Etymology
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vision (n.)

c. 1300, "something seen in the imagination or in the supernatural," from Anglo-French visioun, Old French vision "presence, sight; view, look, appearance; dream, supernatural sight" (12c.), from Latin visionem (nominative visio) "act of seeing, sight, thing seen," noun of action from past participle stem of videre "to see," from PIE root *weid- "to see." The meaning "sense of sight" is first recorded late 15c. Meaning "statesman-like foresight, political sagacity" is attested from 1926.

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Definitions of vision

vision (n.)
a vivid mental image;
he had a vision of his own death
vision (n.)
the ability to see; the visual faculty;
Synonyms: sight / visual sense / visual modality
vision (n.)
the perceptual experience of seeing;
the runners emerged from the trees into his clear vision
Synonyms: visual sensation
vision (n.)
the formation of a mental image of something that is not perceived as real and is not present to the senses;
Synonyms: imagination / imaginativeness
vision (n.)
a religious or mystical experience of a supernatural appearance;
he had a vision of the Virgin Mary
From wordnet.princeton.edu