THE KOREA SOCIETY

is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, 501(c)(3) organization with individual and corporate members that is dedicated solely to the promotion of greater awareness, understanding, and cooperation between the people of the United States and Korea. Learn more about us here.

Journals and Book Reviews

Contributions by the Korea Society team in academic and policy journals.

 

 

12/2021

Next Generation Perspectives on Korean Peninsula Security

Korea Society policy director Jonathan Corrado writes about "Strengthening US-South Korea Cooperation on Semiconductor Supply Chain Resilience and Innovation" for an edited volume of the Emerging Leaders' policy papers on Next Generation Perspectives on Korean Peninsula Security published by The National Committee on American Foreign Policy (NCAFP).

The volume is available here.

 


7/14/2021

Rethinking Intelligence Failure: China’s Intervention in the Korean War

Policy Director Jonathan Corrado published an article titled "Rethinking Intelligence Failure: China’s Intervention in the Korean War" in The International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence. The article evaluates how the U.S. Intelligence Community and policymakers failed to predict and prepare for China’s entrance into the Korean War and North Korea’s invasion. Diplomatic cables, personal accounts, and declassified national security documents reveal that warnings about possible intervention were undercut by contradicting analysis. Cognitive bias led to faulty assumptions and ambiguous conclusions. The negative effects of bias and politicization were mutually reinforcing, imperiling the efforts of actors who tried in vain to address them. Lessons gleaned from this history shed light on insights for persistent security challenges, such as the relationship between miscalculation and escalation and the difficulty of knowing one’s adversary, as well as America’s present strategic competition with China.

The article is available here.

 


4/2021

Partners in Democracy: Perspectives on the U.S.-Korea Alliance

The Korea Society and The Association of Former Members of Congress (FMC) are proud to release a new publication Partners in Democracy: Perspectives on the U.S.-Korea Alliance.

This series of essays sheds light on the dynamic partnership between the United States and the Republic of Korea, featuring insights from: Republic of Korea Ambassador to the United States Lee Soo-Hyuck; U.S. Senator Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii); Senator Dan Sullivan (R-Alaska); Representative Ami Bera (D-Calif.); Korea Foundation President Geun Lee; former U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea Kathleen Stephens; General Walter “Skip” Sharp, former Commander, United Nations Command / Combined Forces Command / United States Forces Korea; and Professor Victor Cha, CSIS Korea Chair.

On the significance of the publication, Korea Society president and CEO Tom Byrne said: "By showcasing influential voices from the United States and Korea, this timely series of essays demonstrates the many mutually beneficial aspects of the U.S.-ROK relationship, and outlines the key challenges and opportunities for our partnership going forward. We are confident that it will serve as a helpful tool for policymakers and stakeholders. The Korea Society is proud of its collaboration with FMC on the Congressional Study Group on Korea and looks forward to participating in an even more ambitious agenda in the future."

Click here to read.

To download the article as PDF, click here

 


1/2020

Gaps Widen, Tensions Rise

By Stephen Noerper

US footing on the Korean Peninsula grew less firm as both Koreas resisted moves by Washington. The initial White House call for an increase in annual South Korean host-nation support (HNS) for US Forces in Korea to $5 billion was met with incredulity among the Republic of Korea’s officials and public. By yearend, there were media reports of a lowering of the US ask and agreement by Seoul to arms purchases, but the challenge of finalizing the Special Measures Agreement (SMA) and a residue of resentment remained. Seoul, too, was unhappy with Washington’s lack of progress with Pyongyang, a foil to President Moon Jae-in’s peace ambitions.

North Korea raised its stakes higher, rejecting diplomatic overtures by the United States and its “hostile policy,” disregarding curtailment of US-ROK military exercises, and testing 27 short range ballistic missiles, as well as multiple rocket launchers and engines, between May and the end of the year. December saw activity at the once-decommissioned Sohae Launch Facility. At year’s close, Kim Jong Un declared abandonment of North Korea’s long-range missile and nuclear testing moratorium, expectations of continued sanctions and renewed “self-reliance,” and the promise of a “new strategic weapon.”

To read the full article, click here

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7/2/19
National Committee on American Foreign Policy

A TICKING CLOCK OR A GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY? A U.S.-ROK-CHINA TRILATERAL REPORT

A new report written by Korea Society associate policy director Jonathan Corrado for the National Committee on American Foreign Policy highlights a conference discussion on prospects for trilateral and broader multilateral cooperation in addressing Northeast Asian security challenges. The trilateral conference, co-hosted by The Korea Society, provides a useful opportunity to evaluate the year’s most significant geopolitical developments. Stark differences in the tone and content of this year’s dialogue underscore the region’s dynamism and strategic significance. Denuclearizing North Korea remains the major driver of concern. Conference participants explored the ramifications and likelihood of alternate futures, ranging from breakthrough to muddle through to breakdown. Participants also discussed the possibility of North Korean change from within, the opportunity for China to play a greater role in denuclearization talks, methods for preventing an arms race in Northeast Asia, and the future structure of the U.S.-ROK alliance.

To read the full article, click here

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5/19
From Hanoi to Hiatus - Comparative Connections

Stephen Noerper writes on the latest developments in US-Korea relations in Comparative Connections:

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1/19
Patience, Tack and Impasse - Comparative Connections

Stephen Noerper writes on the latest developments in US-Korea relations in Comparative Connections:

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9/18
Comparative Connections

Stephen Noerper writes on the latest developments in US-Korea relations in Comparative Connections:

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6/8/18
CSIS | Center for Strategic & International Studies

PacNet #39 - Rapid Denuclearization Made Economic Sense for Libya – and Could for North Korea, Too

The big question is, will Kim Jong Un pivot North Korea towards an economic development track and away from its heavy emphasis on military expenditures?  A good test of that would be whether North Korea follows the Libya model.  President Donald Trump called off – briefly – 

To read the full article, click here | To download the article in PDF, click here


5/18
Comparative Connections

Stephen Noerper write on the latest developments in US-Korea relations in An Olympic Detente in Comparative Connections:

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4/5/18  
Political Science Quarterly. Spring 2018
 
Korea Society Senior Director Dr. Stephen Noerper provides a historical and comparative analysis of North Korea and the World: Human Rights, Arms Control, and Strategies for Negotiation by Walter C. Clemens Jr. Lexington for Political Science Quarterly. Says Noerper, " Clemens weighs fully the policy dilemma of negotiating with the most unsavory of interlocutors, and from this point onward, he lays out the experiences, lessons learned, and remaining hope for dialogue."

To view the quarterly in PDF, click here


1/18/18
Comparative Connections

by Stephen Noerper

Tensions, Tests, and Drift

North Korea’s sixth nuclear test on Sept. 3 and its Nov. 29 ICBM test launch were unfortunate bookends to increased tension between North Korea and the US in the closing months of 2017. The missile test, which Kim Jong Un hailed as “completing the state nuclear force...”

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1/10/18
CSIS | Center for Strategic & International Studies

PacNet #3 - Kim Jong Un’s New Year’s Resolution: What It Means

Korea Society President Tom Byrne explains why Kim Jong Un is suddenly warming up to South Korea after giving the Moon administration the cold shoulder for much of 2017. The New Year’s Day gambit is a play to get $ relief and drive a wedge in US-ROK denuclearization policy.

To read the full article, click here | To download the article in PDF, click here


11/3-5/17

Beijing Forum

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November 3-5, 2017  -- Tom Byrne presented at the Beijing Forum held at Peking University on the topic of the "Belt Road Initiative and Global Economic Governance." The Beijing Forum, co-hosted by the Korea Foundation for Advanced Studies and Peking University since 2004 is an annual academic conference. This year it was held on 3-5 November this year over a three-day period at Diaoyutai State Guest House and Peking University in Beijing, China.