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BLOOD DONATION ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES

Note to users: This list is not complete. Medical professionals are available at each blood collection center and details of each donor's health and activities are discussed in a confidential setting prior to blood donation. The final determination of eligibility is made at that time. Some donor eligibility rules are specified by the Food and Drug Administration for every blood bank in the country. Other rules are determined by the particular blood bank and may differ between programs. Donor eligibility rules are intended to protect the health and safety of the donor as well as the patient who will receive the transfusion. The criteria listed below are provided as guidelines to assist you in determining whether you may be eligible to be a blood donor. The guidelines listed below were last revised on 5/24/07. There may have been some changes to these criteria since the last revision date. The most up to date eligibility information can be obtained by contacting the American Red Cross blood center nearest you.

GENERAL GUIDELINES
To give blood for transfusion to another person, you must be healthy, be at least 17 years old or 16 years old if allowed by state law, weigh at least 110 pounds, and not have donated blood in the last 8 weeks (56 days) or a donation of double red cells in the last 16 weeks (111 days). "Healthy" means that you feel well and can perform normal activities. If you have a chronic condition such as diabetes or high blood pressure, "healthy" also means that you are being treated and the condition is under control.

Other aspects of each potential donor's health history are discussed as part of the donation process before any blood is collected. Each donor receives a brief examination during which temperature, pulse, blood pressure and blood count (hemoglobin or hematocrit) are measured.

Making donations for your own use during surgery (autologous blood donation) is considered a medical procedure and the rules for eligibility are less strict than for regular volunteer donations.

Acupuncture
Age
Allergy, Stuffy Nose, Itchy Eyes, Dry Cough
Antibiotics
Aspirin
Asthma
Birth Control
Bleeding Disorders
Blood Pressure, High
Blood Pressure, Low
Blood Transfusion
Cancer
Chronic Illnesses
Cold, Flu
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD)
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, Variant (vCJD);"Mad Cow Disease"
Dental Procedures
Donation Intervals
Heart Disease
Heart Murmur, Heart Valve Disorder
Hemochromatosis
Hemoglobin, Hematocrit, Blood Count

Hepatitis, Jaundice
Hepatitis Exposure
Herpes (see Sexually Transmitted Disease)
HIV, AIDS
Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRP)
HPV (see Sexually Transmitted Disease)
HPV vaccine (see Immunization, Vaccination)
Hypertension, High Blood Pressure
Immunization, Vaccination
Infections
Insulin (bovine)
Intravenous Drug Use
Malaria
Medications
Organ/Tissue Transplants
Piercing (ears, body), Electrolysis
Pregnancy, Nursing
Sexually Transmitted Disease
Sickle Cell
Syphilis/Gonorrhea
Tattoo
Tuberculosis
Travel Outside of U.S., Immigration
Vaccinations
Venereal Diseases
Weight

Acupuncture
Donors who have undergone acupuncture treatments are acceptable.

Age
You must be at least 17 years old to donate to the general blood supply, or 16 years old if allowed by state law. Learn more about the reasons for a lower age limit. There is no upper age limit for blood donation as long as you are well with no restrictions or limitations to your activities.

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Allergy, Stuffy Nose, Itchy Eyes, Dry Cough
Acceptable as long as you feel well, have no fever, and have no problems breathing through your mouth

Antibiotics
A donor with an infection should not donate. The reason for antibiotic use must be evaluated to determine if the donor has a bacterial infection that could be transmissible by blood.

Acceptable after finishing oral antibiotics for an infection (bacterial or viral). Acceptable 7 days after an antibiotic injection for an infection. Acceptable if you are taking antibiotics to prevent an infection, for example, following dental procedures or for acne. Antibiotics for acne do not disqualify you from donating. If you have a temperature above 99.5 F, you may not donate.

Aspirin
See "Medications"

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Asthma
Acceptable as long as you are not having difficulty breathing at the time of donation and you otherwise feel well. Medications for asthma do not disqualify you from donating.

Birth Control
Women taking birth control (pills or injections) are acceptable.

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Blood Pressure, High
Acceptable as long as your blood pressure is below 180 systolic (first number) and below 100 diastolic (second number) at the time of donation. Medications for high blood pressure do not disqualify you from donating.

Blood Pressure, Low
Acceptable as long as you feel well when you come to donate. If your blood pressure normally runs low, it may be more difficult for your body to adjust to the volume loss following donation, especially if you are dehydrated. Drinking extra water before and after donation is important.

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Blood Transfusion
Wait for 12 months after receiving a blood transfusion from another person in the United States.

You may not donate if you received a blood transfusion since 1980 in the United Kingdom (England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Channel Islands, Isle of Man, Gibraltar or Falkland Islands). This requirement is related to concerns about variant CJD, or 'mad cow' disease. Learn more about variant CJD and blood donation.

You may not donate if you received a blood transfusion in certain countries in Africa since 1977. This requirement is related to concerns about rare strains of HIV that are not consistently detected by all current test methods. Learn more about HIV Group O, and the specific African countries where it is found.

Cancer
Eligibility depends on the type of cancer and treatment history. If you had leukemia or lymphoma, including Hodgkin’s Disease and other cancers of the blood, you are not eligible to donate. Other types of cancer are acceptable if the cancer has been treated successfully and it has been at least 5 years since treatment was completed and there has been no cancer recurrence in this time. Some low-risk cancers including squamous or basal cell cancers of the skin do not require a 5 year waiting period.

Precancerous conditions of the uterine cervix do not disqualify you from donation if the abnormality has been treated successfully. You should discuss your particular situation with the health historian at the time of donation.

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Chronic Illnesses
Most chronic illnesses are acceptable as long as you feel well, the condition is under good control, you have an adequate hemoglobin level and your temperature is normal when you come to donate, and you meet all other eligibility requirements.

Bleeding Condition
If you have a history of bleeding problems, you will be asked additional questions. If your blood does not clot normally, you should not donate since you may have excessive bleeding where the needle was placed. For the same reason, if you are taking any "blood thinner" (such as coumadin or heparin) you should not donate. If you are on aspirin, it is OK to donate blood. However, you must be off of aspirin for at least 48 hours in order donate platelets by apheresis.

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Cold, Flu
Wait if you have a fever or a productive cough (bringing up phlegm)
Wait if you do not feel well on the day of donation.
Wait until you have completed antibiotic treatment for sinus, throat or lung infection.

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD)
If you ever received a dura mater (brain covering) transplant or human pituitary growth hormone, you are not eligible to donate. Those who have a blood relative who had Creutzfeld-Jacob disease are also not eligible to donate. Learn more about CJD.

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Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, Variant (vCJD); "Mad Cow Disease"
See under Travel Outside of U.S. Learn more about vCJD and blood donation.

Dental Procedures and Oral Surgery
Acceptable after dental procedures as long as there is no infection present. Wait until finishing antibiotics for a dental infection. Wait for 3 days after having oral surgery.

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Insulin
Those who since 1980, received an injection of bovine (beef) insulin made from cattle from the United Kingdom are not eligible to donate. This requirement is related to concerns about variant CJD, or 'mad cow' disease. Learn more about variant CJD and blood donation.

Donation Intervals
Wait at least 8 weeks between whole blood (standard) donations.
Wait at least 3 days between plateletpheresis donations.
Wait at least 16 weeks between double red cell (automated) donations.

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Heart Disease
In general , acceptable as long as you have been medically evaluated and treated, have no current (within the last 6 months) heart related symptoms such as chest pain and have no limitations or restrictions on your normal daily activities.
Wait at least 6 months following an episode of angina.
Wait at least 6 months following a heart attack.
Wait at least 6 months after bypass surgery or angioplasty.
If you have a pacemaker, you may donate as long as your pulse is between 50 and 100 beats per minute with no more than a small number of irregular beats, and you meet the other heart disease criteria. You should discuss your particular situation with the health historian at the time of donation.

Heart Murmur, Heart Valve Disorder
Acceptable if you have a heart murmur as long as you have been medically evaluated and treated and have not had symptoms in the last 6 months, and have no restrictions on your normal daily activities.

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Hemochromatosis (Hereditary)
American Red Cross does not accept individuals with hemochromatosis as blood donors for other persons at this time. However, a pilot program for hemochromatosis donors has been completed and is being evaluated for possible system wide implementation.

Hemoglobin, Hematocrit, Blood Count
Acceptable if you have a hemoglobin at or above 12.5 g/dL.
Acceptable if you have a hematocrit at or above 38%.

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Hepatitis, Jaundice
If you had hepatitis (inflammation of the liver) caused by a virus, or unexplained jaundice (yellow discoloration of the skin), since age 11, you are not eligible to donate blood. This includes those who had hepatitis with Cytomegalovirus (CMV), or Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), the virus that causes Mononucleosis.

Acceptable if you had jaundice or hepatitis caused by something other than a viral infection, for example: medications, Gilbert's disease, bile duct obstruction, alcohol, gallstones or trauma to the liver. If you ever tested positive for hepatitis B or hepatitis C , at any age, you are not eligible to donate, even if you were never sick or jaundiced from the infection.

Hepatitis Exposure
If you live with or have had sexual contact with a person who has hepatitis, you must wait 12 months after the last contact.
Persons who have been detained or incarcerated in a facility (juvenile detention, lockup, jail, or prison) for more than 72 consecutive hours (3 days) are deferred for 12 months from the date of last occurrence. This includes work release programs and weekend incarceration. These persons are at higher risk for exposure to infectious diseases.
Wait 12 months after receiving a blood transfusion (unless it was your own "autologous" blood), non-sterile needle stick/body piercing or exposure to someone else's blood.
Wait 12 months following a human bite, if it broke the skin.

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HIV, AIDS
You should not give blood if you have AIDS or have ever had a positive HIV test, or if you have done something that puts you at risk for becoming infected with HIV.

You are at risk for getting infected if you:

  • have ever used needles to take drugs, steroids, or anything not prescribed by your doctor
  • are a male who has had sexual contact with another male, even once, since 1977
  • have ever taken money, drugs or other payment for sex since 1977
  • have had sexual contact in the past 12 months with anyone described above
  • received clotting factor concentrates for a bleeding disorder such as hemophilia
  • were born in, or lived in, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Equatorial Guinea,Gabon, Niger, or Nigeria, since 1977.
  • since 1977, received a blood transfusion or medical treatment with a blood product in any of these countries, or
  • had sex with anyone who, since 1977, was born in or lived in any of these countries. Learn more about HIV Group O, and the specific African countries where it is found.
You should not give blood if you have any of the following conditions that can be signs or symptoms of HIV/AIDS
  • unexplained weight loss (10 pounds or more in less than 2 months)
  • night sweats
  • blue or purple spots in your mouth or skin
  • white spots or unusual sores in your mouth
  • lumps in your neck, armpits, or groin, lasting longer than one month
  • diarrhea that won’t go away
  • cough that won’t go away and shortness of breath, or
  • fever higher than 100.5 F lasting more than 10 days.

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Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)
Women on hormone replacement therapy for menopausal symptoms and prevention of osteoporosis are eligible to donate.

Hypertension, High Blood Pressure
See "Blood Pressure, High"

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Immunization, Vaccination
Acceptable if you were vaccinated for influenza, tetanus or meningitis, providing you are symptom-free and fever-free.
Acceptable if you received an HPV Vaccine (example, Gardasil).
Wait 4 weeks after immunizations for German Measles (Rubella), MMR (Measles, Mumps and Rubella), Chicken Pox and Shingles.
Wait 2 weeks after immunizations for Red Measles (Rubeola), Mumps, Polio (by mouth), and Yellow Fever vaccine.
Wait 7 days after immunization for Hepatitis B as long as you are not given the immunization for exposure to hepatitis B.

  • Smallpox vaccination and did not develop complications
    Wait 8 weeks (56 days) from the date of having a smallpox vaccination as long as you have had no complications. Complications may include skin reactions beyond the vaccination site or general illness related to the vaccination.
  • Smallpox vaccination and developed complications
    Wait 14 days after all vaccine complications have resolved or 8 weeks (56 days) from the date of having had the smallpox vaccination whichever is the longer period of time. You should discuss your particular situation with the health historian at the time of donation. Complications may include skin reactions beyond the vaccination site or general illness related to the vaccination.
  • Smallpox vaccination – close contact with someone who has had the smallpox vaccine in the last eight weeks and you did not develop any skin lesions or other symptoms.
    Eligible to donate.
  • Smallpox vaccination – close contact with someone who has had the vaccine in the last eight weeks and you have since a developed skin lesions or symptoms.
    Wait 8 weeks (56 days) from the date of the first skin lesion or sore. You should discuss your particular situation with the health historian at the time of donation. Complications may include skin reactions or general illness related to the exposure.

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Infections
If you have a fever or an active infection, wait until the infection has resolved completely before donating blood.

Wait until finished taking antibiotics for an infection (bacterial or viral). Wait until 7 days after an antibiotic injection for an infection.

Those who have had infections with Chagas Disease or babesiosis are not eligible to donate.

See also Antibiotics, Hepatitis, HIV, Syphilis/Gonorrhea, and Tuberculosis.

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Intravenous Drug Use
Those who have ever used IV drugs that were not prescribed by a physician are not eligible to donate. This requirement is related to concerns about hepatitis and HIV. Learn more about hepatitis and blood donation.

Malaria
Wait 3 years after completing treatment for malaria. Wait 12 months after returning from a trip to an area where malaria is found. Wait 3 years after living in a country or countries where malaria is found. Learn more about malaria and blood donation.

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Medications
In almost all cases, medications will not disqualify you as a blood donor. Your eligibility will be based on the reason that the medication was prescribed. As long as the condition is under control and you are healthy, blood donation is usually permitted.

Over-the-counter oral homeopathic medications, herbal remedies, and nutritional supplements are acceptable.

There are a handful of drugs that are of special significance in blood donation. Persons on these drugs have waiting periods following their last dose before they can donate blood:

  • Accutane, Amnesteem, Claravis or Sotret (isoretinoin), Proscar (finasteride), and Propecia (finasteride) - wait 1 month from the last dose.
  • Avodart (dutasteride) - wait 6 months from the last dose.
  • Aspirin, no waiting period for donating blood. However you must wait 48 hours after taking aspirin or any medication containing aspirin before donating platelets by apheresis.
  • Clopidogrel - wait 7 days after taking this medication before donating platelets by apheresis.
  • Coumadin (warfarin) , heparin or other prescription blood thinners- you should not donate since your blood will not clot normally. If your doctor discontinues your treatment with blood thinners, wait 7 days before returning to donate.
  • Hepatitis B Immune Globulin – given for exposure to hepatitis, wait 12 months after exposure to hepatitis.
  • Human pituitary-derived growth hormone at any time - you are not eligible to donate blood.
  • Plavix - wait 7 days after taking this medication before donating platelets by apheresis.
  • Soriatane (acitretin) - wait 3 years.
  • Tegison (etretinate) at any time - you are not eligible to donate blood.
  • Ticlid - wait 7 days after taking this medication before donating platelets by apheresis.
  • Ticlopidine - wait 7 days after taking this medication before donating platelets by apheresis.

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Organ/Tissue Transplants
Wait 12 months after receiving a Kidney transplant or tissue transplant from another person. If you are taking medications to prevent rejection of the kidney or tissue you are not eligible to donate. You are not eligible if you have had any other type of organ transplants regardless of medications to prevent rejection.

If you ever received a dura mater (brain covering) transplant, you are not eligible to donate. This requirement is related to concerns about the brain disease, Creutzfeld-Jacob Disease (CJD). Learn more about CJD and blood donation.

Piercing (ears, body), Electrolysis
Acceptable as long as the instruments used were sterile or single-use equipment..

Wait 12 months if there is any question whether or not the instruments used were sterile and free of blood contamination. This requirement is related to concerns about hepatitis. Learn more about hepatitis and blood donation.

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Pregnancy, Nursing
Persons who are pregnant are not eligible to donate. Wait 6 weeks after giving birth.

Sexually Transmitted Disease
Wait 12 months after treatment for syphilis or gonorrhea.

Acceptable if it has been more than 12 months since you completed treatment for syphilis or gonorrhea.

Chlamydia, venereal warts (human papilloma virus), or genital herpes are not a cause for deferral if you are feeling healthy and well and meet all other eligibility requirements.

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Sickle Cell
Acceptable if you have sickle cell trait. Those with sickle cell disease are not eligible to donate.

Skin Disease, Rash, Acne
Acceptable as long as the skin over the vein to be used to collect blood is not affected. If the skin disease has become infected, wait until the infection has cleared before donating. Taking antibiotics to control acne does not disqualify you from donating.

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Syphilis/Gonorrhea
Wait 12 months after being treated for syphilis or gonorrhea.

Tattoo
Wait 12 months after a tattoo if the tattoo was applied in a state that does not regulate tattoo facilities. This requirement is related to concerns about hepatitis. Learn more about hepatitis and blood donation.

Acceptable if the tattoo was applied by a state-regulated entity using sterile needles and ink that is not reused. Only a few states currently regulate tattoo facilities, so most donors with tattoos must wait 12 months after tattoo application before donating blood. You should discuss your particular situation with the health historian at the time of donation.

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Tuberculosis
If you have active tuberculosis or are being treated for active tuberculosis you should not donate. Acceptable if you have a positive skin test, but no active tuberculosis, or if you are receiving antibiotics for a positive TB skin test only. If you are being treated for a tuberculosis infection, wait until treatment is successfully completed before donating.

Travel Outside of U.S., Immigration
Wait 12 months after travel in an area where malaria is found. Wait 3 years after living in a country or countries where malaria is found. Persons who have spent long periods of time in countries where "mad cow disease" is found are not eligible to donate. This requirement is related to concerns about variant Creutzfeld Jacob Disease (vCJD). Learn more about vCJD and donation. Persons who were born in or who lived in certain countries in Western Africa, or who have had close contact with persons who were born in or who lived in certain West African countries are not eligible to donate. This requirement is related to concerns about HIV Group O. Learn more about HIV Group O, and the specific African countries where it is found.

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Venereal Diseases
See also "Sexually Transmitted Disease"
Wait 12 months after treatment for syphilis or gonorrhea.

Chlamydia, venereal warts (human papilloma virus), or genital herpes are not a cause for deferral if you are feeling healthy and well and meet all other eligibility requirements.

Weight
You must weigh at least 110 Lbs to be eligible for blood donation for your own safety. Blood volume is in proportion to body weight. Donors who weight less than 110Lbs may not tolerate the removal of the required volume of blood as well as those who weigh more than 110Lbs. There is no upper weight limit as long as your weight is not higher than the weight limit of the donor bed/lounge you are using. You can discuss any upper weight limitations of beds and lounges with your local health historian.

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Last updated: 5/24/07
By: A.F.E. ,MD PhD and M.A.P., RN,BSN
Note to users: Eligibility guidelines may have changed since this information was last updated. For current information, please contact the
American Red Cross blood region nearest you.

In-Depth Discussion of Age and Blood Donation
Those younger than age 17 are almost always legal minors (not yet of the age of majority) who cannot give consent by themselves to donate blood. (Each state determines its own age of majority, which can be different for different activities.)

Persons under the age of 17 may, however, donate blood for their own use, in advance of scheduled surgery or in situations where their blood has special medical value for a particular patient such as a family member.


In-Depth Discussion of Variant Creutzfeld-Jacob Disease and Blood Donation
In some parts of the world, cattle can get an infectious, fatal brain disease called Mad Cow Disease. In these same locations, humans have started to get a new disease called variant Creutzfeld-Jacob Disease (vCJD) which is also a fatal brain disease. Scientists believe that vCJD is Mad Cow Disease that has somehow transferred to humans, possibly through the food chain.


There is now evidence from a small number of case reports involving patients and laboratory animal studies that vCJD can be transmitted through transfusion. There is no test for vCJD in humans that could be used to screen blood donors and to protect the blood supply. This means that blood programs must take special precautions to keep vCJD out of the blood supply by avoiding collections from those who have been where this disease is found.


At this time, the American Red Cross donor eligibility rules related to vCJD are as follows:


You are not eligible to donate if:


From January 1, 1980, through December 31, 1996, you spent (visited or lived) a cumulative time of 3 months or more, in the United Kingdom (UK), or
From January 1, 1980, to present, you had a blood transfusion in any country(ies) in the (UK). The UK includes any of the countries listed below.

  • Channel Islands
  • England
  • Falkland Islands
  • Gibraltar
  • Isle of Man
  • Northern Ireland
  • Scotland
  • Wales

You were a member of the of the U.S. military, a civilian military employee, or a dependent of a member of the U.S. military who spent a total time of 6 months on or associated with a military base in any of the following areas during the specified time frames

  • From 1980 through 1990 - Belgium, the Netherlands (Holland), or Germany
  • From 1980 through 1996 - Spain, Portugal, Turkey, Italy or Greece.

You spent (visited or lived) a cumulative time of 5 years or more from January 1, 1980, to present, in any combination of country(ies) in Europe, including

  • in the UK from 1980 through 1996 as listed in above
  • on or associated with military bases as described above, and
  • in other countries in Europe as listed below:
    • Albania
    • Austria
    • Belgium
    • Bosnia/Herzegovina
    • Bulgaria
    • Croatia
    • Czech Republic
    • Denmark
    • Finland
    • France
    • Germany
    • Greece
    • Hungary
    • Ireland (Republic of)
    • Italy
    • Kosovo (Federal Republic of Yugoslavia)
    • Liechtenstein
    • Luxembourg
    • Macedonia
    • Montenegro (Federal Republic of Yugoslavia)
    • Netherlands (Holland)
    • Norway
    • Poland
    • Portugal
    • Romania
    • Serbia (Federal Republic of Yugoslavia)
    • Slovak Republic (Slovakia)
    • Slovenia
    • Spain
    • Sweden
    • Switzerland
    • Turkey
    • Yugoslavia (Federal Republic includes Kosovo, Montenegro, and Serbia)

In-Depth Discussion of HIV Group O and Blood Donation
Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. The virus can be transmitted through blood transfusion, so all donor programs are required to question donors about possible HIV exposure, and to test donated blood for this virus.


There is a rare form of HIV called Type O that is found in western Africa. The available tests for HIV do not always detect the Type O strain. This means that blood programs must take special precautions to keep this virus out of the blood supply by not taking blood donations from those who have been where the virus is found.


Persons who were born in or lived in Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Niger and Nigeria since 1977 cannot be blood donors. The Food and Drug Administration, which is responsible for supervising the safety of the American blood supply, put this requirement in place in 1996. The requirement applies to all blood donation programs, including that of the American Red Cross. The list of countries with HIV Type O risk is based on information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) where experts monitor infections worldwide.


It is possible that the tests used to screen donated blood may someday be improved so that they detect Type O HIV. If so, these donation restrictions may be removed.


In-Depth Discussion of Creutzfeld-Jacob Disease (CJD) and Blood Donation
CJD is a rare, progressive and fatal brain disorder that occurs in all parts of the world and has been known about for decades. CJD is different from variant CJD, the new disease in humans thought to be associated with Mad Cow disease in the United Kingdom and elsewhere.


CJD appears to be an infectious disease. It has been transmitted from infected humans to patients through the transplantation of the covering of the brain (dura mater), use of contaminated brain electrodes, and injection of growth hormones derived from human pituitary glands. Rarely, CJD is associated with an hereditary predisposition; that is, it occurs in biologic or “blood” relatives ( persons in the same genetic family).


There is no evidence that CJD can be transmitted from donors to patients through blood transfusions. However, nobody knows for certain that this cannot happen. There is no test for CJD that could be used to screen blood donors. This means that blood programs must take special precautions to keep CJD out of the blood supply by not taking blood donations from those who might have acquired this infection.
You are considered to be at higher risk of carrying CJD if you

- Received a dura mater (brain covering) graft;
- Received human pituitary-derived growth hormone injections; or
- Have a biologic relative who has been diagnosed with CJD. Biologic relative in this setting means mother, father, sibling, grandparent, aunt, uncle or children.


If any of these descriptions apply to you, you should not donate blood until more is known about CJD and the risk to the blood supply.


In-Depth Discussion of Hepatitis and Blood Donation
"Hepatitis" means inflammation of the liver. Hepatitis can be caused by many things including gallstones, medications, drinking alcohol, obesity and liver infections.


Hepatitis caused by Hepatitis B virus and Hepatitis C virus can be easily transmitted from donors to patients through transfusion. It is possible for a donor to carry a hepatitis virus even though he has never been sick with an inflamed liver, and he feels entirely well at the time of donation.


Hepatitis B and hepatitis C are transmitted between people through sexual contact and blood-to-blood contact, such as occurs when needles are shared during IV drug use. Hepatitis viruses can also be transmitted from mothers to their unborn babies. However, many people who have hepatitis virus infection cannot determine how they became infected. There is a vaccine for the hepatitis B virus.


All blood donations are tested for hepatitis B and hepatitis C with several different tests. But because these tests are not perfect, it is still important for people who may be infected with hepatitis viruses to not donate blood. In some cases, all that is required is a waiting period after some particular event, such as an exposure to a patient with hepatitis, to be sure the person was not infected. In other cases, the likelihood of hepatitis is high enough that the person is not eligible to donate regardless of how much time has gone by.


In-Depth Discussion of Malaria and Blood Donation
Malaria is a blood infection caused by a parasite that can be transmitted from a donor to a patient through transfusion. It is possible to have a new infection with malaria but have no symptoms, even though the parasite is present in your blood. It is also possible to feel well, but have a very mild case of malaria, especially if you have lived for extended periods of time in parts of the world where malaria is found.


The Centers for Disease Control and Protection keep track of the locations with malaria for international travelers from the United States, and this information is available on their web site at http://www.cdc.gov. There is risk of malaria in some parts of Mexico. In the Caribbean, malaria is found only in Haiti and the Dominican Republic.


The countries that have NO malaria risk in any area are as follows, listed alphabetically:


Albania, Andorra, Anguilla, Antigua/Barbuda, Aruba, Australia, Austria, Azores, Bahamas, Bahrain, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Bermuda, Boznia/Herzegovina, British Indian Ocean Territory  Brunei, Bulgaria, Canada, Canary Islands, Cayman Islands, Chile, Christmas Island, Cook Islands, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Diego Garcia Islands, Dominica, Easter Island, England, Estonia, Falkland Islands, Faroe Islands, Fiji, Finland, France, French Polynesia, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Greenland, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guam, Holy See,  Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Northern and Republic of), Israel, Italy, , Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kuwait, , Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Madeira, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Martinique, Micronesia, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montserrat, Nauru, Netherlands, Netherland Antilles, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Niue, Norfolk Island, Northern Mariana Islands, Norway, Pacific Islands, Palau, Pitcairn Islands, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Reunion, Romania, Russia, Saint Helena, Saint Kitts, Saint Lucia, Saint Pierre, Saint Vincent, Samoa, San Marino, Scotland, Serbia and Montenegro,  Seychelles, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tokelau, Tonga, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Turks/Caicos Islands, Tuvalu, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, , Virgin Islands, Wake Island, and Yugoslavia.


Blood donations are not tested for malaria. Therefore, it is important that people who may have malaria or been exposed to malaria because of living in, or traveling to, a country where malaria is present not be allowed to donate blood until enough time has passed to be certain that they are not infected with malaria. This is done by having a waiting period for those who lived in, move from, or traveled to, the locations with malaria.


If you have traveled outside of the United States, your travel destinations will be reviewed to see if you were in a malaria-risk area. It would be most helpful if you came prepared to report the country and city or destinations to which you traveled, as well as the travel dates.

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