (2)  of  Section  6  or  where  the  record  cannot

reasonably be reproduced,

(i)

permit  the  applicant  to  examine  the  record  or

part of the record, or

(ii)

give the applicant access in accordance with the

regulations.

(2)

The head of a public body may give access to a record that is a

microfilm, film, sound recording, or information stored by electronic or other tech-

nological means by

(a)

permitting the applicant to examine a transcript of the

record;

background image

14                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

(b)

providing the applicant with a copy of the transcript of

the record;

(c)

permitting, in the case of a record produced for visual

or aural reception, the applicant to view or hear the record or provid-

ing the applicant with a copy of it; or

(d)

permitting, in the case of a record stored by electronic

or  other  technological  means,  the  applicant  to  access  the  record  or
providing the applicant a copy of it.

(3)

The head of a public body shall create a record for an appli-

cant if

(a)

the  record  can  be  created  from  a  machine-readable

record in the custody or under the control of the public body using its

normal computer hardware and software and technical expertise; and

(b)

creating  the  record  would  not  unreasonably  interfere

with the operations of the public body.  

1993, c. 5, s. 8

.

Extension of time for response

9

(1)

The head of a public body may extend the time provided for in

Sections 7 or 23 for responding to a request for up to thirty days or, with the Review

Officer’s permission, for a longer period if

(a)

the applicant does not give enough detail to enable the

public body to identify a requested record;

(b)

a  large  number  of  records  is  requested  or  must  be

searched  and  meeting  the  time  limit  would  unreasonably  interfere

with the operations of the public body; or

(c)

more  time  is  needed  to  consult  with  a  third  party  or

other  public  body  before  the  head  of  the  public  body  can  decide
whether or not to give the applicant access to a requested record.

(2)

Where  the  time  is  extended  pursuant  to  subsection  (1),  the

head of the public body shall tell the applicant

(a)

the reason;

(b)

when a response can be expected; and

(c)

that the applicant may complain about the extension to

the Review Officer.  

1993, c. 5, s. 9; 1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 23

.

Transfer of request

10

(1)

Within  ten  days  after  a  request  for  access  to  a  record  is

received by a public body, or such longer period as the Review Officer may deter-

mine,  the  head  of  the  public  body  may  transfer  the  request  and,  if  necessary,  the

record to another public body if

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

15

APRIL 1, 2018

(a)

the  record  was  produced  by  or  for  the  other  public

body;

(b)

the other public body was the first to obtain the record;

or

(c)

the record is in the custody or under the control of the

other public body.

(2)

Where a request is transferred pursuant to subsection (1),
(a)

the head of the public body who transferred the request

shall notify the applicant of the transfer; and

(b)

the  head  of  the  public  body  to  which  the  request  is

transferred shall respond to the applicant in accordance with this Act
not later than thirty days after the request is received by that public

body unless this time limit is extended pursuant to Section 9.  

1993,

c. 5, s. 10; 1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 7

.

Fees

11

(1)

An applicant who makes a request pursuant to Section 6 shall

pay to the public body the application fee prescribed by the regulations.

(2)

The  head  of  a  public  body  may  require  an  applicant  who

makes a request pursuant to Section 6 to pay to the public body fees for the follow-
ing services:

(a)

locating, retrieving and producing the record;

(b)

preparing the record for disclosure;

(c)

shipping and handling the record;

(d)

providing a copy of the record.

(3)

An applicant is not required pursuant to subsection (2) to pay

a fee for the first two hours spent locating and retrieving a record.

(4)

Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply to a request for the appli-

cant’s own personal information.

(5)

Where an applicant is required to pay fees for services pursu-

ant to subsection (2), the head of the public body shall give the applicant an estimate

of the total fee before providing the services.

(6)

The head of a public body may require the applicant to pay the

estimated fee prior to providing the services pursuant to subsection (2).

(7)

On  request  of  the  applicant,  the  head  of  a  public  body  may

excuse an applicant from paying all or part of a fee referred to in subsection (2) if, in
the head’s opinion,

background image

16                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

(a)

the  applicant  cannot  afford  the  payment  or  for  any

other reason it is fair to excuse payment; or

(b)

the record relates to a matter of public interest, includ-

ing the environment or public health or safety.

(8)

The fees that applicants are required to pay for services pursu-

ant to subsection (2) shall not exceed the actual costs of the services.  

1993, c. 5, s. 11;

2002, c. 5, s. 18; 2007, c. 9, s. 8

.

EXEMPTIONS

Intergovernmental affairs

12

(1)

The head of a public body may refuse to disclose information

to an applicant if the disclosure could reasonably be expected to

(a)

harm the conduct by the Government of Nova Scotia

of  relations  between  the  Government  and  any  of  the  following  or

their agencies:

(i)

the  Government  of  Canada  or  a  province  of

Canada,

(ii)

a municipal unit or the Conseil scolaire acadien

provincial,

(iii)

an aboriginal government,

(iv)

the government of a foreign state, or

(v)

an international organization of states;

(b)

reveal information received in confidence from a gov-

ernment,  body  or  organization  listed  in  clause  (a)  or  their  agencies
unless the government, body, organization or its agency consents to

the disclosure or makes the information public.

(2)

The  head  of  a  public  body  shall  not  disclose  information

referred to in subsection (1) without the consent of the Governor in Council.

(3)

Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply to information in a record

that has been in existence for fifteen or more years.  

1993, c. 5, s. 12; 1999 (2nd Sess.),

c. 11, s. 8

2018, c. 1, Sch. A, s. 114

.

Deliberations of Executive Council

13

(1)

The head of a public body may refuse to disclose to an appli-

cant information that would reveal the substance of deliberations of the Executive

Council or any of its committees, including any advice, recommendations, policy

considerations or draft legislation or regulations submitted or prepared for submis-
sion to the Executive Council or any of its committees.

(2)

Subsection (1) does not apply to

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

17

APRIL 1, 2018

(a)

information in a record that has been in existence for

ten or more years;

(b)

information  in  a  record  of  a  decision  made  by  the

Executive Council or any of its committees on an appeal pursuant to

an Act; or

(c)

background  information  in  a  record  the  purpose  of

which is to present explanations or analysis to the Executive Council
or any of its committees for its consideration in making a decision if

(i)

the decision has been made public,

(ii)

the decision has been implemented, or

(iii)

five or more years have passed since the deci-

sion was made or considered.  

1993, c. 5, s. 13

.

Advice to public body or minister

14

(1)

The head of a public body may refuse to disclose to an appli-

cant  information  that  would  reveal  advice,  recommendations  or  draft  regulations

developed by or for a public body or a minister.

(2)

The head of a public body shall not refuse pursuant to subsec-

tion (1) to disclose background information used by the public body.

(3)

Subsection (1) does not apply to information in a record that

has been in existence for five or more years.

(4)

Nothing in this Section requires the disclosure of information

that the head of the public body may refuse to disclose pursuant to Section 13.  

1993,

c. 5, s. 14

.

Law enforcement

15

(1)

The head of a public body may refuse to disclose information

to an applicant if the disclosure could reasonably be expected to

(a)

harm law enforcement;

(b)

prejudice the defence of Canada or of any foreign state

allied to or associated with Canada or harm the detection, prevention
or suppression of espionage, sabotage or terrorism;

(c)

harm  the  effectiveness  of  investigative  techniques  or

procedures currently used, or likely to be used, in law enforcement;

(d)

reveal  the  identity  of  a  confidential  source  of  law-

enforcement information;

(e)

endanger the life or physical safety of a law-enforce-

ment officer or any other person;

(f)

reveal any information relating to or used in the exer-

cise of prosecutorial discretion;

background image

18                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

(g)

deprive a person of the right to a fair trial or impartial

adjudication;

(h)

reveal a record that has been confiscated from a person

by a peace officer in accordance with an enactment;

(i)

be detrimental to the proper custody, control or super-

vision of a person under lawful detention;

(j)

facilitate the commission of an offence contrary to an

enactment; or

(k)

harm the security of any property or system, including

a building, a vehicle, a computer system or a communications system.

(2)

The head of a public body may refuse to disclose information

to an applicant if the information

(a)

is  in  a  law-enforcement  record  and  the  disclosure

would be an offence pursuant to an enactment;

(b)

is in a law-enforcement record and the disclosure could

reasonably be expected to expose to civil liability the author of the
record or a person who has been quoted or paraphrased in the record;

or

(c)

is about the history, supervision or release of a person

who is in custody or under supervision and the disclosure could rea-
sonably be expected to harm the proper custody or supervision of that

person.

(3)

After a police investigation is completed, the head of the pub-

lic body shall not refuse to disclose to an applicant pursuant to this Section the rea-

sons  for  a  decision  not  to  prosecute  if  the  applicant  is  aware  of  the  police
investigation, but nothing in this subsection requires disclosure of information men-

tioned in subsections (1) or (2).  

1993, c. 5, s. 15

.

Solicitor-client privilege

16

The  head  of  a  public  body  may  refuse  to  disclose  to  an  applicant

information that is subject to solicitor-client privilege.  

1993, c. 5, s. 16

.

Financial or economic interests

17

(1)

The head of a public body may refuse to disclose to an appli-

cant information the disclosure of which could reasonably be expected to harm the
financial or economic interests of a public body or the Government of Nova Scotia

or the ability of the Government to manage the economy and, without restricting the

generality of the foregoing, may refuse to disclose the following information:

(a)

trade  secrets  of  a  public  body  or  the  Government  of

Nova Scotia;

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

19

APRIL 1, 2018

(b)

financial, commercial, scientific or technical informa-

tion that belongs to a public body or to the Government of Nova Sco-
tia and that has, or is reasonably likely to have, monetary value;

(c)

plans that relate to the management of personnel of or

the administration of a public body and that have not yet been imple-

mented or made public;

(d)

information the disclosure of which  could reasonably

be expected to result in the premature disclosure of a proposal or pro-

ject or in undue financial loss or gain to a third party;

(e)

information  about  negotiations  carried  on  by  or  for  a

public body or the Government of Nova Scotia.

(2)

The head of a public body shall not refuse to disclose pursuant

to subsection (1) the results of product or environmental testing carried out by or for
the public body, unless the testing was done

(a)

for a fee as a service to a person, a group of persons or

an organization other than the public body; or

(b)

for the purpose of developing methods of testing.  

1993,

c. 5, s. 17

.

Health and safety

18

(1)

The head of a public body may refuse to disclose to an appli-

cant information, including personal information about the applicant, if the disclo-

sure could reasonably be expected to

(a)

threaten  anyone  else’s  safety  or  mental  or  physical

health; or

(b)

interfere with public safety.

(2)

The head of a public body may refuse to disclose to an appli-

cant personal information about the applicant if the disclosure could reasonably be
expected to result in immediate and grave harm to the applicant’s safety or mental

or physical health.  

1993, c. 5, s. 18

.

Conservation

19

The head of a public body may refuse to disclose information to an

applicant if the disclosure could reasonably be expected to result in damage to, or
interfere with the conservation of,

(a)

fossil sites, natural sites or sites that have an anthropological

or heritage value;

(b)

an endangered, threatened or vulnerable species, subspecies or

race of plants, vertebrates or invertebrates; or

(c)

any other rare or endangered living resources.  

1993, c. 5, s. 19

.

background image

20                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

Closed meetings of local public bodies

19A

Where an enactment authorizes a meeting of the elected officials or

the governing body of a local public body or a committee of the governing body of

the local public body to be held in the absence of the public, the head of the local

public body may refuse to disclose to an applicant any record that would reveal

(a)

the draft of a resolution, by-law or other legal instrument by

which the local public body acts or the draft of a local bill that has been con-

sidered at a meeting held in the absence of the public unless the draft or legal

instrument requested by the applicant has been considered at a meeting open
to the public or the record has been in existence for more than fifteen years;

or

(b)

the substance of deliberations at a meeting held in the absence

of the public unless the subject matter of the deliberations has been consid-
ered at a meeting that is open to the public or the record has been in exist-

ence for more than fifteen years.  

1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 9

.

Academic research

19B

(1)

repealed 2012, c. 3, s. 21.

(2)

The head of a local public body may refuse to disclose details

of the academic research being conducted by an employee of the local public body

in the course of the employee’s employment.

(3)

Notwithstanding subsection (2), where possible, the head of a

local public body shall disclose the title and amount of funding being received with

respect to the academic research referred to in subsection (2).  

1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11,

s. 9; 2012, c. 3, s. 21.

Certain personal information

19C

The head of a university may refuse to disclose to an applicant per-

sonal information that is evaluative or opinion material compiled solely for the pur-
pose of

(a)

determining the applicant’s suitability for
(i)

appointment, promotion or tenure as a member of the

faculty of a university,

(ii)

admission to an academic program, or

(iii)

receipt of an honour or award;

or

(b)

evaluating the applicant’s research projects and materials,

if the information is provided explicitly or implicitly in confidence.  

1999 (2nd Sess.),

c. 11, s. 9.

19D

repealed 2015, c. 8, s. 14.

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

21

APRIL 1, 2018

Labour conciliation records

19E

The head of a public body may refuse to disclose
(a)

any information of any kind obtained by a conciliation board,

conciliation officer or mediator appointed pursuant to the 

Civil Service Col-

lective Bargaining Act

, the 

Corrections Act

, the 

Highway Workers Collective

Bargaining Act

,

 

the 

Teachers’ Collective Bargaining Act

 or the 

Trade Union

Act

 or by an employee of the Department of Labour or an employee, appoin-

tee or member of the Civil Service Employee Relations Board, the Correc-

tional Facilities Employee Relations Board, the Highway Workers Employee
Relations  Board  or  the  Labour  Relations  Board  for  the  purpose  of  any  of

those Acts or in the course of carrying out duties under any of those Acts;

(b)

any  report  of  a  conciliation  board  or  conciliation  officer

appointed pursuant to any of those Acts;

(c)

any  testimony  or  proceedings  before  a  conciliation  board

appointed pursuant to any of those Acts.  

1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 9

.

DISCLOSURE HARMFUL TO PERSONAL PRIVACY

Personal information

20

(1)

The  head  of  a  public  body  shall  refuse  to  disclose  personal

information to an applicant if the disclosure would be an unreasonable invasion of a
third party’s personal privacy.

(2)

In determining pursuant to subsection (1) or (3) whether a dis-

closure  of  personal  information  constitutes  an  unreasonable  invasion  of  a  third

party’s personal privacy, the head of a public body shall consider all the relevant cir-

cumstances, including whether

(a)

the disclosure is desirable for the purpose of subjecting

the activities of the Government of Nova Scotia or a public body to

public scrutiny;

(b)

the  disclosure  is  likely  to  promote  public  health  and

safety or to promote the protection of the environment;

(c)

the personal information is relevant to a fair determina-

tion of the applicant’s rights;

(d)

the disclosure will assist in researching the claims, dis-

putes or grievances of aboriginal people;

(e)

the third party will be exposed unfairly to financial or

other harm;

(f)

the  personal  information  has  been  supplied  in  confi-

dence;

(g)

the  personal  information  is  likely  to  be  inaccurate  or

unreliable; and

background image

22                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

(h)

the  disclosure  may  unfairly  damage  the  reputation  of

any person referred to in the record requested by the applicant.

(3)

A  disclosure  of  personal  information  is  presumed  to  be  an

unreasonable invasion of a third party’s personal privacy if

(a)

the  personal  information  relates  to  a  medical,  dental,

psychiatric,  psychological  or  other  health-care  history,  diagnosis,

condition, treatment or evaluation;

(b)

the personal information was compiled and is identifia-

ble as part of an investigation into a possible violation of law, except
to the extent that disclosure is necessary to prosecute the violation or

to continue the investigation;

(c)

the  personal  information  relates  to  eligibility  for

income assistance or social-service benefits or to the determination of
benefit levels;

(d)

the personal information relates to employment or edu-

cational history;

(e)

the personal information was obtained on a tax return

or gathered for the purpose of collecting a tax;

(f)

the  personal  information  describes  the  third  party’s

finances, income, assets, liabilities, net worth, bank balances, finan-

cial history or activities, or creditworthiness;

(g)

the  personal  information  consists  of  personal  recom-

mendations or evaluations, character references or personnel evalua-
tions;

(h)

the  personal  information  indicates  the  third  party’s

racial  or  ethnic  origin,  sexual  orientation  or  religious  or  political

beliefs or associations; or

(i)

the  personal  information  consists  of  the  third  party’s

name together with the third party’s address or telephone number and

is to be used for mailing lists or solicitations by telephone or other
means.

(4)

A  disclosure  of  personal  information  is  not  an  unreasonable

invasion of a third party’s personal privacy if

(a)

the  third  party  has,  in  writing,  consented  to  or

requested the disclosure;

(b)

there are compelling circumstances affecting anyone’s

health or safety;

(c)

an enactment authorizes the disclosure;

(d)

the  disclosure  is  for  a  research  or  statistical  purpose

and is in accordance with Section 29 or 30;

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

23

APRIL 1, 2018

(e)

the  information  is  about  the  third  party’s  position,

functions  or  remuneration  as  an  officer,  employee  or  member  of  a
public body or as a member of a minister’s staff;

(f)

the  disclosure  reveals  financial  and  other  similar

details of a contract to supply goods or services to a public body;

(g)

the information is about expenses incurred by the third

party while travelling at the expense of a public body;

(h)

the  disclosure  reveals  details  of  a  licence,  permit  or

other similar discretionary benefit granted to the third party by a pub-

lic  body,  not  including  personal  information  supplied  in  support  of

the request for the benefit; or

(i)

the disclosure reveals details of a discretionary benefit

of a financial nature granted to the third party by a public body, not

including  personal  information  that  is  supplied  in  support  of  the

request for the benefit or is referred to in clause (c) of subsection (3).

(5)

On  refusing,  pursuant  to  this  Section,  to  disclose  personal

information supplied in confidence about an applicant, the head of the public body
shall give the applicant a summary of the information unless the summary cannot be

prepared without disclosing the identity of a third party who supplied the personal

information.

(6)

The head of the public body may allow the third party to pre-

pare the summary of personal information pursuant to subsection (5).  

1993, c. 5, s. 20

.

Confidential information

21

(1)

The head of a public body shall refuse to disclose to an appli-

cant information

(a)

that would reveal
(i)

trade secrets of a third party, or

(ii)

commercial,  financial,  labour  relations,  scien-

tific or technical information of a third party;
(b)

that is supplied, implicitly or explicitly, in confidence;

and

(c)

the disclosure of which could reasonably be expected

to

(i)

harm  significantly  the  competitive  position  or

interfere  significantly  with  the  negotiating  position  of  the

third party,

(ii)

result  in  similar  information  no  longer  being

supplied  to  the  public  body  when  it  is  in  the  public  interest

that similar information continue to be supplied,

background image

24                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

(iii)

result in undue financial loss or gain to any per-

son or organization, or

(iv)

reveal information supplied to, or the report of,

an arbitrator, mediator, labour relations officer or other person

or body appointed to resolve or inquire into a labour-relations

dispute.

(2)

The head of a public body shall refuse to disclose to an appli-

cant information that was obtained on a tax return or gathered for the purpose of
determining tax liability or collecting a tax.

(3)

The  head  of  a  public  body  shall  disclose  to  an  applicant  a

report prepared in the course of routine inspections by an agency that is authorized

to enforce compliance with an enactment.

(4)

Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply if the third party consents

to the disclosure.  

1993, c. 5, s. 21

.

Notices

22

(1)

On receiving a request for access to a record that the head of a

public body has reason to believe contains information the disclosure of which must

be refused pursuant to Section 20 or 21, the head of the public body shall, where
practicable, promptly give the third party a notice

(a)

stating that a request has been made by an applicant for

access  to  a  record  containing  information  the  disclosure  of  which

may  affect  the  interests  or  invade  the  personal  privacy  of  the  third
party;

(b)

describing the contents of the record; and

(c)

stating  that,  within  fourteen  days  after  the  notice  is

given,  the  third  party  may,  in  writing,  consent  to  the  disclosure  or

may make written representations to the public body explaining why
the information should not be disclosed.

(1A)

Notwithstanding  subsection  (1),  that  subsection  does  not

apply if

(a)

the  head  of  the  public  body  decides,  after  examining

the  request,  any  relevant  records  and  the  views  or  interests  of  the
third party respecting the disclosure requested, to refuse to disclose

the record; or

(b)

where the regulations so provide, it is not practical to

give notice pursuant to that subsection.

(2)

When notice is given pursuant to subsection (1), the head of

the public body shall also give the applicant a notice stating

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

25

APRIL 1, 2018

(a)

that  the  record  requested  by  the  applicant  contains

information the disclosure of which may affect the interests or invade
the personal privacy of a third party; and

(b)

that  the  third  party  is  being  given  an  opportunity  to

make representations concerning disclosure.

(c)

repealed 1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 11.

(3)

For  greater  certainty,  the  time  limited  by  subsection  (2)  of

Section 7 for responding to a request for access to a record is not extended by reason

only that a notice is given to an applicant pursuant to subsection (2) of this Section,
but that time may be extended pursuant to Section 9.

(4)

In  complying  with  subsections  (1)  and  (2),  the  public  body

shall not

(a)

disclose  the  name  of  the  applicant  to  the  third  party

without the consent of the applicant; or

(b)

disclose  the  name  of  the  third  party  to  the  applicant

without the consent of the third party.  

1993, c. 5, s. 22; 1999 (2nd Sess.),

c. 11, s.  11.

Decisions

23

(1)

Within thirty days after notice is given to an applicant pursu-

ant to Section 22, the head of the public body shall decide whether to give access to
the record or to part of the record, but no decision may be made before the earlier of

(a)

fifteen days after the day notice is given; or

(b)

the day a response is received from the third party.

(2)

On reaching a decision pursuant to subsection (1), the head of

the public body shall give written notice of the decision to

(a)

the applicant; and

(b)

the third party.

(3)

Where the head of the public body decides to give access to

the record or to part of the record, the notice shall state that the applicant will be
given  access  unless  the  third  party  asks  for  a  review  pursuant  to  this Act  within

twenty days after the day notice is given pursuant to subsection (2).

(4)

Notwithstanding anything contained in this Section, the head

of a public body who has, pursuant to Section 22, given notice to a third party of a

request for access to a record may, with the consent of the third party, give access to
the record to the person who has made the request before the expiration of the time

limited by subsection (3) for the third party to ask for a review.  

1993, c. 5, s. 23; 1999

(2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 12.

background image

26                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

PROTECTION OF PERSONAL PRIVACY:

COLLECTION, PROTECTION, RETENTION,

USE AND DISCLOSURE OF PERSONAL INFORMATION

Treatment of personal information

24

(1)

Personal information shall not be collected by or for a public

body unless

(a)

the collection of that information is expressly author-

ized by or pursuant to an enactment;

(b)

that  information  is  collected  for  the  purpose  of  law

enforcement; or

(c)

that information relates directly to and is necessary for

an operating program or activity of the public body.

(2)

Where an individual’s personal information will be used by a

public body to make a decision that directly affects the individual, the public body

shall  make  every  reasonable  effort  to  ensure  that  the  information  is  accurate  and
complete.

(3)

The head of the public body shall protect personal information

by  making  reasonable  security  arrangements  against  such  risks  as  unauthorized

access, collection, use, disclosure or disposal.

(4)

Where  a  public  body  uses  an  individual’s  personal  informa-

tion  to  make  a  decision  that  directly  affects  the  individual,  the  public  body  shall

retain that information for at least one year after using it so that the individual has a
reasonable opportunity to obtain access to it.  

1993, c. 5, s. 24

.

Correction of errors and omissions

25

(1)

An applicant who believes there is an error or omission in the

applicant’s personal information may request the head of the public body that has

the information in its custody or under its control to correct the information.

(2)

Where no correction is made in response to a request pursuant

to subsection (1), the head of the public body shall annotate the information with the
correction that was requested but not made.

(3)

On correcting or annotating personal information pursuant to

this Section, the head of the public body shall notify any other public body or any

third party to whom that information has been disclosed during the one-year period

before the correction was requested.

(4)

On being notified pursuant to subsection (3) of a correction or

annotation  of  personal  information,  a  public  body  shall  make  the  correction  or
annotation on any record of that information in its custody or under its control.  

1993,

c. 5, s. 25

.

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

27

APRIL 1, 2018

Use of personal information

26

A public body may use personal information only
(a)

for  the  purpose  for  which  that  information  was  obtained  or

compiled, or for a use compatible with that purpose;

(b)

if  the  individual  the  information  is  about  has  identified  the

information and has consented, in the prescribed manner, to the use; or

(c)

for a purpose for which that information may be disclosed to

that public body pursuant to Sections 27 to 30. 

 1993, c. 5, s. 26

.

Disclosure of personal information

27

A public body may disclose personal information only

(a)

in  accordance  with  this Act  or  as  provided  pursuant  to  any

other enactment;

(b)

if  the  individual  the  information  is  about  has  identified  the

information and consented in writing to its disclosure;

(c)

for the purpose for which it was obtained or compiled, or a use

compatible with that purpose;

(d)

for  the  purpose  of  complying  with  an  enactment  or  with  a

treaty, arrangement or agreement made pursuant to an enactment;

(e)

for the purpose of complying with a subpoena, warrant, sum-

mons or order issued or made by a court, person or body with jurisdiction to

compel the production of information;

(f)

to an officer or employee of a public body or to a minister, if

the information is necessary for the performance of the duties of, or for the

protection of the health or safety of, the officer, employee or minister;

(g)

to a public body to meet the necessary requirements of gov-

ernment operation;

(h)

for the purpose of

(i)

collecting a debt or fine owing by an individual to Her

Majesty in right of the Province or to a public body, or

(ii)

making  a  payment  owing  by  Her  Majesty  in  right  of

the Province or by a public body to an individual;

(i)

to the Auditor General or any other prescribed person or body

for audit purposes;

(j)

to  a  member  of  the  House  of  Assembly  who  has  been

requested  by  the  individual,  whom  the  information  is  about,  to  assist  in
resolving a problem;

(k)

to  a  representative  of  the  bargaining  agent  who  has  been

authorized  in  writing  by  the  employee,  whom  the  information  is  about,  to

make an inquiry;

background image

28                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

(l)

to  the  Public Archives  of  Nova  Scotia,  or  the  archives  of  a

public body, for archival purposes;

(m)

to  a  public  body  or  a  law-enforcement  agency  in  Canada  to

assist in an investigation

(i)

undertaken with a view to a law-enforcement proceed-

ing, or

(ii)

from which a law-enforcement proceeding is likely to

result;
(n)

if the public body is a law-enforcement agency and the infor-

mation is disclosed

(i)

to another law-enforcement agency in Canada, or

(ii)

to  a  law-enforcement  agency  in  a  foreign  country

under an arrangement, written agreement, treaty or legislative author-

ity;
(o)

if the head of the public body determines that compelling cir-

cumstances exist that affect anyone’s health or safety;

(p)

so that the next of kin or a friend of an injured, ill or deceased

individual may be contacted; or

(q)

in accordance with Section 29 or 30.  

1993, c. 5, s. 27

.

Use compatible for purpose information obtained

28

A use of personal information is a use compatible with the purpose

for which the information was obtained within the meaning of Section 26 or 27 if
the use

(a)

has a reasonable and direct connection to that purpose; and

(b)

is necessary for performing the statutory duties of, or for oper-

ating a legally authorized program of, the public body that uses the informa-

tion or to which the information is disclosed.  

1993, c. 5, s. 28

.

Disclosure for research purpose

29

A public body may disclose personal information for a research pur-

pose, including statistical research, if

(a)

the  research  purpose  cannot  reasonably  be  accomplished

unless that information is provided in individually identifiable form;

(b)

any record linkage is not harmful to the individuals that infor-

mation is about and the benefits to be derived from the record linkage are
clearly in the public interest;

(c)

the  head  of  the  public  body  concerned  has  approved  condi-

tions relating to

(i)

security and confidentiality,

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

29

APRIL 1, 2018

(ii)

the  removal  or  destruction  of  individual  identifiers  at

the earliest reasonable time, and

(iii)

the prohibition of any subsequent use or disclosure of

that information in individually identifiable form without the express

authorization of that public body; and
(d)

the person to whom that information is disclosed has signed

an agreement to comply with the approved conditions, this Act and any of
the public body’s policies and procedures relating to the confidentiality of

personal information.  

1993, c. 5, s. 29

.

Disclosure by Public Archives

30

The Public Archives of Nova Scotia, or the archives of a public body,

may disclose personal information for archival or historical purposes where

(a)

the disclosure would not be an unreasonable invasion of per-

sonal privacy pursuant to Section 20;

(b)

the  disclosure  is  for  historical  research  and  is  in  accordance

with Section 29;

(c)

the  information  is  about  someone  who  has  been  dead  for

twenty or more years; or

(d)

the information is in a record that is in the custody or control

of the archives and open for historical research on the coming into force of
this Act.  

1993, c. 5, s. 30

.

Disclosure in public interest

31

(1)

Whether or not a request for access is made, the head of a pub-

lic body may disclose to the public, to an affected group of people or to an applicant

information

(a)

about a risk of significant harm to the environment or

to the health or safety of the public or a group of people; or

(b)

the disclosure of which is, for any other reason, clearly

in the public interest.

(2)

Before disclosing information pursuant to subsection (1), the

head of a public body shall, if practicable, notify any third party to whom the infor-

mation relates.

(3)

Where it is not practicable to comply with subsection (2), the

head of the public body shall mail a notice of disclosure in the prescribed form to
the last known address of the third party.

(4)

This Section applies notwithstanding any other provision of this Act.

1993, c. 5, s. 31.

background image

30                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

REVIEW AND APPEAL

Requests and appeals to court

32

(1)

A  person  who  makes  any  request  pursuant  to  this  Act  for

access to a record or for correction of personal information may ask for a review of
any decision, act or failure to act of the head of the public body that relates to the

request.

(2)

A third party notified pursuant to Section 22 of a request for

access may ask for a review of any decision made about the request by the head of

the public body.

(3)

Notwithstanding subsection (1), a person who makes a request

pursuant to this Act for access to a record or for correction of personal information
may, within thirty days after the person is notified of the decision or the date of the

act or failure to act, appeal directly to the Supreme Court pursuant to Section 41 if

there is no third party notified pursuant to Section 22 or any third party so notified
consents to that appeal.

(4)

 to 

(6)

repealed 2007, c. 9, s. 9.

1993, c. 5, s. 32; 2002, c. 5, s. 19; 2007, c. 9, s. 9

.

Review Officer

33

(1)

The Governor in Council shall appoint a person to serve full-

time as Review Officer.

(2)

A person appointed as Review Officer holds that office during

good behaviour for a term of not less than five years or more than seven years but

shall  be  removed  by  the  Governor  in  Council  on  the  passing  by  the  House  of
Assembly  of  a  resolution  carried  by  a  vote  of  a  majority  of  the  members  of  the

House of Assembly voting thereon requiring the Governor in Council to do so.

(3)

A person may be re-appointed as Review Officer.

(4)

The  Review  Officer  shall  be  paid  out  of  the  Consolidated

Fund of the Province such salary as the Governor in Council determines.

(5)

Such  officers  and  employees  as  are  necessary  to  enable  the

Review Officer to perform the duties of that office shall be appointed in accordance

with the 

Civil Service Act

.

(6)

The Review Officer shall prepare annually an estimate of the

sums required to be provided by the Legislature for the carrying out of this Act dur-
ing the fiscal year, which estimate shall be transmitted to the Priorities and Planning

Committee for its approval and shall be laid before the Legislature with the other

estimates for the year.

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

31

APRIL 1, 2018

(7)

The Review Officer shall issue an annual report on the exer-

cise of the functions of the Review Officer under this Act and shall lay the report
before the House of Assembly.  

1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 14

.

Procedure for request for a review

34

(1)

To ask for a review pursuant to Section 32, a written request

shall be filed with the Review Officer within

(a)

sixty  days  after  the  person  asking  for  the  review  is

notified of the decision;

(b)

sixty days after the date of the act or failure to act;

(c)

by a third party, twenty days after notice is given in the

case of a review pursuant to subsection (2) of Section 23; or

(d)

a longer period allowed by the Review Officer.

(2)

The failure of the head of the public body to respond in time

to a request for access to a record is to be treated as a decision to refuse access to the
record,  but  the  time  limit  in  clause  (a)  of  subsection  (1)  for  filing  a  request  for

review does not apply.

(3)

On receiving a request for a review, the Review Officer shall

forthwith give a copy to

(a)

the head of the public body concerned; and

(b)

any  other  person  that  the  Review  Officer  considers

appropriate.  

1993, c. 5, s. 34; 1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 23

.

Settlement through mediation

35

The Review Officer may try to settle a matter under review through

mediation.  

1993, c. 5, s. 35; 1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 23.

Where failure to settle

36

Where  the  Review  Officer  is  unable  to  settle  a  matter  within  thirty

days through mediation, the Review Officer shall conduct a review in accordance

with Section 37.  

1993, c. 5, s. 36; 1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 23.

Reviews

37

(1)

The Review Officer may conduct a review in private.

(2)

The following persons are entitled to make representations to

the Review Officer in the course of a review:

(a)

the person who applies for the review;

(b)

a third party or applicant who is entitled to notice pur-

suant to this Act;

background image

32                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

(c)

the head of the public body whose decision is the sub-

ject of the review; and

(d)

any other person the Review Officer considers appro-

priate.

(2A)

Where,  pursuant  to  clause  (d)  of  subsection  (2),  the  Review

Officer considers that a person is an appropriate person to make representations in

the course of a review of a decision of the head of a public body, then, notwithstand-

ing any other provision of this Act, that person

(a)

is entitled to
(i)

a copy of the report of the Review Officer pur-

suant to Section 39,

(ii)

appeal the decision of the head pursuant to Sec-

tion 41, and

(iii)

written notice of an appeal under subsection (2)

of Section 41; and
(b)

is a party to the appeal to which the notice of appeal

referred to in subclause (iii) of clause (a) relates.

(3)

The Review Officer may decide
(a)

whether the representations are to be made orally or in

writing;

(b)

whether  a  person  is  entitled  to  be  present  during  a

review or to have access to or comment on representations made to

the Review Officer by any other person.  

1993, c. 5, s. 37; 1999 (2nd Sess.),

c. 11, ss. 15, 23.

Duties and powers of Review Officer

38

(1)

Notwithstanding any other Act or any privilege that is availa-

ble at law, the Review Officer may, in a review,

(a)

require to be produced and examine any record that is

in the custody or under the control of the public body named in the

request made pursuant to subsection (1) of Section 6; and

(b)

enter and inspect any premises occupied by the public

body.

(2)

A  public  body  shall  comply  with  a  requirement  imposed  by

the Review Officer pursuant to clause (a) of subsection (1) within such time as is

prescribed by the regulations.

(3)

Where  a  public  body  does  not  comply  with  a  requirement

imposed by the Review Officer pursuant to clause (a) of subsection (1) within the

time limited for so doing by subsection (2), a judge of the Supreme Court of Nova
Scotia may, on the application of the Review Officer, order the public body to do so.

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

33

APRIL 1, 2018

(4)

In  an  application  made  pursuant  to  subsection  (3),  a  judge

may give such directions as the judge thinks fit, including ordering which persons
shall be parties to the application, which persons shall be given notice of the appli-

cation and the manner in which such notice shall be given.

(5)

An  order  made  pursuant  to  subsection  (3)  may  contain  such

provisions and such terms and conditions as the judge thinks fit.  

1993, c. 5, s. 38; 1999

(2nd Sess.), c. 11, ss. 16, 23.

Duties and powers on completing review

39

(1)

On completing a review, the Review Officer shall
(a)

prepare  a  written  report  setting  out  the  Review

Officer’s recommendations with respect to the matter and the reasons

for those recommendations; and

(b)

send a copy of the report to the head of the public body

and

(i)

where  the  matter  was  referred  to  the  Review

Officer by an applicant, to the applicant and to any third party

notified pursuant to this Act, or

(ii)

where  the  matter  was  referred  to  the  Review

Officer by a third party, to the third party and to the applicant.

(2)

In the report, the Review Officer may make any recommenda-

tions  with  respect  to  the  matter  under  review  that  the  Review  Officer  considers

appropriate.  

1993, c. 5, s. 39; 1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 23.

Duties of head on receipt of report

40

(1)

Within  thirty  days  after  receiving  a  report  of  the  Review

Officer pursuant to subsection (1) of Section 39, the head of the public body shall

(a)

make a decision to follow the recommendation of the

Review Officer or any other decision that the head of the public body
considers appropriate; and

(b)

give  written  notice  of  the  decision  to  the  Review

Officer and the persons who were sent a copy of the report.

(2)

Where the head of the public body does not follow the recom-

mendation  of  the  Review  Officer,  the  head  of  the  public  body  shall,  in  writing,
inform the persons who were sent a copy of the report of the right to appeal the deci-

sion pursuant to clause (a) to the Supreme Court within thirty days of making the

decision.

(3)

Where the head of the public body does not give notice within

the time required by subsection (1), the head of the public body is deemed to have

refused to follow the recommendation of the Review Officer.  

1993, c. 5, s. 40; 1999 (2nd

Sess.), c. 11, s. 23.

background image

34                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

Appeal to Supreme Court

41

(1)

Within thirty days after receiving a decision of the head of a

public body pursuant to Section 40, an applicant or a third party may appeal that

decision to the Supreme Court in such form and manner as may be prescribed by the

Nova Scotia 

Civil Procedure Rules

 or by the regulations.

(1A)

An appeal is deemed not to have been taken pursuant to this

Section unless a notice of appeal is given to the Minister by the person taking the

appeal.

(1B)

Where a notice of appeal is given pursuant to subsection (1A),

the Minister may become a party to the appeal by filing with the prothonotary of the

Supreme Court of Nova Scotia a notice stating that the Minister  is a party  to  the
appeal.

(2)

The  head  of  a  public  body  who  has  refused  a  request  for

access to a record or part of a record shall, immediately on receipt of a notice of

appeal by an applicant, give written notice of the appeal to any third party that the

head of the public body

(a)

has notified pursuant to this Act; or

(b)

would have notified pursuant to this Act if the head of

the public body had intended to give access to the record or part of

the record.

(3)

The  head  of  a  public  body  who  has  granted  a  request  for

access to a record or part of a record shall, immediately on receipt of a notice of

appeal by a third party, give written notice of the appeal to the applicant.

(4)

A third party who has been given notice of an appeal pursuant

to subsection (2) or an applicant who has been given notice of an appeal pursuant to
subsection (3) may appear as a party to the appeal.

(5)

The Review Officer shall not be a party to an appeal.

(6)

Where the head of a public body decides to give access to a

record or a part of a record after the Review Officer files a report setting out the

Review  Officer’s  recommendations  respecting  the  matter,  the  head  shall  not  give

access until the time limited for a third party taking an appeal from the decision to
the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia expires and

(a)

no  appeal  has  been  taken  by  a  third  party  from  the

decision within the time limited for so doing; or

(b)

where an appeal has been taken within that time by a

third party, it has subsequently been abandoned or withdrawn,

but, where an appeal is taken by a third party, the head shall not give access until

either the decision of the head is upheld by an order of the Supreme Court and the
order becomes final by lapse of time or the decision of the head is upheld by the

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

35

APRIL 1, 2018

highest authority to which any further appeal or appeals are taken.  

1993, c. 5, s. 41;

1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, ss. 17, 23

.

Powers of Supreme Court

42

(1)

On an appeal, the Supreme Court may 
(a)

determine the matter 

de novo

; and

(b)

examine any record 

in camera

 in order to determine on

the  merits  whether  the  information  in  the  record  may  be  withheld
pursuant to this Act.

(2)

Notwithstanding any other Act or any privilege that is availa-

ble at law, the Supreme Court may, on an appeal, examine any record in the custody

or under the control of a public body, and no information shall be withheld from the

Supreme Court on any grounds.

(3)

The  Supreme  Court  shall  take  every  reasonable  precaution,

including,  where  appropriate,  receiving  representations 

ex parte

  and  conducting

hearings 

in camera

, to avoid disclosure by the Supreme Court or any person of

(a)

any  information  or  other  material  if  the  nature  of  the

information or material could justify a refusal by a head of the public
body to give access to a record or part of a record; or

(b)

any  information  as  to  whether  a  record  exists  if  the

head of the public body, in refusing to give access, does not indicate

whether the record exists.

(4)

The Supreme Court may disclose to the Minister or the Attor-

ney General of Canada information that may relate to the commission of an offence
pursuant to another enactment by an officer or employee of a public body.

(5)

Where the head of the public body has refused to give access

to a record or part of it, the Supreme Court, if it determines that the head of the pub-

lic body is not authorized to refuse to give access to the record or part of it, shall

(a)

order the head of the public body to give the applicant

access  to the record  or  part  of  it,  subject  to  any  conditions  that  the

Supreme Court considers appropriate; or

(b)

make any other order that the Supreme Court considers

appropriate.

(6)

Where the Supreme Court finds that a record falls within an

exemption, the Supreme Court shall not order the head of the public body to give
the applicant access to the record, regardless of whether the exemption requires or

merely authorizes the head of the public body to refuse to give access to the record.

1993, c. 5, s. 42

.

background image

36                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

GENERAL

Exercise of right or power

43

Any  right  or  power  conferred  on  an  individual  by  this Act  may  be

exercised

(a)

where the individual is deceased, by the individual’s personal

representative if the exercise of the right or power relates to the administra-

tion of the individual’s estate;

(b)

where  a  personal  guardian  or  property  guardian  has  been

appointed for the individual, by the guardian if the exercise of the right or
power relates to the powers and duties of the guardian;

(c)

where a power of attorney has been granted, by the attorney if

the  exercise  of  the  right  or  power  relates  to  the  powers  and  duties  of  the

attorney conferred by the power of attorney;

(d)

where  the  individual  is  less  than  the  age  of  majority,  by  the

individual’s legal custodian in situations where, in the opinion of the head of

a  public  body,  the  exercise  of  the  right  or  power  would  not  constitute  an

unreasonable invasion of the privacy of the individual; or

(e)

by a person with written authorization from the individual to

act on the individual’s behalf.  

1993, c. 5, s. 43

.

Delegation of powers by head of public body

44

(1)

The  head  of  a  public  body  may  delegate  to  one  or  more

officers of the public body a power granted to the head of the public body or a duty

vested in the head of the public body.

(2)

A delegation pursuant to subsection (1)
(a)

shall be in writing; and

(b)

may contain any limitations, restrictions, conditions or

requirements that the head of the public body considers necessary or

advisable.  

1993, c. 5, s. 44

.

Burden of proof

45

(1)

At  a  review  or  appeal  into  a  decision  to  refuse  an  applicant

access to all or part of a record, the burden is on the head of a public body to prove

that the applicant has no right of access to the record or part.

(2)

Where the record or part that the applicant is refused access to

contains personal information about a third party, the burden is on the applicant to

prove that disclosure of the information would not be an unreasonable invasion of
the third party’s personal privacy.

(3)

At  a  review  or  appeal  into  a  decision  to  give  an  applicant

access to all or part of a record containing information that relates to a third party,

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

37

APRIL 1, 2018

(a)

in  the  case  of  personal  information,  the  burden  is  on

the applicant to prove that disclosure of the information would not be
an unreasonable invasion of the third party’s personal privacy; and

(b)

in  any  other  case,  the  burden  is  on  the  third  party  to

prove that the applicant has no right of access to the record or part.

1993, c. 5, s. 45

.

Limitation of liability

46

(1)

No action or other proceeding lies against the head of a public

body or any person acting on behalf of or under the direction of the head of the pub-
lic body for damages resulting from

(a)

the  disclosure  in  good  faith  of  all  or  part  of  a  record

pursuant to this Act or any consequences of that disclosure; or

(b)

the failure to give any notice required pursuant to this

Act if reasonable care is taken to give the required notice.

(2)

Subsection  (1)  does  not  absolve  Her  Majesty  in  right  of  the

Province or a public body from vicarious liability for an act or omission for which it
would be vicariously liable if this Section were not in force.  

1993, c. 5, s. 46.

Offence and penalty

47

(1)

Every  person  who  maliciously  collects  or  discloses  personal

information in contravention of this Act or the regulations is guilty of an offence

and liable on summary conviction to a fine of not more than two thousand dollars or

to imprisonment for six months, or both.

(1A)

Every person who knowingly alters a record that is subject to

a request in order to mislead the person who made the request is guilty of an offence

and liable on summary conviction to a fine of not more than two thousand dollars or

to imprisonment for six months, or both.

(2)

Section 4 of the 

Summary Proceedings Act

 does not apply to

this Act.  

1993, c. 5, s. 47; 1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 18

.

Directory respecting records of public bodies

48

(1)

The Minister shall publish a directory to assist in identifying

and locating records of public bodies.

(2)

The directory shall include
(a)

a  description  of  the  mandate  and  functions  of  each

public body and its components;

(b)

a description and list of the records in the custody or

under the control of each public body;

(c)

a subject index; and

background image

38                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

(d)

the  name,  title,  business  address  and  business  tele-

phone number of the head of the public body.

(3)

The  directory  shall  include  for  each  personal-information

bank maintained by a public body

(a)

its title and location;

(b)

a  description of  the  kind  of personal information  and

the categories of individuals whose personal information is included;

(c)

the authority for collecting the personal information;

(d)

the  purposes  for  which  the  personal  information  was

obtained  or  compiled  and  the  purposes  for  which  it  is  used  or  dis-
closed;

(e)

the  categories  of  persons who  use the  personal  infor-

mation or to whom it is disclosed.

(4)

Where personal information is used or disclosed by a public

body for a purpose that is not included in the directory published pursuant to sub-

section (1), the head of the public body shall

(a)

keep a record of the purpose and either attach or link

the record to the personal information;

(b)

promptly notify the Minister of the purpose; and

(c)

ensure that the purpose is included in the next publica-

tion of the directory.

(5)

The Minister shall

(a)

provide copies of the directory to public bodies and to

public libraries and other prescribed libraries in the Province; and

(b)

publish and distribute, at intervals of two years or less,

supplements or replacements to keep the directory up to date.

(6)

The head of a public body shall ensure that copies provided

pursuant to subsection (5) are available to the public at an office of the public body.

(7)

This Section applies to such public bodies as are prescribed by

the regulations.  

1993, c. 5, s. 48

.

Regulations

49

(1)

The Governor in Council may make regulations
(a)

prescribing procedures to be followed in taking, trans-

ferring and processing requests for access;

(b)

prescribing or limiting fees to be paid pursuant to this

Act;

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

39

APRIL 1, 2018

(c)

prescribing  additional  circumstances  in  which  a  head

of the public body may waive the payment of all or any part of a pre-
scribed fee;

(d)

prescribing, for the purpose of Section 19, the catego-

ries  of  sites  that  are  considered  to  have  heritage  or  anthropological

value;

(e)

prescribing requirements to be met with respect to dis-

closures of information to law enforcement agencies or investigative

bodies;

(f)

designating
(i)

any  agency,  association,  board,  commission,

corporation, office, society or other body

(A)

any  member  of  which  is  appointed  by

the Governor in Council or a minister,

(B)

a controlling interest in the share capital

of which is owned by Her Majesty in right of the Prov-

ince or any of its agencies, or

(C)

that  performs  functions  pursuant  to  an

enactment,
(ii) to (iv)

repealed 1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 18.

as a public body;

(g)

designating a person as the head of a public body;

(h)

modifying any provision of this Act in respect of a pub-

lic body or class of public bodies designated pursuant to clause (f);

(i)

prescribing the form and manner of a review pursuant

to this Act;

(j)

prescribing the form and manner of an appeal pursuant

to this Act;

(k)

prescribing any matter that is to be included in a notice

that is required by this Act;

(ka)

amending the Schedule to this Act to the extent permit-

ted by subsection (1) of Section 3A;

(kb)

amending  subsection  (2)  of  Section  4A  to  the  extent

permitted by subsection (3) of that Section;

(kc)

designating  an  executed  contract  as  a  public-private

partnership or a class of executed contracts as a class of public-private

partnerships for the purpose of subsection (2A) of Section 5;

(kd)

providing  that  clause  (b)  of  subsection  (1A)  of  Sec-

tion 22 applies;

background image

40                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

(ke)

prescribing time limits for the purpose of subsection (2)

of Section 38;

(l)

prescribing forms for the purpose of this Act;

(m)

prescribing  any  other  matter  or  thing  required  or

authorized by this Act to be prescribed in the regulations;

(n)

for any purpose contemplated by this Act;

(o)

defining any word or expression used but not defined

in this Act;

(p)

enlarging  or  restricting  the  meaning  of  any  word  or

expression defined in this Act;

(q)

to carry  out effectively  the intent and purpose of this

Act.

(2)

No designation shall be made pursuant to clause (f) of subsec-

tion  (1)  until  after  the  submission  of  the  report  pursuant  to  Section  50  unless

requested by the body being designated.

(3)

Clause (f) of subsection (1) and subsection (2) do not restrict

the meaning of public body as contained in subclause (i) of clause (j) of Section 3.

(4)

A regulation may apply to all persons or bodies or to a class of

persons or bodies to whom this Act applies and there may be different regulations

for different classes of such persons or bodies.

(5)

The exercise by the Governor in Council of the authority con-

tained  in  this  Section  shall  be  regulations  within  the  meaning  of  the 

Regulations

Act

.  

1993, c. 5, s. 49; 1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 19

.

Duty to designate head

49A

A  local  public  body  shall,  by  by-law  or  other  legal  instrument  by

which the local public body acts, designate a person or group of persons as the head

of the local public body for the purpose of this Act.  

1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 20

.

Review of Act

50

Before  the  expiration  of  three  years  after  this  Section  comes  into

force, the Minister shall appoint an advisory committee which shall begin a compre-
hensive review of this Act within one year after its appointment and shall submit to

the Governor in Council a report that includes any amendments recommended by

the committee and any designations pursuant to clause (f) of subsection (1) of Sec-
tion 49 recommended by the committee.  

1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 21

.

Repeal

51

Chapter 11 of the Acts of 1990, the 

Freedom of Information Act

, is

repealed.  

1993, c. 5, s. 51.

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

41

APRIL 1, 2018

Effective date

52

This Act  comes  into  force  on  and  not  before  the  first  day  of  July,

1994, or such earlier day as the Governor in Council orders and declares by procla-

mation.  

1993, c. 5, s. 52.

No proclamation

In force

-

July 1, 1994

SCHEDULE

Agriculture and Marketing

Apple Maggot Control Board

Artificial Insemination Advisory Board

Crop and Livestock Arbitration Board

Crop Development Institute

Dairy Industry Advisory Committee

Deer Farming Advisory Committee

Farm Machinery Advisory Committee

Farm Management Institute

Farm Registration Advisory Committee

Farm Registration Appeal Committee

Farm Skills Advisory Committee

Fur Institute

a livestock health services board established pursuant to the 

Livestock Health Services Act

Marshland Reclamation Commission

Meat Inspection Board

Natural Products Marketing Council

Nova Scotia Beef Commission

Nova Scotia Crop and Livestock Insurance Commission

Nova Scotia Dairy Commission

Nova Scotia Farm Loan Board

Nova Scotia Grain and Forage Commission

Soil Institute

Weed Control Advisory Committee

Wild Blueberry Institute

Business and Consumer Services

Board of Embalmers and Funeral Directors

Nova Scotia Credit Union Deposit Insurance Corporation
Public Accountants Board of the Province of Nova Scotia

Community Services

an agency within the meaning of the 

Children and Family Services Act

Economic Development

Bedford Waterfront Development Corporation Limited

Business Development Corporation
InNOVACorp.
Nova Scotia Film Development Corporation

Nova Scotia Voluntary Planning Board
Trade Centre Limited
Trade Council of Nova Scotia
Waterfront Development Corporation Limited

background image

42                    freedom of information and protection of privacy

1993, c. 5

APRIL 1, 2018

Education

Johnstone (Dr. P. Anthony) Memorial Fund Entrance Scholarship
a university foundation established by the 

University Foundations Act

Youth Advisory Council

Environment

Nova Scotia Youth Secretariat
On-site Services Advisory Board
Radiation Health Advisory Board

Finance

Halifax-Dartmouth Bridge Commission
Nova Scotia Gaming Corporation

Nova Scotia Power Finance Corporation
Teachers Pension Board

Fisheries and Aquaculture

Nova Scotia Fisheries and Aquaculture Loan Board

Health

Advisory Commission on AIDS

Board of Dispensing Opticians
Cape Breton Health Care Complex
Denturist Licensing Board

Facilities Review Board under the 

Hospitals Act

Health Services and Insurance Commission
Minister’s Substance Abuse Advisory Board

Seniors’ Pharmacare Program Board of Directors

Housing and Municipal Affairs

a housing authority created under the 

Housing Act

Housing Development Corporation
Municipal Finance Corporation

Human Resources

Civil Service Employee Relations Board
Long-Term Disability Trust Fund Board
Public Sector Compensation Restraint Board

Justice

Nova Scotia Legal Aid Commission

Labour

Board of Examiners appointed pursuant to the 

Stationary Engineers Act

Board of Examiners for the Certification of Blasters
Board of Examiners of Mining Examinations

background image

1993, c. 5            freedom of information and protection of privacy

43

APRIL 1, 2018

Construction Industry Panel of the Labour Relations Board (Nova Scotia)

Fire Prevention Advisory Council
LP Gas Board of Examiners
Labour Relations Board
Labour Standards Tribunal (Nova Scotia)

an appeal panel designated pursuant to the 

Occupational Health and Safety Act

Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Council
Pay Equity Commission

Natural Resources

Board of Examiners appointed pursuant to the 

Scalers Act

Natural Resources Advisory Council

Primary Forest Products Marketing Board
Species-at-Risk Working Group

Premier’s Office

Election Commission

Tourism and Culture

Gaelic College Foundation

N.S. International Tattoo Society
Nova Scotia Arts Council
Peggy’s Cove Commission

Schooner Bluenose Corporation
Shubenacadie Canal Commission
Upper Clements Theme Park Board

Transportation and Public Works

Halifax-Dartmouth Port Development Commission
Sydney Environmental Resources Limited

Sydney Harbour Port Regional Development Commission

1999 (2nd Sess.), c. 11, s. 22; N.S. Reg. 205/2009, s. 2; 2011, c. 67, s. 11; 2014, c. 32, s. 116.

__________


Document Outline